Lorenz & Partners

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

 

 

Office Information No.: 23 (EN)

 

What WTO Means to

Your Business

 

Reprint

August 2014

 

 

  

 

 

 

Contents

 

  1. World Trade Organization (WTO) 8

 

1.1 General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)                                                                 10

 

1.1.1 Overview………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 10

 

1.1.2 GATT 1994……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 10

 

1.1.3 Uruguay Round Understandings……………………………………………………………………………….. 11

 

1.1.4 The General Exceptions of GATT, “Article 20”………………………………………………….. 11

 

1.2 General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS)                                                                   12

 

1.2.1 Overview………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 12

 

1.2.2 Benefits of Services Liberalisation……………………………………………………………………………. 12

 

1.2.3 Obligation Under GATS……………………………………………………………………………………………… 13

 

1.2.4 General Obligations……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 13

 

1.2.5 Specific Commitments…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 14

 

1.2.6 Exceptions……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 14

 

1.3 Trade Related Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS)                                                               15

 

1.3.1 Overview………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 15

 

1.3.2 General Provisions……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 15

 

1.3.3 Enforcement System……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 15

 

1.3.4 Exceptions……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 16

 

1.3.5 Dispute Settlement……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 16

 

1.4 Trade Related Investment Measures (TRIMS) Agreement                                                  16

 

1.4.1 Objectives………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 16

 

1.4.2 Exceptions……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 17

 

1.4.3 Dispute Settlement……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 17

 

1.5 Trade Policy Review Mechanism (TPRM)                                                                                   17

 

1.6 Dispute Resolutions                                                                                                                               17

 

1.6.1 In Brief…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 17

 

1.6.2 Purpose of Rules of Conduct in Dispute Resolution……………………………………………. 18

 

1.6.3 Obligations under the WTO Rules of Conduct……………………………………………………… 18

 

1.6.4 Arbitration as an Alternative to Dispute Resolution Through Panel and

Appellate Body Procedure…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 18

 

1.6.5. Supervision of the Compliance of Two’s Rules……………………………………………………. 18

 

  1. International Monetary Fund (IMF) 20

2.1 The Creation of the IMF                                                                                                                      20

 

2.2 The Tasks of the IMF                                                                                                                            21

 

2.3 The Organisation of the IMF                                                                                                             21

 

2.3.1 Board of Governors……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 21

 

2.3.2 Executive Board……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 22

 

2.3.3 Managing   Director………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 22

 

2.4 The IMF’s Actions                                                                                                                                  22

 

2.4.1 Surveillance…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 22

 

2.4.2 Financial Assistance……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 22

 

2.4.3 Technical Assistance……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 23

 

  1. World Bank 23

 

3.1 History of the World Bank                                                                                                                 23 

 

3.2 Main Tasks of the World Bank                                                                                                                    23

3.3 The World Bank’s Structure                                                                                                                       24

3.4 The World Bank’s Operations                                                                                                                     25

4. Asian Development Bank (ADB)                                                                                                                    26

4.1 Brief Introduction of the ADB                                                                                                                    26

4.2 Main Tasks of the ADB                                                                                                                               26

4.3 Members                                                                                                                                                27

4.4 ADB                                                                                                                                  Funds 27

Appendix 1: Example of Commitments & Exemptions under GATS                                                                                                 29

Appendix 2: World Merchandise Exports (table)                                                                                                                    31

Appendix 3: Worlds exports of services (table)                                                                                                                    32

Appendix 4: Table of Worlds import of commercial services                                                                                                                    34

Bibliography                                                                                                                    36 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Reader,

 

Keeping brochures up to date involves a lot of effort and considerable cost.

 

The complete version of this brochure is therefore complimentary for our clients, associations and public organisations only. To all other users we charge a cost contribution of 50 EUR. Thank you for your understanding

 

If this brochure is interesting to you, please contact us by sending an e-mail to: [email protected] naming the brochure(s) you would like to obtain.

 

Thank you.

 

Best regards,

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

 

 

Lorenz & Partners

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kanzlei Information Nr.: 29 (DE)

 

 

 

Investitionen und Steuern in Hong Kong

 

 

April 2013

 

 

 

 

All rights reserved       LORENZ & PARTNERS 2013

 

Sehr geehrte/r Leser/in,

 

 

diese Broschüre soll Sie in Kurzform über die rechtlichen und steuerlichen Rah-menbedingungen für Investitionsvorhaben in Hong Kong informieren. Die hierin enthaltenen Informationen sollen Ihnen den Entscheidungsprozess zu möglichen Vorhaben erleichtern und auf eine solide Grundlage stellen.

 

Wir möchten Sie jedoch darauf hinweisen, dass diese Broschüre keine anwaltliche Beratung ersetzen soll und kann. Sollten Sie eine fundierte Analyse Ihres Vorha-bens wünschen, stehen wir Ihnen für eine individuelle Beratung jederzeit gerne zur Verfügung.

 

LORENZ & Partners ist eine internationale Anwaltskanzlei, die europäische Un-ternehmen bei der Organisation und Durchführung von Investitionsvorhaben so-wie der operativen Umsetzung Ihrer Projekte in Südostasien unterstützt und be-treut.

 

Wir hoffen, dass diese Broschüre Ihnen wertvolle Informationen liefert. Sollten Sie darüber hinaus Anregungen, Fragen, Ergänzungen oder Verbesserungsvorschläge haben, bitten wir Sie sich mit uns in Verbindung zu setzen.

 

Für Ihr Interesse bedankt sich

 

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

 

 

INHALT

 

1        EINFÜHRUNG…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5

 

1.1         ALLGEMEINE UND WIRTSCHAFTLICHE RAHMENBEDINGUNGEN……………………………………………………. 5

 

  • DAS VERHÄLTNIS ZUR PRO CHINA / CLOSER ECONOMIC PARTNERSHIP

 

 

AGREEMENT (CEPA) …………………………………………………………………………………………………….

9

 

2.1

WARENHANDEL ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

10

 

2.2

DIENSTLEISTUNGEN ………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

10

3   GESELLSCHAFTSGRÜNDUNG IN HONG KONG ………………………………………………….

12

 

3.1

LIMITED COMPANY …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

13

 

3.1.1

Gründung einer Limited Company…………………………………………………………………………………

13

 

3.1.2

Off-the-shelf-Company ………………………………………………………………………………………………

14

 

3.2

ALTERNATIVEN ZUR LIMITED COMPANY ……………………………………………………………………………….

15

 

3.2.1

Repräsentanz / Representative Office ………………………………………………………………………..

15

 

3.2.2

Zweigniederlassung (branch office) in Hong Kong …………………………………………………………

16

4

STEUERN ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

16

 

4.1

UNTERNEHMENSSTEUERN ………………………………………………………………………………………………………

16

 

4.1.1

Kriterien der Rechtsprechung …………………………………………………………………………………….

17

 

4.1.2

Sonderfall: Lizenzzahlungen ……………………………………………………………………………………….

19

 

4.1.3

Verwaltungsgrundsätze ……………………………………………………………………………………………….

20

 

4.1.4

Kreditfinanzierung ……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

26

 

4.2

AUßENSTEUERGESETZ …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

26

 

4.3

EINKOMMENSTEUER ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

28

 

4.4

ERBSCHAFTSTEUER ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

30

 

4.5

BUYER’S STAMP DUTY (BSD) ………………………………………………………………………………………………….

30

 

4.6

DOPPELBESTEUERUNGSABKOMMEN ………………………………………………………………………………………

31

 

4.6.1

Einführung …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

31

 

4.6.2

Übersicht DBA …………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

34

 

4.6.3

Steuerliche Beziehung zu Deutschland ……………………………………………………………………….

42

5

ARBEITSRECHT …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

43

 

5.1

EINFÜHRUNG …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

43

 

5.2

RECHTE UND PFLICHTEN DER ARBEITGEBER UND ARBEITNEHMER ……………………………………

43

 

5.3

KÜNDIGUNG ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

43

 

5.4

DISKRIMINIERUNG ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

44

 

5.5

KOLLEKTIVARBEITSVERTRÄGE ………………………………………………………………………………………………

44

 

5.6

LOHNSTRUKTUR, MINDESTLÖHNE, BEIHILFEN ……………………………………………………………………..

45

 

5.7

SOZIALVERSICHERUNGEN ………………………………………………………………………………………………………

45

 

 

 

 

 

5.8

ARBEITSSTUNDEN, ÜBERSTUNDEN, URLAUB …………………………………………………………………………

46

6   DAS RECHTSSYSTEM IM ALLGEMEINEN ……………………………………………………………….

47

 

6.1

COMMON LAW IN HONG KONG ……………………………………………………………………………………………..

47

 

6.2

DAS HONG KONGER GERICHTSSYSTEM ………………………………………………………………………………..

47

 

6.3

ARBITRATION IN HONG KONG ………………………………………………………………………………………………

50

 

6.3.1

Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre (HKIAC)……………………………………………..

51

 

6.3.2

International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) ……………………………………………………………….

51

 

6.4

GEGENSEITIGE ANERKENNUNG UND VOLLSTRECKUNG VON GERICHTSURTEILEN

UND

 

 

SCHIEDSURTEILEN IN CHINA UND HONG KONG…………………………………………………………………..

51

 

6.4.1

Gerichtsurteile…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

51

 

6.4.2

Schiedsgerichtsverfahren …………………………………………………………………………………………….

53

7

SCHLUSSBEMERKUNG ………………………………………………………………………………………………..

54

8

ANLAGEN ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

56

 

ANLAGE 1: ONSHORE / OFFSHORE PROFITS IN HONG KONG; …………………………………………………………

56

 

 

ÜBERSICHT TRADING UND MANUFACTURING PROFITS ………………………………………………….

56

 

ANLAGE 2: ANLAGE 1 ZUM ASTG: FESTSTELLUNGEN ÜBER WICHTIGE GEBIETE MIT NIEDRIGEN

 

 

STEUERSÄTZEN UND STEUERVERGÜNSTIGUNGEN FÜR JURISTISCHE PERSONEN – 2003 59

 

ANLAGE 3: ANWENDUNGSERLASS ZUM ASTG – TABELLE “ÜBERSICHT ÜBER DIE ZEITLICHEN

 

 

 

ANWENDUNGEN DER VORSCHRIFTEN DES ASTG” …………………………………………………………

63

 

 

 

 

 

Verehrte Leserin, verehrter Leser,

 

 

es ist sicher nachvollziehbar, dass es großen Aufwand und nicht unerhebliche Kosten verursacht, Broschüren zu erstellen und auf dem neuesten Stand zu halten.

 

 

Unseren Mandanten, Verbänden und öffentlichen Organisationen stellen wir die vollständigen Versionen unserer Broschüren gerne kostenlos zur Verfügung. Wir bitten aber um Verständnis, dass wir anderen Nutzern eine Kostenbeteiligung von 50 EUR berechnen.

 

Sollte Ihr Interesse an diesem Thema geweckt worden sein, senden Sie eine E-Mail an: [email protected] mit der genauen Bezeichnung der Broschüre(n), die Sie erhalten möchten. Wir werden Ihnen diese dann umgehend zukommen lassen.

 

Mit freundlichen Grüßen

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kanzlei Information Nr.: 34 (GE)

 

Business in Asien

 

Produktion in China

 

Logistik & Finanzierung in Hongkong

Hauptsitz in Europa

 

 

September 2013

 

 

 

All rights reserved                     LORENZ & PARTNERS 2013

 

Inhaltsverzeichnis

 

  1. Einleitung…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4

 

  1. Die Volksrepublik China (VRC)………………………………………………………………… 4

 

  1. Überblick über das Pearl River Delta (PRD)………………………………………… 9

 

  1. Die Region um Hongkong (Special Economic Region)………………. 11

 

  1. Hard Facts…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11
  2. Arbeitsbedingungen……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 13
  3. Anbindung an den internationalen Handel…………………………………………………………… 16

 

  1. Unternehmensgründung in VRC…………………………………………………………………… 18

 

  1. Das Repräsentationsbüro…………………………………………………………………………………………… 19
  2. Joint Venture…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 20

 

  1. Wholly Foreign-Owned Enterprise (WFOE)………………………………………………………… 23

 

  1. Steuern in China………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 23

 

  1. Die wichtigsten Steuerarten………………………………………………………………………………………. 23
  2. Das Unternehmenssteuerrecht…………………………………………………………………………………. 28

 

III. Hongkong als Logistik- und Finanzstandort…………………………. 30

 

  1. Allgemeine wirtschaftliche Rahmenbedingungen………………………….. 30

 

  1. Das Verhältnis zu China……………………………………………………………………………………… 34

 

  1. Einleitung und Bedeutung………………………………………………………………………………………… 34
  2. Umsetzung und Regelungsbereiche……………………………………………………………………….. 35
  3. Bedeutung für ausländische Unternehmen…………………………………………………………… 38
  4. Voraussetzungen des CEPA für Hongkong………………………………………………………….. 38

 

  1. Gesellschaftsgründung in Hongkong………………………………………………………… 39

 

  1. Die Limited Company………………………………………………………………………………………………… 39

 

  1. Alternativen zur Limited Company…………………………………………………………………………. 42

 

  1. Steuern…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 42

 

  1. Unternehmenssteuern………………………………………………………………………………………………… 42
  2. Einkommenssteuer…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 43
  3. Doppelbesteuerungsabkommen……………………………………………………………………………… 47

 

  1. Arbeitsrecht………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 51

 

  1. Allgemeines…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 51
  2. Rechte und Pflichten der Arbeitgeber und Arbeitnehmer………………………………….. 51
  3. Rentenversicherungssystem……………………………………………………………………………………… 52
  4. Lohnfälligkeit……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 52
  5. Mindestlohn………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 53 
  1. Das Rechtssystem……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 53

 

  1. Allgemeines…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 53
  2. Schiedsgerichtsbarkeit in Hongkong……………………………………………………………………… 54

 

  1. Gerichtsurteile und ihre Vollstreckbarkeit…………………………………………………………….. 60

 

  1. Zusammenfassung………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 64

 

  1. Gesellschaften mit Hauptsitz in Deutschland……………………….. 66

 

  1. Die GmbH als Holding für den alleinigen Eigentümer……………… 66

 

  1. Überblick Steuern…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 67

 

  1. Besteuerung ausländischer Dividenden…………………………………………………… 68

 

  1. Schlussbemerkung………………………………………………………………………………………………… 70

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Verehrte Leserin, verehrter Leser,

 

es ist sicher nachvollziehbar, dass es großen Aufwand und nicht unerhebli-che Kosten verursacht, Broschüren zu erstellen und auf dem neuesten Stand zu halten.

 

Die Vollversion dieser Publikation ist daher nur für Mandanten, Vereinigun-gen und öffentliche Organisationen kostenlos. Allen anderen Nutzern be-rechnen wir eine Schutzgebühr von 50 EUR. Vielen Dank für Ihr Verständ-nis.

 

Sollten Sie Interesse an dieser Broschüren haben, senden Sie bitte eine E-Mail an [email protected] mit der genauen Bezeichnung der Bro-schüre.

 

 

 

 

Lorenz & Partners

Legal, Tax, Business Consultants

 

 

 

Kanzlei Information Nr.: 35 (GE)

 

 

 

 

              Investieren in China – Aber wo?

 

     In Peking, Shanghai, Chengdu oder im Perflussdelta?

 

 

 

 

August 2013

 

 

 

 

A l l r i g h t s                        r e s e r v e d      ©                       L o r e n z               &            P a r t n e r s                2 0 1 3


 

 

 

Sehr geehrte/r Leser/in,

 

diese Broschüre soll Ihnen eine Einführung zu den allgemeinen investi-tionsrechtlichen Rahmenbedingungen in der V.R. China bieten sowie die herausragenden Wirtschaftsstandorte Peking, Shanghai, Chengdu und das Perlflussdelta vorstellen. Die hierin enthaltenen Informationen sollen Ih-nen den Entscheidungsprozess im Hinblick auf möglichen Investitions-vorhaben in der V.R China erleichtern und auf eine solide Grundlage stel-len.

 

Wir möchten Sie jedoch darauf hinweisen, dass diese Broschüre keine anwaltliche Beratung ersetzen soll und kann. Sollten Sie eine fundierte Analyse Ihres Vorhabens wünschen, stehen wir Ihnen für eine individuel-le Beratung jederzeit gerne zur Verfügung.

 

LORENZ & Partners ist eine internationale Anwaltskanzlei, die europäi-sche Unternehmen bei der Organisation und Durchführung von Investiti-onsvorhaben sowie der operativen Umsetzung Ihrer Projekte in Südost-asien unterstützt und betreut.

 

Wir hoffen, dass diese Broschüre Ihnen wertvolle Informationen liefert. Sollten Sie darüber hinaus Anregungen, Fragen, Ergänzungen oder Ver-besserungsvorschläge haben, bitten wir Sie sich mit uns in Verbindung zu setzen.

 

Für Ihr Interesse bedankt sich

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

 

 

Inhaltsverzeichnis

 

 

 

 

  1. Allgemeine Informationen über China……………………………………………………………………………………. 4

 

  1. Unternehmensgründung in China………………………………………………………………………………………… 10

 

  1. Das Repräsentationsbüro………………………………………………………………………………………………. 12

 

  1. Das Joint Venture……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 13

 

  1. Die Wholly Foreign Owned Enterprise……………………………………………………………………. 16

 

III. Steuern in China……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 19

 

  1. Die wichtigsten Steuerarten………………………………………………………………………………………….. 19

 

1.1. Körperschaftssteuer…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 19

1.2. Einkommenssteuer……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 21

1.3. Mehrwertsteuer und Geschäftssteuer……………………………………………………………………… 22

1.4. Reform der Mehrwertsteuer………………………………………………………………………………………. 22

1.5. Einfuhrumsatzsteuer…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 23

 

  1. Das Doppelbesteuerungsabkommen China – Hongkong…………………………………. 23

 

  1. Das Doppelbesteuerungsabkommen China – Deutschland…………………………….. 25

 

  1. Das chinesische Rechtssystem……………………………………………………………………………………………. 26

 

  1. Die chinesischen Sonderwirtschaftszonen…………………………………………………………………………. 31

 

  1. Peking……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 32

 

1.1. Region……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 32

 

1.2. Verkehr…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 33

 

1.3. Wirtschaft…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 35

 

1.4. Wirtschaftszonen………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 36

 

  1. Zhongguancun Science Park……………………………………………………………………………… 37
  2. Haidian Development Area………………………………………………………………………………… 37

 

  1. Beijing Economic and Technical Development Area………………………………. 39

 

1.5. Industrien…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 40

 

  1. Shanghai………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 40

 

2.1. Region……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 40

 

2.2. Verkehr…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 42

 

2.3. Wirtschaft…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 45

 

2.4. Wirtschaftszonen………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 47

 

  1. Die Pudong New Area…………………………………………………………………………………………… 48

 

  1. Der Changning District……………………………………………………………………………………….. 49

 

2.5. Industrien…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 50

 

  1. Chengdu……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 52

 

3.1. Region……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 52

 

3.2. Verkehr…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 53

 

3.3. Wirtschaft…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 54

 

3.4. Wirtschaftszonen………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 55

 

3.5. Industrien…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 56

 

  1. Das Perlflussdelta…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 57

 

4.1. Region……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 57

 

4.2. Verkehr…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 59

 

4.3. Wirtschaft…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 61

 

4.4. Wirtschaftszonen………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 63

 

  1. Shenzhen 63

 

  1. Zhuhai 64

 

4.5. Industrien…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 65

VII. Schlussbemerkung………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 65

 

Anhang 1: Übersicht über die Investmentzonen in Shanghai…………………………………………….. 67

 

Anhang 2: Übersicht über die einzelnen Standorte……………………………………………………………….. 69

 

 

 

 

 

Verehrte Leserin, verehrter Leser,

 

es ist sicher nachvollziehbar, dass es großen Aufwand und nicht unerhebli-che Kosten verursacht, Broschüren zu erstellen und auf dem neuesten Stand zu halten. Wir stellen daher nur kürzere Newsletter online zur Verfügung.

 

Sollten Sie Interesse an dieser oder anderen unserer Broschüren haben, senden Sie bitte eine E-Mail an [email protected] mit der genauen Bezeich-nung der Broschüre(n), die Sie gerne erhalten würden.

 

Mit freundlichen Grüßen

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

 

 

Lorenz & Partners

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

 

 

Office Information No.: 48 (EN)

 

 

 

How to Manage a Company in Vietnam

 

 

Brief overview of legal authority and managing powers in a company in Vietnam

 

(Law on Enterprises)

 

 

 

 

July 2011

 

 

 

 

 

All rights reserved © LORENZ & PARTNERS 2011

 

Table of Content

 

 

 

 

  1. INTRODUCTION…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4

 

  1. PARTNERSHIP………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4

 

1             DEFINITION………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4

2             STRUCTURE…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4

3             PARTNERS’ COUNCIL……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

4             CHAIRMAN OF PARTNERS’ COUNCIL……………………………………………………………………………. 5

5             UNLIMITED LIABILITY PARTNERS…………………………………………………………………………………. 5

6             LIMITED LIABILITY PARTNERS…………………………………………………………………………………………. 6

7             DIRECTOR……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6

 

8             LEGAL REPRESENTATIVE……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7

 

 

III . LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY……………………………………………………….7

 

  1. LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY WITH ONE MEMBER……………………………………… 7

 

(a) One member being an organisation……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7

 

  1. Definition…………………………………………………………………………………..…………………………………………..7
  2. Structure……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7

iii. Company Owner………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 8

  1. Authorised Representatives…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 8
  2. Members’ Council………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 8
  3. Chairman of Members’ Council……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 8

vii. Director………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. .9

viii. Legal Representative …………………………………………………….……………………………………9

 

  1. Inspectors……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 9

 

(b) One member being a natural person…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 10

 

  1. Definition…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 10
  2. Structure……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 10

iii. Company Owner……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 10

  1. Director…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 10
  2. Legal Representative……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11

 

  1. Chairman of the company…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11

 

  1. LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY WITH TWO OR MORE MEMBERS……………….11

 

(a) Definition…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 11

(b) Structure…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 11

(c) Members’ Council……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 12

(d) Chairman of the Members’ Council…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 12

 

(e) Members…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12 

(f) Director………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 12

(g) Legal Representative……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 13

 

(h) Inspector…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 13

 

  1. SHAREHOLDING COMPANY……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 13

 

1             DEFINITION……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 13

2             STRUCTURE…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 14

3             GENERAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS……………………………………………………………………. 14

4             BOARD OF MANAGEMENT…………………………………………………………………………………………………… ..15

5             MEMBERS OF BOARD OF MANAGEMENT…………………………………………………………………….. 16

6             CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF MANAGEMENT………………………………………………………… 16

7             DIRECTOR………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 16

8             LEGAL REPRESENTATIVE………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 17

 

9             INSPECTION COMMITTEE………………………………………………………… 17

 

  1. PRIVATE COMPANY…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 18

 

1             DEFINITION……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 18

2             STRUCTURE……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 18

 

3             COMPAMY OWNER………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 18

4             DIRECTOR……………………………………………………………………………  18

 

5             LEGAL REPRESENTATIVE……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 19

 

  1. SUMMARY………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 19

 

 

 

 

Dear Reader,

 

 

 

Keeping our brochures up to date involves a lot of time and effort.

 

Only shorter newletters are therefore available for immediate download on our website. However, if you are interested in this or another of our brochures, please contact us by sending an email to: [email protected] naming the brochure(s) you would like to obtain.

 

 

Best regards,

 

 

 

Lorenz & Partners.

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

Lorenz & Partners

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

 

 

Office Information Nr.: 57 (EN)

 

 

 

Signing & Terminating A

 

Labour Agreement

 

in Vietnam

 

 

August 2011

 

 

All rights reserved © LORENZ & PARTNERS 2011

 

 

Table of Content

 

  1. LABOUR AGREEMENT………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3

 

  1. SIGNING AUTHORITY……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4

 

  1. Employer’s authority………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4

 

  1. Employee’s signing authority……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5

 

III.        TERMINATION OF LABOUR AGREEMENTS……………………………………………. 5

 

  1. UNILATERAL TERMINATION………………………………………………………………………………. 6

 

  1. Lawful unilateral termination by the Employee…………………………………………………………………….. 6

 

  1. Lawful Unilateral termination by the Employer……………………………………………………………………. 8

 

  1. UNLAWFUL TERMINATION & ITS CONSEQUENCES…………………….. 11

 

  1. Consequences for the Employer……………………………………………………………………………………………. 11

 

  1. Consequences for the employee…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12

 

  1. LAWFUL TERMINATION BY THE EMPLOYER & THE

 

CONSEQUENCES……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12

 

  1. Lawful termination by Employer…………………………………………………………………………………………… 12

 

  1. Consequences from lawful termination from Employer…………………………………………………… 12

 

VII.      FOREIGN EMPLOYEES………………………………………………………………………………………….. 13

 

VIII. FOREIGN COMPANIES EMPLOYING LOCAL VIETNAMESE

 

STAFF…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 13

 

  1. OUTLOOK…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 14

 

STANDARD FORM OF LABOUR AGREEMENT………………………………………………….. 15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Reader,

 

Keeping our brochures up to date involves a lot of time and effort. Only shorter newsletters are therefore available for immediate download on our website.

 

However, if you are interested in this or another of our brochures, please contact us by sending an e-mail to: [email protected] naming the brochure(s) you would like to obtain.

 

Best regards,

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

 

 

Lorenz & Partners

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

Information No.: 60 (EN)

 

 

 

Liquidation of a Private Hong Kong Limited Company

 

June 2014

 

 

All rights reserved © Lorenz & Partners 2014

 

Table of Contents

 

  1. INTRODUCTION………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3

 

  1. COMPULSORY WINDING UP BY THE COURT………………………………………………………………………… 4

 

  1. Persons, who can apply for a compulsory winding up……………………………………………………………………………………. 5

 

  1. A company’s petition………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5

 

  1. A creditor’s petition…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5

 

  1. A contributory’s petition……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

 

  1. Other parties that can file the petition…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5
  2. Grounds for winding up………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6
  3. Commencement of a mandatory winding up……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7

 

  1. Disposition of property……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7

 

  1. Judgments against the company…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 7

 

  1. Provisional Liquidator………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7

 

  1. Preliminary Report………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8

 

  1. Meetings of Creditors and Contributories…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9
  2. The powers and duties of the liquidator…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9
  3. Summary procedure for a compulsory winding-up by the court……………………………………………………………….. 10

 

III.VOLUNTARY WINDING-UP………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 10

 

  1. Commencing a voluntary winding-up………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 10

 

  1. Members’ voluntary winding up………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 11

 

  1. Creditor’s winding up………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 12
  2. The powers and duties of the liquidator in a voluntary winding- up…………………………………………………………. 12
  3. Voluntary winding up according to Section 228A CWUO…………………………………………………………………………. 12

 

  1. THE ASSETS OF A COMPANY AVAILABLE FOR DISTRIBUTION………………………. 13

 

  1. The members of the company……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 13
  2. The directors of the company…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 13

 

  1. Other Debtors………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 14

 

  1. Onerous property………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 14

 

  1. COMPLETION OF WINDING UP AND TERMINATION……………………………………………….. 14

 

  1. Proof and ranking of claims……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 14

 

  1. Preferential payments…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 15

 

  1. Category A: Relating to employees…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 15

 

  1. Category B: Relating to the Government……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 15

 

  1. Category C: Relating to companies being a bank………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 15

 

  1. Category D: Relating to companies being an insurance company……………………………………………………………………………….. 15

 

  1. Distribution of the surplus assets……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 16

 

  1. DISSOLUTION OF THE COMPANY……………………………………………………………………………………………… 16

 

  1. Dissolution in case of a mandatory winding up……………………………………………………………………………………………… 16

 

  1. Dissolution in the case of voluntary winding-up…………………………………………………………………………………………… 17

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Reader,

 

Keeping brochures up to date involves a lot of effort and considerable cost.

 

The complete version of this brochure is therefore complimentary for our clients, associations and public organisations only. To all other users we charge a cost contribution of 50 EUR. Thank you for your understanding

 

If this brochure is interesting to you, please contact us by sending an e-mail to: [email protected] naming the brochure(s) you would like to obtain.

 

Thank you.

 

Best regards,

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

 

 

Lorenz & Partners

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kanzlei-Information Nr.: 1 (GE)

 

Gesellschaftsgründungen

in Thailand

 

März 2016

 

 

 

 

A l l  r i g h t s  r e s e r v e d  Ó L O R E N Z  & P A R T N E R S  2 0 1 6

 

 

Verehrter Leser,

 

im Folgenden erhalten Sie eine kurze Zusammenfassung über die Möglichkeiten einer Unternehmensgründung in Thailand.

 

Wir sind uns bewusst, dass dies nur einen kurzen Überblick über die differenzierte Ausprägung der Unternehmensformen in Thailand darstellt. Dennoch hoffen wir, dass diese Informationen Sie bei Ihrer weiteren Entscheidung unterstützen können.

 

Grundsätzlich ähneln einige Gesellschaftsformen den Ihnen aus Deutschland be-kannten. Dennoch sind einige wichtige Details erheblich anders ausgestaltet wor-den, so dass es sich empfiehlt, vor Ihrer Entscheidung sachkundigen Rat einzuho-len.

 

Wir hoffen auf Ihr Interesse beim Lesen der folgenden Informationen, erlauben uns aber den Hinweis, dass wir trotz aller Bemühungen unsererseits keine Haftung für den Inhalt dieser Broschüre übernehmen und uns sämtliche Rechte an der Bro-schüre und deren Inhalt vorbehalten haben.

 

Für Ihr Interesse bedankt sich

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INHALT

 

EINLEITUNG ……………………………………………………………………………………………

4

1.

DAS REPRÄSENTATIONSBÜRO …………………………………………………..

7

2.

DAS REGIONALBÜRO ………………………………………………………………….

10

3.

JOINT VENTURES………………………………………………………………………..

13

4.

DIE ZWEIGNIEDERLASSUNG / BRANCH ………………………………….

13

5.

PARTNERSHIPS ……………………………………………………………………………

14

5.1.

UNREGISTERED ORDINARY PARTNERSHIP ……………………………………………………..

15

5.2.

REGISTERED ORDINARY PARTNERSHIP ………………………………………………………….

15

5.3.

LIMITED PARTNERSHIP …………………………………………………………………………………..

16

5.4.

VERFAHRENSWEISE ZUR ERRICHTUNG EINER PARTNERSHIP …………………………..

16

5.5.

PFLICHTEN DER PARTNERSHIP ……………………………………………………………………….

17

5.6.

BESTEUERUNG ……………………………………………………………………………………………….

17

6.

LIMITED COMPANIES …………………………………………………………………

17

6.1

COMPANY LIMITED ………………………………………………………………………………………..

18

6.1.1.

Gründungsprozess ………………………………………………………………………………………

18

6.1.2. Ausländische Anteilseigner ……………………………………………………………………………….

19

6.1.3.

Leitung und Vertretung ………………………………………………………………………………

20

6.1.4.

Registriertes Kapital ……………………………………………………………………………………

21

6.1.5.

Firmensiegel ………………………………………………………………………………………………

21

6.1.6.

Steuern …………………………………………………………………………………………………….

21

6.2.

PUBLIC LIMITED COMPANY ……………………………………………………………………………

22

7.

UNTERNEHMENSPFLICHTEN …………………………………………………

23

ANNEX ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….

26

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Verehrte Leserin, verehrter Leser,

 

es ist sicher nachvollziehbar, dass es großen Aufwand und nicht unerhebli-che Kosten verursacht, Broschüren zu erstellen und auf dem neuesten Stand zu halten.

 

Unseren Mandanten, Verbänden und öffentlichen Organisationen stellen wir die vollständigen Versionen unserer Broschüren gerne kostenlos zur Verfü-gung. Wir bitten aber um Verständnis, dass wir anderen Nutzern eine Kos-tenbeteiligung von 50 EUR berechnen.

 

Sollte Ihr Interesse an diesem Thema geweckt worden sein, senden Sie eine E-Mail an: [email protected] mit der genauen Bezeichnung der Broschüre(n), die Sie erhalten möchten. Wir werden Ihnen diese dann um-gehend zukommen lassen.

 

Mit freundlichen Grüßen

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

 

Lorenz & Partners

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

 

Office Information No.: 1 (EN)

 

How to set up a company in Thailand

 

March 2016

 

 

 

 

All rights reserved   Ó LORENZ & PARTNERS 2016

 

 

PREFACE

 

The following brochure is meant to be a short summary of the Thai corporate law.

 

We are aware of the fact that it can only be the first step to describe the very com-plex forms of doing business in Thailand. However, we hope that this information can be helpful for you in your further decisions.

 

Generally speaking, Thai corporate law and the exact procedures of setting up a company are often quite similar to the procedures you are familiar with, but, as you know, important details can be different. Thus, we advise you to proceed carefully and with far-sightedness.

 

We would be glad if this brochure meets your interest.

 

Please allow us to inform you that despite all our efforts we cannot accept liability for this brochure and its contents and we reserve all rights derived from it.

 

 

 

LORENZ & PARTNERS thank you very much for your interest in our work.

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Introduction …………………………………………………………………………………………………………  

4

1. Representative Office …………………………………………………………………………………… 6

2. Regional Office …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9

3. Joint Ventures …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11

4. Branch Office …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12

5. Partnerships ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 13

  5.1.  Unregistered Ordinary Partnership ………………………………………………………. 13

  5.2.  Registered Ordinary Partnership ………………………………………………………….. 14

  5.3.  Limited Partnership …………………………………………………………………………….. 14

  5.4.  Procedure for establishing a Partnership ……………………………………………… 15

  5.5.  Duties of the Partnership …………………………………………………………………….. 15

  5.6.  Taxation ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 16

6. Limited Company ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 16

  6.1.  Private Limited Company ……………………………………………………………………. 16

  6.1.1. Company Setup Procedure ………………………………………………………. 16

  – Company Name Reservation ……………………………………………………. 16

  – Promoters ………………………………………………………………………………… 16

  6.1.2. Foreign Shareholding……………………………………………………………….. 18

  6.1.3.  Directors and Board of Directors …………………………………………….. 19

  6.1.4. Registered Capital …………………………………………………………………….. 19

  6.1.5. Company Seal ………………………………………………………………………….. 19

  6.1.6. Tax Implication ……………………………………………………………………….. 20

  6.2.  Public Limited Company …………………………………………………………………….. 20

7. Duties of Companies ………………………………………………………………………………….. 20

Annex ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..24

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Reader,

 

Keeping brochures up to date involves a lot of effort and considerable cost.

 

The complete version of this brochure is therefore complimentary for our clients, associations and public organisations only. To all other users we charge a cost contribution of 50 EUR. Thank you for your understanding.

 

If this brochure is interesting to you, please contact us by sending an e-mail to: [email protected] naming the brochure(s) you would like to ob-tain.

 

Thank you.

 

Best regards,

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

 

Lorenz & Partners

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kanzlei-Information Nr.: 2 (GE)

 

Immobilienerwerb durch Ausländer in Thailand

 

Oktober 2014

 

 

 

 

 

Ó L O R E N Z  &  P A R T N E R S  2 0 1 4

 

Verehrte Leser,

 

der Erwerb von Grundeigentum ist in Thailand für Ausländer nur in sehr be-schränktem Masse möglich.

 

Im Wesentlichen ist ein Landerwerb für Ausländer nur zu wirtschaftlichen Zwe-cken, insbesondere über eine Förderung durch das thailändische Board of In-vestment gestattet. Zu Wohnzwecken ist der Erwerb von Grundeigentum mit legalen Mitteln kaum zu realisieren, vielmehr wird in diesem Bereich auf die auch für Ausländer bestehende Möglichkeit zurückgegriffen, Eigentumswoh-nungen (Condominiums) zum Volleigentum zu erwerben.

 

Auch die Variante, über einen thailändischen Ehepartner Grundstücke zu erwer-ben, ist entweder nicht legal oder nur ohne Sicherheiten für den ausländischen Ehepartner möglich.

 

Wir erlauben uns den Hinweis, dass wir trotz aller Bemühungen um die Richtig-keit keine Haftung für den Inhalt dieser Broschüre übernehmen können und uns bezüglich des Copyrights sämtliche Rechte an der Broschüre und ihrem Inhalt vorbehalten. Kopien unter Nennung des Verfassers sind allerdings willkommen.

 

Für Ihr Interesse bedankt sich

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

 

Gliederung

 

 

 

 

I.

Grundsätzliches ……………………………………………………………………………..

4

II.

Eigentumserwerb an Grundstücken und Gebäuden …………………………..

5

1)

Privatpersonen …………………………………………………………………………………….

5

 

1.1

Eigentumserwerb an Grundstücken …………………………………………………….

5

 

1.2

Eigentumserwerb an Gebäuden …………………………………………………………..

9

2)

Gesellschaften ……………………………………………………………………………………

10

 

2.1

Grundstückserwerb außerhalb der Industriezonen …………………………….

10

 

2.2

Grundstückserwerb innerhalb der Industriezonen ………………………..

12

 

2.3

Grundstückserwerb mit BOI-Genehmigung …………………………………

12

III. Formalitäten ………………………………………………………………………………….

13

1)

Landkauf ……………………………………………………………………………………………

13

 

1.1

Kaufvertrag ……………………………………………………………………………………….

13

 

1.2

Landdokumente ……………………………………………………………………………

13

 

1.3.

Registrierung …………………………………………………………………………………

14

 

1.4

Besonderheiten beim Landkauf in Industriezonen ………………………..

15

2)  Erwerb von Eigentumswohnungen (condominiums) ……………………

15

 

2.1

Grundsätzliches …………………………………………………………………………….

15

 

2.2

Eigentumsnachweis …………………………………………………………………………..

16

 

2.3

Verfahren zur Übertragung des Eigentums ……………………………………

16

IV. Miete von Wohn- und Geschäftsräumen ………………………………………….

17

1)   Grundstücke für kommerzielle und industrielle Zwecke ………………

17

2)  Grundstücke für private Zwecke ……………………………………………………..

17

3)

Andere mietrechtsähnliche Rechtsinstitute ……………………………………

18

 

3.1

Arsai (Sec. 1402 ff. CCC – Wohnrecht) ………………………………………….

18

 

3.2

Usufruct (Sec. 1417 ff. CCC – Nießbrauch) ……………………………………….

18

 

3.3

Superficies (Sec. 1410 ff. CCC – Erbbaurecht) ………………………………

18

V.

Steuerliche Besonderheiten beim Immobilienverkauf ……………………….

19

1)

“specific business tax” …………………………………………………………………….

19

2)

“government transfer fee” ………………………………………………………………..

19

3)

“stamp duty” …………………………………………………………………………………….

19

4)

“withholding tax” ……………………………………………………………………………..

20

VI. Jährlich anfallende Steuern für Grundstückseigentümer …………………..

23

1)   Local Development Tax (Act B.E. 2508) …………………………………………

23

2)  House and Land Tax (Act B.E. 2475) ……………………………………………..

23

Annex:

Übersicht über die Möglichkeiten des Eigentumserwerbs an

Grundstücken in Thailand durch Gesellschaften …………………………………..

24

 

 

 

 

 

 

Verehrte Leserin, verehrter Leser,

 

es ist sicher nachvollziehbar, dass es großen Aufwand und nicht unerhebliche Kosten verursacht, Broschüren zu erstellen und auf dem neuesten Stand zu halten.

 

Die Vollversion dieser Publikation ist daher nur für Mandanten, Vereinigungen und öffentliche Organisationen kostenlos. Allen anderen Nutzern berechnen wir eine Schutzgebühr von 50 EUR. Vielen Dank für Ihr Verständnis.

 

Sollten Sie Interesse an dieser Broschüren haben, senden Sie bitte eine E-Mail an [email protected] mit der genauen Bezeichnung der Broschüre.

 

 

 

Lorenz & Partners

Tax, Legal and Business Consultants

 

 

 

Kanzlei-Information Nr.: 4 (DE)

 

Schiedsverfahren, Vollstreckung und Anerkennung von

 

 

Schiedssprüchen

 

 

in Thailand und Deutschland

 

 

März 2016

 

 

 

All rights reserved    Ó  LORENZ & PARTNERS 2016

 

Verehrte Leser,

 

 

die Ihnen vorliegenden Informationen beschäftigen sich mit Problemen, die bei internationalen Rechtsstreitigkeiten auftreten können.

 

Wir haben versucht, die besondere Problematik von Schiedsgerichtsklauseln darzustellen. Nicht selten werden diese unklar formuliert, was dann im Streitfall zu erheblichen Problemen führt. Weiterhin wird ein kurzer Überblick über das deutsche und thailändische Schiedsrecht gegeben.

 

LORENZ & PARTNERS ist eine Wirtschaftskanzlei, die fast ausschließlich Inves-titionsvorhaben deutschsprachiger und sonstiger europäischer Unternehmen in Südostasien be-treut. In diesem Zusammenhang wollen wir Sie über die wichtigsten Regelungen von Schiedsgerichtsverfahren informieren.

 

Wir erlauben uns den Hinweis, dass wir trotz aller Bemühungen um die Richtigkeit keine Haftung für den Inhalt dieser Broschüre übernehmen und uns bezüglich des Copyrights sämtliche Rechte an der Broschüre und ihrem Inhalt vorbehalten. Kopien unter Nennung des Verfassers sind je-doch willkommen.

 

Für Ihr Interesse bedanken sich

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

Inhaltsverzeichnis

 

 

 

 

  1. EINFÜHRUNG……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4

 

 

  1. ARBITRATION…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5

 

  1. ICC Arbitration………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 6

 

  1. a) Allgemeines………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6

 

  1. b) Gerichtshof und Sekretariat………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7

 

  1. c) Schiedsrichter……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8

 

  1. d) Das Verfahren vor einem Schiedsgericht…………………………………………………………………………… 8

 

  1. Deutsches und thailändisches Schiedsverfahren……………………………………………………….. 8

 

  1. a) Anwendbares Recht………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 9

 

  1. b) Schiedsvereinbarung……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 9

 

  1. c) Besetzung des Schiedsgerichtes……………………………………………………………………………………………. 10

 

  1. d) Verhältnis Schiedsgerichte und staatliche Gerichte………………………………………………….. 12

 

  1. e) Schiedsspruch………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 12

 

  1. g) Anerkennung und Vollstreckung von Schiedsurteilen……………………………………………… 15

 

  1. h) „Fast Track Arbitration“…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 17

 

  1. Inhalt einer Schiedsvereinbarung………………………………………………………………………………………. 19

 

 

III. ANLAGEN…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 21

 

 

 

 

 

Verehrte Leserin, verehrter Leser,

 

es ist sicher nachvollziehbar, dass es großen Aufwand und nicht unerhebli-che Kosten verursacht, Broschüren zu erstellen und auf dem neuesten Stand zu halten.

 

Unseren Mandanten, Verbänden und öffentlichen Organisationen stellen wir die vollständigen Versionen unserer Broschüren gerne kostenlos zur Verfü-gung. Wir bitten aber um Verständnis, dass wir anderen Nutzern eine Kos-tenbeteiligung von 50 EUR berechnen.

 

Sollte Ihr Interesse an diesem Thema geweckt worden sein, senden Sie eine E-Mail an: [email protected] mit der genauen Bezeichnung der Broschüre(n), die Sie erhalten möchten. Wir werden Ihnen diese dann um-gehend zukommen lassen.

 

Mit freundlichen Grüßen

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

Lorenz & Partners

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

Kanzlei-Information Nr. 5 (GE)

 

Das deutsche Zuwanderungsrecht

 

Oktober 2014

 

 

 

A l l  r i g h t s  r e s e r v e d  ©  L o r e n z  &  P a r t n e r s  2 0 1 4

 

Sehr geehrter Leser,

 

mit dieser Informationsbroschüre erhalten Sie einen kurzen Überblick über die Möglichkeiten, eine Berechtigung für den Aufenthalt und die Aufnahme einer Er-werbstätigkeit in Deutschland zu erhalten.

 

Durch das Inkrafttreten des Zuwanderungsgesetzes am 1. Januar 2005 gab es eini-ge Änderungen im Vergleich zur alten Rechtslage, die zur Vereinfachung der Ver-fahren führen dürften.

 

Wir hoffen, dass dieser Überblick für Sie von Nutzen ist und freuen uns über Fra-gen, Anregungen und Feedback jeglicher Art, welches uns hilft, diese Informati-onsbroschüre weiterzuentwickeln und auf dem aktuellen Stand zu halten.

 

Für Ihr Interesse bedankt sich

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

Obwohl Lorenz & Partners große Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in diesen Newslettern bereitgestellten Informa-tionen auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass dies eine in-dividuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen können. Lorenz & Partners übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität, Korrektheit oder Vollständigkeit der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Part-ners, welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nutzung oder Nichtnutzung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter oder unvollständiger Informationen verur-sacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorliegt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inhaltsverzeichnis

 

1

Einleitung …………………………………………………………………………………….

4

2

Aufenthaltsberechtigung ………………………………………………………………..

4

 

2.1

Aufenthaltstitel ……………………………………………………………………….

5

 

 

2.1.1 Visum …………………………………………………………………………………………..

5

 

 

2.1.2

Aufenthaltserlaubnis ……………………………………………………………………

6

 

2.1.3.

Niederlassungserlaubnis ………………………………………………….

8

 

2.1.4.

Erlaubnis zum Daueraufenthalt-EU ………………………………….

9

 

2.1.5.

Blaue Karte EU ………………………………………………………………

10

 

2.2

Ausnahmen vom Erfordernis eines Aufenthaltstitels …………………

11

 

 

2.2.1 Kurzaufenthalte …………………………………………………………………………

11

 

 

2.2.2 Längere Aufenthalte …………………………………………………………………..

11

 

 

2.2.3 Beabsichtigte Erwerbstätigkeit……………………………………………………

11

3

Arbeiten in Deutschland ……………………………………………………………….

12

 

3.2 Voraussetzungen für die Erteilung der Zustimmung ………………….

12

 

 

3.2.1 Vorliegen einer Erwerbstätigkeit ………………………………………………..

12

 

 

3.2.2. Zustimmungsfreie Beschäftigungen ………………………………………….

13

 

 

3.2.3. Nicht- und Geringqualifizierte Beschäftigungen ……………………….

14

 

 

3.2.4. Qualifizierte Beschäftigungen ……………………………………………………

14

4

Rechtsschutzmöglichkeiten …………………………………………………………..

14

 

4.1

Widerspruchsverfahren …………………………………………………………..

14

 

4.2

Klageverfahren ………………………………………………………………………

14

 

4.3

Einstweiliger Rechtsschutz …………………………………………………….

14

 

4.4

Betreuung durch einen deutschen Rechtsanwalt ………………………

15

 

 

 

Verehrte Leserin, verehrter Leser,

 

es ist sicher nachvollziehbar, dass es großen Aufwand und nicht unerhebliche Kosten verursacht, Broschüren zu erstellen und auf dem neuesten Stand zu halten.

 

Die Vollversion dieser Publikation ist daher nur für Mandanten, Vereinigungen und öffentliche Organisationen kostenlos. Allen anderen Nutzern berechnen wir eine Schutzgebühr von 50 EUR. Vielen Dank für Ihr Verständnis.

 

Sollten Sie Interesse an dieser Broschüren haben, senden Sie bitte eine E-Mail an [email protected] mit der genauen Bezeichnung der Broschüre.

 

Mit freundlichen Grüßen

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

 

Lorenz & Partners

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brochure No.: 5 (EN)

 

German Immigration Law

 

 

 

October 2014

 

 

 

 

 

All Rights Reserved   Ó LORENZ & PARTNERS 2014

 

Valued reader,

 

This brochure provides you with a short overview on the New German Immigration Law in the form of the Immigration Act that entered into force on 1 January, 2005.

 

This brochure cannot and does not intend to replace any individual legal advice.

 

LORENZ & PARTNERS is an international law firm assisting a number of German and other European companies with their investments and operations in South East Asia.

 

We hope that this brochure is of value to you and appreciate all of your questions, re-marks, ideas and other feedback helping us to improve and regularly update this bro-chure.

 

Thank you for your interest,

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures, we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information provided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, including any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

1          Executive Summary………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

 

2          Right of Residence…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

 

2.1 Residence titles for specific purposes……………………………………………………………….. 5

 

2.1.1 Visa           6

 

2.1.1.1 Procedure and general conditions    6

 

2.1.1.2 Schengen Visa 6

 

2.1.1.3 National Visa for long-term stay        7

 

2.1.2 Limited Residence Permit        7

 

2.1.2.1 Procedure and general conditions    7

 

2.1.2.2 Formation        9

 

2.1.2.3 Employment   9

 

2.1.2.4 According to international law, political and humanitarian

 

reasons              10

 

2.1.2.5 Family Reunion            10

 

2.1.3 Unlimited Settlement Permit   10

 

2.1.3.1 Procedure and general conditions    10

 

2.1.3.2 Highly Qualified………………………………………………………………………………. 11

 

2.1.4 Permit for a long-term stay EU………………………………………………………………….. 11

 

2.1.4.1 Procedure and general conditions……………………………………………… 11

 

2.1.4.2 Expiration        12

 

2.1.5 Blue Card EU     12

 

2.1.2.1 Procedure and general conditions    12

 

2.1.2.2 Validity und loss           13

 

2.1.2.3 Obtainment of a Settlement Permit 13

 

2.2 Exceptions to the requirement of a residence title…………………………………….. 13

 

2.2.1 Short-term stay  13

 

2.2.2 Longer stay         13

 

2.2.3 Intended employment 14

 

  1. Working in Germany…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 14

 

3.1 Procedure…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 14

 

3.2 Conditions for the issuance of the approval………………………………………………….. 14

 

3.2.1 Employment       15

 

3.2.2 Free consent employment         15

 

 

3.2.3 Non and low-qualified employment   16

 

3.2.4 Qualified employment 16

 

  1. Possibilities of legal protection……………………………………………………………………………………….. 16

 

4.1 Opposition Proceeding   16

 

4.2 Prosecution Proceeding 17

 

4.3 Interim legal protection  17

 

4.4 Assistance of a German lawyer  17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Reader,

 

Keeping brochures up to date involves a lot of effort and considerable cost.

 

The complete version of this brochure is therefore complimentary for our clients, associations and public organisations only. To all other users we charge a cost contribution of 50 EUR. Thank you for your understanding

 

If this brochure is interesting to you, please contact us by sending an e-mail to: [email protected] naming the brochure(s) you would like to obtain.

 

Thank you.

 

Best regards,

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lorenz & Partners

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

 

Kanzlei-Information Nr.: 6 (GE)

 

Hinweise zu

BOI – Anträgen

 

 

April 2015

 

 

 

 

All rights reserved      LORENZ & PARTNERS 2015

 

 

 

 

Verehrte Leser,

 

eine Board Of Investment Förderung für zukünftige Unternehmungen stellt eine sehr interessante und oft genutzte Möglichkeit für ausländische Investoren dar, sich in Thailand geschäftlich zu betätigen.

 

Daher haben wir für Sie in dieser Broschüre die wesentlichen Voraussetzungen für eine BOI Förderung zusammengestellt.

 

Allerdings bedürfen BOI-Anträge einer sehr gewissenhaften Vorbereitung, so dass wir Ihnen mit dieser kurzen Broschüre lediglich einige allgemeine Hinweise an die Hand geben können.

 

Erlauben Sie uns bitte auch den Hinweis, dass wir trotz sorgfältiger Bearbeitung unsererseits keine Haftung für den Inhalt dieser Broschüre übernehmen und uns bzgl. des Copyrights sämtliche Rechte an der Broschüre und ihrem Inhalt vorbe-halten. Kopien unter Nennung des Verfassers sind jedoch willkommen.

 

 

Für Ihr Interesse bedankt sich

 

 

LORENZ & PARTNERS

 

 

 

Inhaltsverzeichnis

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Einleitung…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4

 

  1. Arten von BOI-Anträgen………………………………………………………………………………….. 4

 

III. Förderungsmöglichkeiten/Incentives……………………………………………………….. 5

 

  1. Fiskalische Anreize…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5

 

  1. Sonstige Anreize………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5

 

  1. Allgemeine Voraussetzungen einer BOI-Förderung…………………………. 7

 

  1. Feasibility Study………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8

 

  1. Sonderkriterien für besonders geschützte Bereiche…………………………… 9

 

VII. Sonstige Antragsvoraussetzungen…………………………………………………………….. 9

 

VIII. Zusammenfassung………………………………………………………………………………………… 10

 

 

 

 

Obwohl Lorenz & Partners Co., Ltd. größtmögliche Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in dieser Broschüre bereitgestellten Infor-mationen stets auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass dieser eine indivi-duelle Beratung nicht ersetzen kann. Lorenz & Partners Co., Ltd. übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität, Korrektheit, Vollständigkeit oder Qualität der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Partners Co., Ltd., welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nutzung oder Nichtnutzung der dargebotenen Informati-onen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informationen verursacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausge-schlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners Co., Ltd. kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorliegt.

 

 

 

 

 

Verehrte Leserin, verehrter Leser,

 

es ist sicher nachvollziehbar, dass es großen Aufwand und nicht unerhebli-che Kosten verursacht, Broschüren zu erstellen und auf dem neuesten Stand zu halten.

 

Unseren Mandanten, Verbänden und öffentlichen Organisationen stellen wir die vollständigen Versionen unserer Broschüren gerne kostenlos zur Verfü-gung. Wir bitten aber um Verständnis, dass wir anderen Nutzern eine Kos-tenbeteiligung von 50 EUR berechnen.

 

Sollte Ihr Interesse an diesem Thema geweckt worden sein, senden Sie eine E-Mail an: [email protected] mit der genauen Bezeichnung der Broschüre(n), die Sie erhalten möchten. Wir werden Ihnen diese dann um-gehend zukommen lassen.

 

Mit freundlichen Grüßen

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

Lorenz & Partners

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

Office Information No.: 6 (EN)

 

Guide to

BOI Applications

 

 

 

April 2016

 

 

All rights reserved Ó LORENZ & PARTNERS 2016

 

 

 

 

Dear Reader,

 

A promotion through the Thai Board of Investment (“BOI”) is an interesting and frequently used way for foreign investors to do business in Thailand.

 

Therefore, we have summarized the main requirements for a BOI promotion in this brochure. Nevertheless, BOI applications require diligent preparation, so this brochure is a rough guide with general information.

 

Please also note that despite our best efforts to provide accurate information, we cannot assume any liability for the contents of this brochure. We reserve the copy-right for the brochure and its entire content, but copies under mention of the au-thors are welcome.

 

Thank you for your interest.

 

 

LORENZ & PARTNERS

 

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Introduction……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4

 

  1. Types of BOI Applications…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4

 

III. Incentives……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

 

  1. Tax Incentives……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5

 

  1. Non-tax Incentives…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5

 

  1. General Conditions for BOI Promotion……………………………………………………………………………… 6

 

  1. Feasibility Study…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 7

 

  1. Special Criteria for Restricted Businesses…………………………………………………………………………….. 8

 

VII. Other Conditions……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8

 

VIII. Summary……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8

 

Annex: BOI Application Flowchart………………………………………………………………………………………… 10

 

 

 

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays greatest attention on updating the information provided in this newsletter we cannot take responsibility for the topicality, completeness or quality of the information provided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation. Liability claims regarding dam-age caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, including any kind of information that is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Reader,

 

Keeping brochures up to date involves a lot of effort and considerable cost.

 

The complete version of this brochure is therefore complimentary for our clients, associations and public organisations only. To all other users we charge a cost contribution of 50 EUR. Thank you for your understanding.

 

If this brochure is interesting to you, please contact us by sending an e-mail to: [email protected] naming the brochure(s) you would like to ob-tain.

 

Thank you.

 

Best regards,

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

Lorenz & Partners

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

 

Kanzlei-Information Nr.: 7 (GE)

 

Steuerinformation

 

Thailand / Deutschland

 

 

September 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

All rights reserved Ó LORENZ & PARTNERS 2015

 

Verehrte Leser,

 

das Steuerrecht gehört zu einer der komplexesten und dynamischsten Rechtsmate-rien. Zusätzliche Probleme treten vor allem dann auf, wenn unterschiedliche Län-der auf die Besteuerung Einfluss nehmen. Im schlimmsten Fall erhöht sich die Steuerbelastung dergestalt, dass an mehrere Staaten Steuern gezahlt werden müs-sen. Daher ist das Interesse, die Steuerlast zu minimieren, selbstverständlich.

 

Die vorliegende Broschüre soll einen Überblick über das deutsche und thailändi-sche Einkommen- und Umsatzsteuerrecht sowie über das zwischen beiden Staaten bestehende Doppelbesteuerungsabkommen geben. Daneben bestehende andere Steuerarten mögen am Rande Erwähnung finden, sind aber größtenteils von der Darstellung ausgenommen.

 

Obwohl die Broschüre mit großer Sorgfalt erstellt worden ist, übernehmen wir kei-nerlei Haftung für deren Inhalt. Dies gilt insbesondere vor dem Hintergrund, dass die jeweiligen Regelungen, vor allem in Deutschland, verhältnismäßig schnell geän-dert werden. Aus diesem Grunde kann und will diese Broschüre den fachkundigen, individuellen Rat eines Steuerjuristen/Steuerberaters nicht ersetzen.

 

Gleichzeitig weisen wir darauf hin, dass wir uns bezüglich des Copyrights sämtliche Rechte an der Broschüre und deren Inhalt vorbehalten. Kopien unter Nennung der Verfasser sind jedoch willkommen.

 

Für Ihr Interesse bedankt sich

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inhaltsverzeichnis

 

  1. Deutsches Steuerrecht …………………………………………………………………. 5

 

  • Begriffe und ausgewählte Grundsätze des Steuerrechts im

 

Überblick…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5

 

1.2        Grundsätzliches zur Unternehmensbesteuerung in Deutschland………………………. 8

 

1.3        Steuerpflicht……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 9

 

  • Novellierung des Reisekostenrechts, Verpflegungsmehraufwand

 

und doppelte Haushaltsführung……………………………………………………………………………………….. 13

 

1.5        Einkünfte aus Gewerbebetrieb und selbständiger Tätigkeit……………………………….. 19

 

1.6        Einkünfte aus nichtselbständiger Arbeit……………………………………………………………………….. 20

 

1.7        Einkünfte aus Kapitalvermögen……………………………………………………………………………………….. 21

 

1.8        Vermietung und Verpachtung……………………………………………………………………………………………. 24

 

1.9        Sonstige Einkünfte…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 24

 

1.10     Verlustrückträge………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 24

 

1.11     Erbschaftsteuer und Schenkungsteuer…………………………………………………………………………… 25

 

1.12     Veranlagung bei Ehegatten………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 26

 

1.13     Unternehmensbesteuerung………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 27

 

  1. Thailändisches Steuerrecht……………………………………………………………………………………………. 30

 

2.1        Einkommensteuer für natürliche Personen………………………………………………………………… 30

 

2.2        Die Körperschaftsteuer…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 39

 

2.3        Regelungen für abziehbare Ausgaben……………………………………………………………………………. 41

 

  • Regeln für abziehbare Ausgaben für Wohltätigkeitszwecke,

 

Bildung und Sport…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 41

 

2.5        Quellensteuer………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 42

 

2.6        Dividendenausschüttung………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 52

 

2.7        Stempelsteuer (Stamp Duty)……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 57

 

  1. Die thailändische und die deutsche Umsatzsteuer……………………………………….. 61

 

3.1        Die deutsche Umsatzsteuer…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 61

 

3.2        Die Thailändische VAT…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 65

 

3.3        Beispiele für die thailändische VAT………………………………………………………………………………… 68

 

  1. Das Doppelbesteuerungsabkommen Deutschland/Thailand………………. 71


 

 

 

 

 

 

4.1        Einführung in die Problematik………………………………………………………………………………………….. 71

 

4.2        Besteuerung von natürlichen Personen…………………………………………………………………………. 75

 

4.3        Besteuerung von Unternehmen………………………………………………………………………………………… 86

 

4.4        Mitteilung der Steuerbehörden………………………………………………………………………………………….. 91

 

 

 

 

 

 

Verehrte Leserin, verehrter Leser,

 

es ist sicher nachvollziehbar, dass es großen Aufwand und nicht unerhebli-che Kosten verursacht, Broschüren zu erstellen und auf dem neuesten Stand zu halten.

 

Unseren Mandanten, Verbänden und öffentlichen Organisationen stellen wir die vollständigen Versionen unserer Broschüren gerne kostenlos zur Verfü-gung. Wir bitten aber um Verständnis, dass wir anderen Nutzern eine Kos-tenbeteiligung von 50 EUR berechnen.

 

Sollte Ihr Interesse an diesem Thema geweckt worden sein, senden Sie eine E-Mail an: [email protected] mit der genauen Bezeichnung der Broschüre(n), die Sie erhalten möchten. Wir werden Ihnen diese dann um-gehend zukommen lassen.

 

Mit freundlichen Grüßen

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

Lorenz & Partners

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

 

Kanzlei-Information Nr.: 8 (GE)

 

Management in Thailand

 

Oktober 2014

 

 

 

 

All rights reserved Ó LORENZ & PARTNERS 2014

 

 

Verehrte Leser,

 

wir haben mit dieser Informationsschrift einen kurzen Leitfaden für erfolgreiches Verhalten in der thailändischen Geschäftswelt erarbeitet.

 

LORENZ & PARTNERS ist eine Wirtschaftskanzlei, die fast ausschließlich Investitionsvorhaben deutschsprachiger und sonstiger europäischer mittelständi-scher und Großunternehmen in Südostasien betreut. In diesem Zusammenhang wollen wir Sie über ein angemessenes Verhalten bei Geschäfsverhandlungen, aber auch über Verhaltensweisen im privaten Bereich informieren. Natürlich kann dieser Leitfaden keine umfassende Einführung in die thailändische Kultur bieten, sondern nur einen ersten Einstieg darstellen.

 

Obwohl dieser Überblick mit großer Sorgfalt hergestellt ist, übernehmen wir kei-nerlei Haftung für die Richtigkeit des Inhalts. Sämtliche Rechte am Inhalt behalten wir uns vor. Kopien unter Nennung der Kanzlei sind jedoch willkommen.

 

Für Ihr Interesse bedankt sich

 

Lorenz & Partners

 

 

ã Lorenz & Partners 2014 Seite 2 von 23 Tel.: +66 (0) 2 287 1882 Fax: +66 (0) 2 287 1871 e-mail: [email protected]

 

 

Inhaltsverzeichnis

 

  1. Einleitung: Wirtschaftslage und geschäftliche Chancen in Thailand………………. 5
  2. Geschichte Thailands und deutsch-thailändische Beziehungen………………….. 6
  3. Deutscher Handel mit dem „Land der Freien“……………………………………………. 6
  4. Machtkämpfe im Inneren…………………………………………………………………………….. 6
  5. Der König als Integrationsfigur…………………………………………………………………… 6
  6. Berechenbarkeit und Stabilität der Wirtschaftspolitik…………………………………. 7

III.       Merkmale der thailändischen Wirtschaft……………………………………………………… 7

  1. Das „Image der Deutschen“……………………………………………………………………………. 8
  2. Made in Germany…………………………………………………………………………………………. 8
  3. Fußballstars, Krupp und das deutsche Postsystem……………………………………… 9
  4. Vorurteile gegen Deutsche…………………………………………………………………………… 9
  5. Generelle Verhaltensempfehlungen………………………………………………………………… 9
  6. Das Wertesystem als Grundlage des Handelns……………………………………………. 9
  7. Buddhismus und Gelassenheit…………………………………………………………………….. 9
  8. Hierarchisches Denken in einer Gesellschaft der Ungleichen…………………… 10
  9. Vom Umgang mit Zeit……………………………………………………………………………….. 10
  10. Konfliktvermeidung und Selbstbeherrschung……………………………………………. 10
  11. Der mittlere Pfad………………………………………………………………………………………… 11
  12. Vertrauen schaffen und Referenzen nutzen……………………………………………….. 11
  13. Gesichtswahrung trotz Kritik…………………………………………………………………….. 11
  14. Identitätswahrung trotz Anpassung…………………………………………………………… 12
  15. Verhalten bei bestimmten Anlässen…………………………………………………………… 12
  16. Höflichkeits- und Umgangsformen……………………………………………………………. 12
  17. a) Begrüßung………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12
  18. b) Anrede……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12
  19. c) Austausch der Visitenkarten……………………………………………………………………… 12
  20. d) Sitzhaltung…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 13
  21. e) Intimität in der Öffentlichkeit……………………………………………………………………. 13
  22. f) Gruß- und Glückwunschkarten…………………………………………………………………. 13
  23. Berufliche und private Einladungen…………………………………………………………… 13
  24. a) Pünktlichkeit………………………………………………………………………………………………. 13
  25. b) Taxifahren…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 13
  26. c) Schuhe ausziehen……………………………………………………………………………………….. 14
  27. d) Kopfberührungen……………………………………………………………………………………… 14
  28. e) Achtung vor Buddhafiguren und Portraits der königlichen Familie…………. 14
  29. f) Banketts……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 14
  30. g) Essen in Thailand………………………………………………………………………………………. 14
  31. h) Tabuthemen………………………………………………………………………………………………. 15
  32. i) Als Gastgeber……………………………………………………………………………………………… 15
  33. Geschenke………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 16
  34. a) Kleine Geschenke für alle……………………………………………………………………….. 16

ã Lorenz & Partners 2014                                                Seite 3 von 23

 

Tel.: +66 (0) 2 287 1882    Fax: +66 (0) 2 287 1871     e-mail: [email protected]

 

  1. b) Das Insidergeschenk…………………………………………………………………………………. 16
  2. c) Blumen und Schildkröten………………………………………………………………………….. 16
  3. d) Die Geister milde stimmen……………………………………………………………………….. 17
  4. e) Beziehungen pflegen………………………………………………………………………………….. 17
  5. Kleidung……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 17
  6. a) Kleidung als Statussymbol…………………………………………………………………………. 17
  7. b) Kleidung zu formalen Anlässen………………………………………………………………… 17
  8. c) Kleidung bei privaten Einladungen…………………………………………………………… 17
  9. d) Bekleidung beim Besuch religiöser Stätten……………………………………………….. 18

VII. Verhandlungen……………………………………………………………………………………………… 18

  1. Englisch als Verhandlungssprache…………………………………………………………….. 18
  2. Smalltalk zur Gesprächseröffnung und zum Abschluss…………………………….. 18
  3. Geduld und Gesicht bewahren………………………………………………………………….. 18
  4. Sympathie schaffen durch die Akzeptanz kultureller Unterschiede…………… 19
  5. Scheinbare Zustimmung…………………………………………………………………………….. 19

VIII. Die Vorgesetztenrolle………………………………………………………………………………….. 19

  1. Hohe Anforderungen an Führungspersonal………………………………………………. 19
  2. Entscheidung von oben……………………………………………………………………………… 20
  3. Sich informieren statt informiert werden…………………………………………………… 20
  4. Die Abläufe im Auge behalten…………………………………………………………………… 21
  5. Die Bedeutung guter persönlicher Beziehungen zu den Mitarbeitern……….. 21
  6. Fürsorge und Loyalität……………………………………………………………………………….. 21
  7. Sensible Reaktion auf Kritik……………………………………………………………………….. 22
  8. Erfolg durch Geduld und unterstützende Grundhaltung………………………….. 22
  9. Zusammenfassung………………………………………………………………………………………….. 22

 

 

 

ã Lorenz & Partners 2014 Seite 4 von 23 Tel.: +66 (0) 2 287 1882 Fax: +66 (0) 2 287 1871 e-mail: [email protected]

 

  1. Einleitung: Wirtschaftslage und geschäftliche Chan-cen in Thailand

 

Obwohl die Asienkrise von 1997 die Wirtschaft Thailands zeitweise schrumpfen ließ, gelang Thailand schnell der Umschwung hin zu neuem Wachstum mit einem Plus von 5,3% bereits in 2002. Für 2009 wurde aufgrund der weltweiten Finanzkrise ein negatives Wachstum von ca. -2,4% verzeichnet. Im Jahr 2012 erreichte Thailand trotz eines durch die Schuldenkrise in den westlichen Staaten schwierigen Umfelds ein Wachstum von 6,4%. Im Jahr 2013 wurde das Wachstum durch die schwache Weltkonjunktur und die nachlassende Binnennachfrage gebremst (1. Quartal: 5,4 Prozent, 2. Quartal: 2,8 Prozent; 3. Quartal: 2,7 Prozent; 4. Quartal: 0,6 Prozent). Für das Gesamtjahr betrug das Wachstum 2,9 Prozent. Die Regierung erwartet für 2014 ein Wachstum von 3,6 bis 4,6 Prozent, wobei die Prognosen stark von der Einschätzung der weiteren politischen Entwicklung abhängen.

 

Geschäftliche Möglichkeiten sind somit, trotz aller erforderlichen Vorsicht bei der Wahl der thailändischen Geschäftspartner, in ausreichender Anzahl vorhanden. Dennoch halten sich gerade deutsche Unternehmer im Vergleich zu Japanern und Amerikanern nach wie vor auffällig zurück. Ein Grund hierfür liegt wohl in der ge-ringen Erfahrung vieler deutscher Geschäftsleute im Umgang mit der thailändi-schen Kultur und südostasiatischem Geschäftsgebaren.

 

In der Tat sollte ein Engagement in Thailand gründlich geplant und vorbereitet werden. Die Verhaltensnormen und Tabus des Landes zu kennen, erhöht die Er-folgschancen und verschafft einen klaren Vorsprung vor Mitbewerbern um Aufträ-ge und Partnerschaften.

 

Meistens besteht jedoch nicht die Möglichkeit, sich mit dem geschäftlichen Umfeld in Thailand über längere Zeit hinweg vertraut zu machen. Vielen Geschäftsleuten sind erfahrungsgemäß bereits einige grundlegende Vorabinformationen über die

 

Umstände „vor Ort“ eine große Hilfe, um mit thailändischen Partnern zu einem er-folgreichen Geschäftsabschluss zu kommen.

 

Der vorliegende Leitfaden versucht deshalb, den Blick auf einige entscheidende kul-turelle Unterschiede zu Deutschland zu lenken und deren Hintergrund verständli-cher zu machen. Dazu ist es hilfreich, zunächst einige grundlegende Fakten zur Entwicklung des thailändischen Staates und der Struktur der thailändischen Wirt-schaft darzustellen. In diesen allgemeinen Erläuterungen wird auch kurz auf die Rolle und das Image der Deutschen in Thailand eingegangen. Ab dem 5. Abschnitt folgen dann konkrete Tipps und Hinweise zum angemessenen Verhalten im All-gemeinen und in besonderen Situationen, wie etwa bei Verhandlungen oder im Umgang mit Angestellten.

 

 

ã Lorenz & Partners 2014 Seite 5 von 23 Tel.: +66 (0) 2 287 1882 Fax: +66 (0) 2 287 1871 e-mail: [email protected]

 

  1. Geschichte Thailands und deutsch-thailändische Be-ziehungen

 

  • Deutscher Handel mit dem „Land der Freien“

 

Thailand bedeutet „das Land der Freien“. Die Thailänder sind sehr stolz darauf, in ihrer Geschichte alle Kolonialisierungsversuche von außen erfolgreich abgewehrt zu haben. Die gemeinsame Abwehr dieser Bedrohung spielte auch eine wichtige Rolle bei der Entwicklung der deutsch-thailändischen Freundschaft. Erste diplomatische Beziehungen zwischen beiden Ländern wurden im Jahre 1858 aufgenommen, nachdem auf Initiative der freien Hansestädte Hamburg, Bremen und Lübeck ein Freundschaftsvertrag unterzeichnet und ein hanseatischer Konsul nach Thailand entsandt worden war. Beide Länder profitierten in der Folgezeit von den deutlich intensivierten Handelsbeziehungen. Die Deutschen unterstützten Thailand in der zweiten Hälfte des 19. Jahrhunderts bei der Abwehr mehrerer französischer Kolo-nialisierungsversuche, was die Freundschaft weiter vertiefte. König Chulalongkorn besuchte Deutschland in den Jahren 1897 und 1907. In zahlreichen thailändischen Behörden wurden Deutsche eingesetzt und in eigens dafür eingerichteten Sprach-schulen begannen viele Thailänder, aus freien Stücken Deutsch zu lernen. Nachdem es während der beiden Weltkriege zu einer vorübergehenden Trübung der Bezie-hungen gekommen war, setzte sich der Ausbau der Kontakte danach umso intensi-ver fort. Für zusätzlichen Rückenwind bei der wirtschaftlichen und politischen Annäherung sorgte die deutliche Ausweitung des thailändischen Außenhandels im Anschluss an die Wachstumsperiode seit Beginn der 80er Jahre. Deutschland wurde zu Thailands wichtigstem Handelspartner in Europa.

 

 

  • Machtkämpfe im Inneren

 

Obwohl das Land jeden Vereinnahmungsversuch von außen erfolgreich abwehrte, herrschte nach Innen keineswegs immer Einigkeit. Die politische Machtverteilung war bis in jüngste Zeit wiederholt Anlass zu Auseinandersetzungen zwischen den politisch einflussreichen Gruppierungen. Im Verlauf der zunehmenden Indust-rialisierung und Modernisierung Thailands wurde diese Machtkonstellation immer unzeitgemäßer und scheiterte 1973 schließlich an ihrer Unbeweglichkeit. Seit dem Putsch von 1973 ist die Macht im Wirtschafts- und Gesellschaftssystem Thailands im Wesentlichen auf fünf Schultern verteilt: den König, das Militär, die Bürokratie, die Großunternehmen und die Lobbyverbände. Vorher hatten die Armee und die politische Bürokratie das Land weitgehend allein dominiert.

 

 

  • Der König als Integrationsfigur

 

Heute ist insbesondere der vom Volk verehrte König Bhumipol zu einer Integrati-onsfigur geworden, die der Bevölkerung trotz zahlreicher sowohl demokratischer als auch gewaltsamer Regierungswechsel immer Sicherheit und Kontinuität zu ver-

ã Lorenz & Partners 2014 Seite 6 von 23 Tel.: +66 (0) 2 287 1882 Fax: +66 (0) 2 287 1871 e-mail: [email protected]

 

mitteln wusste. Nach dem Putschversuch von 1991 mussten die Führer von Regie-rung und Militär öffentlich auf den Knien rutschend zu den Schlichtungsgesprä-chen bei ihm erscheinen. Auch im Rahmen der politischen Auseinandersetzungen in 2007, die schliesslich im Putsch gegen die Thaksin Regierung gipfelten nahm der König eine ausgleichende und deeskaliernde Rolle ein.

 

  1. Berechenbarkeit und Stabilität der Wirtschaftspolitik

 

Die Wirtschaftspolitik des Landes ist über alle Regierungen hinweg, abgesehen von einem Einbruch Ende 1997 und der weltweiten Krise 2008, überraschend zuverläs-sig und stabil geblieben, wodurch das wirtschaftliche Wachstum der letzten Jahre erheblich begünstigt und erleichtert wurde. Das Land verfolgt insgesamt einen aus-gesprochen freiheitlichen marktwirtschaftlichen Kurs der auch durch die politischen Querelen der letzten Jahre nicht nachhaltig geändert wurde. Die unternehmerische Initiative kann sich ungehindert entfalten, auch wenn das Investitionsrecht für Aus-länder nach wie vor teils recht antiquierte Regelungen aufweist.

 

Da die Kenntnis der wirtschaftlichen Rahmenbedingungen eine unerlässliche Vo-raussetzung fundierter Managemententscheidungen ist, wird im Folgenden erläu-tert, durch welche Besonderheiten sich die thailändische Wirtschaft auszeichnet.

 

 

III.  Merkmale der thailändischen Wirtschaft

 

Die Struktur der thailändischen Wirtschaft zeichnet sich durch die folgenden sechs Hauptmerkmale aus::

 

Erstens: Großunternehmen spielen bezüglich der Anzahl der dort Beschäftigten und des Investitionsvolumens die mit Abstand wichtigste Rolle.

 

Zweitens: Das Kapital dieser Großunternehmen liegt entweder in der Hand des thailändischen Staates, multinationaler Konzerne oder bei einheimischen privaten Kapitaleignern. Ungefähr 50% des in Thailand investierten Kapitals stammt aus dem Ausland. Dies mag auf den ersten Blick überraschen, denn durch das „Foreign Business Act“ wird die wirtschaftliche Tätigkeit von Ausländern in Thailand of-fiziell auf einen sehr engen Bereich beschränkt. Wie sich in der Praxis jedoch zeigt, eröffnet sich durch das Board of Investment oder geschickt gewählte Gesellschaf-terstrukturen fast immer die Möglichkeit, die gewünschte geschäftliche Tätigkeit ungehindert aufnehmen zu können.

 

Drittens: Großkonzerne schließen sich immer häufiger zu Unternehmens-konglomeraten zusammen.

 

Viertens: Teilt man die thailändische Wirtschaft in die Bereiche Finanzdienstleis-tungen, verarbeitendes Gewerbe und Handel auf, so zeigt sich ein deutliches Über-

 

ã Lorenz & Partners 2014 Seite 7 von 23 Tel.: +66 (0) 2 287 1882 Fax: +66 (0) 2 287 1871 e-mail: [email protected]

 

gewicht des Finanzsektors, das sich primär durch den Erfolg der zahlreichen thai-ländischen Großbanken erklären lässt.

 

Fünftens: Die einheimischen Unternehmen werden zumeist von einer einzelnen Familie oder wenigen kooperierenden Familien geführt. Eine Trennung von Kapi-taleigentum und Verfügungsgewalt über das Unternehmen, wie sie in den meisten deutschen Aktiengesellschaften üblich ist, gibt es nicht. Somit entfällt auch eine Kontrolle des Managements durch etwaige Aktionäre. Häufig kontrolliert das Fami-lienoberhaupt den Großteil der Firmenanteile selbst und regiert autokratisch das ge-samte Unternehmen.

 

Sechstens: Fast alle einflussreichen Personen der thailändischen Wirtschaft sind chinesischer Abstammung und können auf das weltumspannende Netz von Bezie-hungen chinesischer Kaufleute zurückgreifen. Die heutige Unternehmergeneration ist jedoch typischerweise in Thailand geboren und aufgewachsen, spricht Thai und besitzt auch die thailändische Staatsangehörigkeit. Sie hat sich nahezu vollständig assimiliert.

 

 

  1. Das „Image der Deutschen“

 

  1. Made in Germany

 

Von den Deutschen haben die Thailänder ein überaus positives Bild. Deutsche gel-ten als zuverlässig, fleißig und wirtschaftlich erfolgreich. „Made in Germany“ ist ein gern gesehener Qualitätsbeleg. Den Deutschen wird hohe fachliche Kompetenz und – vor allem bei entsprechendem Auftreten – ein hoher gesellschaftlicher Stand zugesprochen, der eine zuvorkommende Behandlung durch die Thailänder erheb-lich begünstigt.

 

  

 

  1. Fußballstars, Krupp und das deutsche Postsystem

 

Leider gibt es nur wenige Deutsche, die den Thailändern namentlich bekannt sind. Eine Ausnahme stellen hier lediglich die deutschen Fußballstars dar, deren kurzfris-tige Auftritte in Thailand schon wahre Volksaufläufe ausgelöst haben. Unbekannt sind leider die wirtschaftshistorische Leistung der Firma Krupp beim Bau des thai-ländischen Eisenbahnnetzes und die maßgebliche Beteiligung deutschen „Know-hows“ beim Aufbau des zuverlässigen thailändischen Postsystems.

 

 

  1. Vorurteile gegen Deutsche

 

Im Allgemeinen treten einem die Thailänder offen und vorurteilsfrei gegenüber. Sensibel sollte man jedoch die ungewollte Bestätigung der folgenden negativen Vorurteile verhindern, denen man in Thailand dennoch mitunter begegnet: Deut-sche gelten bisweilen als übertrieben sparsam, zu direkt, wenig einfühlsam, unflexi-bel und laut. Das deutsche Geschäftsgebaren wirkt auf viele Thailänder zu aktionistisch und ist mit der zurückhaltenden thailändischen Art manchmal nur schwer in Einklang zu bringen. Der Wunsch, sofort „auf den Punkt“ zu kommen, kann einem schnell als versuchte Überrumpelung ausgelegt werden. Berücksichtigt man jedoch die folgenden Hinweise zur generellen Verhaltensweise, wird man gut zu recht kommen.

 

 

  1. Generelle Verhaltensempfehlungen

 

  1. Das Wertesystem als Grundlage des Handelns

 

Um das Verhalten und die Verhaltenserwartungen der Thailänder zu verstehen, ist es zunächst notwendig, sich ihr Wertesystem, die Basis ihres praktischen Handelns genauer anzusehen. Auf dieser Grundlage lassen sich schließlich konkrete Verhal-tensempfehlungen, wie sie in diesem Abschnitt gegeben werden, begründen.

 

 

  1. Buddhismus und Gelassenheit

 

Die Lebenseinstellung der Thailänder ist vom Buddhismus geprägt, dem über 90% der Bevölkerung angehören. Gemäß der buddhistischen Lehre erlebt ein Mensch mehrere Wiedergeburten in jeweils anderer Gestalt. Das Verhalten in früheren Le-ben ist ausschlaggebend dafür, in welcher Position und in welchem Körper man wiedergeboren wird. Jeder ist für sein heutiges Schicksal also gleichsam selbst ver-antwortlich. Dieser Glaube hat für das Alltagsverhalten der Thais und die Einstel-lung zu ihrer Gesellschaft vielfältige Konsequenzen:

 

 

  

Die Armut, von der weite Bevölkerungsteile trotz des Aufschwungs noch immer betroffen sind, wird geduldig ertragen. Das „Karma“ (Schicksal) wird einfach hin-genommen.

 

 

  1. Hierarchisches Denken in einer Gesellschaft der Un-gleichen

 

Folgerichtig werden auch die gesellschaftliche Position, der Einfluss und Reichtum der Oberschicht akzeptiert. Wer Autoritäten und Ranghöhere öffentlich in Frage stellt, gibt sich eher den Geruch eines undankbaren Unruhestifters, als den eines kritischen Geistes. Der Status Quo eines jeden Menschen ist schließlich durch das Wohlverhalten in früheren Leben „verdient“. Deutliche Hierarchieunterschiede stel-len für die Thailänder die „natürliche Ordnung“ der zwischenmenschlichen Bezie-hungen dar. Die westliche Tradition des Egalitarismus, das heißt die Annahme der Gleichheit aller Menschen und das Streben nach Gleichbehandlung, hat sich in Thailand kaum entwickelt. Vielmehr werden die Thailänder dazu erzogen, Rangun-terschiede durch ihr Verhalten jederzeit deutlich werden zu lassen. Der Rang richtet sich traditionell weniger nach Leistung und Kompetenz als nach den Kriterien Al-ter, Abstammung, Dauer der Organisationszugehörigkeit und der „Wertigkeit“ der familiären Beziehungen. Wer zügig und noch jung allein aufgrund seiner Leistung durch die Ränge aufsteigt, hat folglich Probleme, als Autorität akzeptiert zu werden.

 

 

  1. Vom Umgang mit Zeit

 

In Erwartung zahlreicher Wiedergeburten ist für einen überzeugten Buddhisten die Lebenszeit kein knappes Gut, mit dem man umsichtig haushalten müsste. Pünkt-lichkeit und vorausschauendes Planen erscheinen somit als zweitrangig. Da Zeit nicht mit der Begrenztheit eines Menschenlebens in Verbindung gebracht wird, neigen die Thailänder viel weniger als etwa westliche Geschäftsleute zu Ungeduld, Eile und minutiösen Planungen. Wichtig ist ihnen vielmehr, hier und heute soviel

 

Spaß („Sanuk“) wie möglich zu haben, den Augenblick zu genießen. Das erklärt auch die geringe Sparneigung der Thailänder. Sofortiger Konsum erscheint als at-traktivere Alternative.

 

 

  1. Konfliktvermeidung und Selbstbeherrschung

 

Um dem „Nirwana“, der höchsten Stufe der Wiedergeburt näher zu kommen, muss ein Buddhist sich von allen Begierden befreien. Diese werden als die Wurzel allen Übels in der Welt angesehen. Die Thailänder werden deshalb zu einem außerge-wöhnlich hohen Maß an Selbstbeherrschung erzogen. Emotionen werden perma-nent unter Kontrolle gehalten oder dringen zumindest nicht nach außen. Nur selten kommt es zu einem lauten Umgang miteinander oder zu Wutausbrüchen. Vielmehr basieren die thailändischen Sitten und Verhaltensweisen auf dem Respekt vor den Gefühlen der Mitmenschen und dem Wunsch nach sozialer Harmonie. Häufig be-gegnet man in Thailand deshalb Menschen, die über ein hohes psychologisches Einfühlungsvermögen verfügen und sich vor allem durch Freundlichkeit und Höf-lichkeit auszeichnen.

 

 

  1. Der mittlere Pfad

 

Extreme jedweder Art sind gemäß den Lehren des Buddha möglichst zu vermeiden. Stattdessen sollen die Menschen Zurückhaltung und Mäßigung üben, also auf dem „mittleren Pfad“ durch ihr Leben reisen. Der Kompromiss wird zum Wert an sich. Vor diesem Hintergrund sind die folgenden allgemeinen Verhaltensempfehlungen zu verstehen.

 

 

  1. Vertrauen schaffen und Referenzen nutzen

 

Tragfähige geschäftliche Beziehungen können nur langfristig und mit viel Geduld aufgebaut werden. Thailändische Geschäftsleute schließen nur ungern Geschäfte mit wenig bekannten Partnern ab. Zunächst gilt es, eine Vertrauensbasis zu schaf-fen. Die ersten Kontakte vor Ort sollte man sich in jedem Fall von angesehenen ortsansässigen Personen oder Institutionen vermitteln lassen und auf gar keinen Fall unangekündigt ohne Termin in Thailand erscheinen. Gerade zu Beginn einer geschäftlichen Beziehung ist es problematisch, sich auf eigene Briefe, Telefonate und E-mails zu verlassen.

 

 

  1. Gesichtswahrung trotz Kritik

 

Die Grundregel der Geduld gilt auch für den persönlichen Umgang. Es wird als ag-gressiv und flegelhaft empfunden, seinen Ärger ungefiltert nach außen zu tragen. Auch bei wirklichen Ärgernissen sollte man unbedingt die Ruhe bewahren. Dieses Verhalten dient der Verwirklichung eines in ganz Asien geltenden Verhaltensgrund-satzes: Es gilt, sein eigenes Gesicht und das Gesicht des Gegenüber zu wahren. Wer diese Regel missachtet, läuft Gefahr, als Gesprächspartner nicht mehr akzeptiert zu werden. Selbst eine sachlich völlig gerechtfertigte Kritik am Geschäftspartner oder den eigenen thailändischen Mitarbeitern wird – insbesondere wenn sie in Anwesen-heit weiterer Personen stattfindet – als absichtliche Bloßstellung betrachtet und ent-sprechend übelgenommen. Gerade Vorgesetzten wird deshalb aus falscher Rücksichtnahme wichtiges kritisches Feedback gerne vorenthalten, weil die unan-genehme Stellungnahme gescheut wird. So kann mitunter auf wichtige geschäftliche Negativ-Entwicklungen, die eine unverzügliche Entscheidung erfordern würden, nicht rechtzeitig reagiert werden.

 

Es ist deshalb wichtig, dem Verhandlungspartner eine Brücke zu bauen, um ihm erstens berechtigte Kritik und Einwände zu ermöglichen und zweitens, um ihm Kritik an seiner Person oder seinem Unternehmen in für ihn akzeptierbarer Form vortragen zu können. Eine diplomatische Vorgehensweise ist dabei unverzichtbar. Thais versuchen, den offenen Konflikt zu vermeiden.

 

 

 

  1. Identitätswahrung trotz Anpassung

 

Gefragt sind Geduld und Understatement in allen Lebensbereichen, wobei die ei-gene westliche Identität keineswegs durch übermäßige Anpassung preisgegeben werden sollte. Wer versucht, thailändischer als ein Thai zu sein, wird damit keinen Erfolg haben und in den Augen der Thais an Achtung und Faszination eher verlie-ren. Dass einem europäischen Geschäftsmann nicht alle sozialen Verhaltensregeln Thailands bekannt sein können, wird von den Thais durchaus akzeptiert.

 

 

 

 

  1. Verhalten bei bestimmten Anlässen

 

Die soeben skizzierten grundlegenden Verhaltensmuster spielen in alle Lebensbe-reiche hinein. In diesem Abschnitt werden nun die besonderen Verhaltenserwar-tungen in einigen ausgewählten Situationen beschrieben, in denen sich ein Geschäftsmann in Thailand wahrscheinlich häufiger befinden wird.

 

  1. Höflichkeits- und Umgangsformen

 

  1. a) Begrüßung

 

Der traditionelle thailändische Gruß ist der „Wai“. Zur Ausführung des Wais legt man die Handflächen in Brusthöhe wie zum Gebet flach aufeinander und führt ei-ne angedeutete Verbeugung aus. Je tiefer die Verbeugung, desto mehr Respekt wird dem Gegrüßten gegenüber bezeugt. Neben seiner Verwendung als Begrüßungsform wird der „Wai“ noch in einigen anderen Situationen gebraucht. Er kann außerdem bedeuten „Danke“, „Verzeihen Sie, ich habe einen Fehler gemacht“, oder auch „Ich stehe in Ihrer Schuld“. Der hierarchisch Niedrigere grüßt zuerst. In einem sol-chen Fall, etwa wenn das Hotelpersonal mit einem „Wai“ grüßt, erwidert man die-sen Gruß mit einem Lächeln oder Nicken. Nur gegenüber Gleich- oder Höhergestellten wird der Wai erwidert, auf keinen Fall jedoch gegenüber Kindern!

 

Viele thailändische Geschäftsleute haben inzwischen die westliche Gewohnheit übernommen, zur Begrüßung die Hände zu schütteln. Erwarten sollte man es aber nicht.

 

  1. b) Anrede

 

In Thailand ist es üblich, sich mit dem Vornamen anzureden, ohne damit ein Zei-chen besonderer Vertrautheit setzen zu wollen. Seien Sie deshalb nicht überrascht, wenn Ihr Gesprächspartner Sie als „Mr. Hans“ oder „Mr. Heinz“ anredet oder vor-stellt.

 

  1. c) Austausch der Visitenkarten

 

 

Es ist ein unausweichliches Ritual, beim ersten Kontakt mit einem Ge-sprächspartner die Visitenkarten auszutauschen. Eine gute Visitenkarte sollte in Thailand in englischer Sprache, im Idealfall auf der Rückseite auch in thailändischer Sprache verfasst sein und in eindeutiger Weise den Namen der Firma, den Namen des Karteninhabers und vor allem dessen Rang und Bedeutsamkeit erkennen lassen. Bei der Bezeichnung der Position wird in Thailand eher zu dick als zu dünn aufge-tragen. Insbesondere die Bezeichnung „Manager“ wird gerne und häufig vergeben.

 

  1. d) Sitzhaltung

 

Die Füße gelten in Thailand als wenig edles Körperteil. Deshalb lässt man seine Fußspitze nie in die Richtung des Gesprächspartners zeigen und vermeidet am bes-ten ein Übereinanderschlagen der Beine während einer Sitzung. Sitzt man wie beim

 

Besuch eines buddhistischen Tempels („Wat“) auf dem Boden, so ist auf eine Sitz-haltung zu achten, bei der die Füße nicht in die Richtung der thronenden Buddhastatue zeigen.

 

  1. e) Intimität in der Öffentlichkeit

 

Enger körperlicher Kontakt in der Öffentlichkeit ist verpönt. Es gilt als unsittlich, sich in der Öffentlichkeit zu umarmen oder – schlimmer noch – sich zu küssen. Die-se bisweilen übertrieben erscheinende Zurückhaltung beginnt sich in den stark westlich beeinflussten Teilen Bangkoks allerdings bereits deutlich zu lockern.

 

  1. f) Gruß- und Glückwunschkarten

 

Eine große Freude macht man Thailändern, indem man ihnen zu Neujahr eine Glückwunschkarte zukommen lässt. Mit den Karten ruft man sich bei seinen Ge-schäftspartnern und Kunden in Erinnerung und zeigt, dass man niemanden verges-sen hat.

 

 

  1. Berufliche und private Einladungen

 

  1. a) Pünktlichkeit

 

Der westliche Fremde („Farang“) selbst sollte in Thailand pünktlich zu allen Verab-redungen erscheinen, dasselbe Verhalten jedoch nicht von einem Thai erwarten. Leichte, bisweilen auch schwere Verspätungen bis hin zum Nichterscheinen sollten regelmäßig eingeplant werden. Dies gilt insbesondere in der Innenstadt von Bang-kok mit ihren recht unberechenbaren Verkehrsverhältnissen.

 

Die Durchschnittsgeschwindigkeit auf Bangkoks Straßen beträgt ungefähr 15 km/h, weshalb es sich empfiehlt, ein Hotel nahe am Ort der geschäftlichen Tä-tigkeit zu wählen.

 

  1. b) Taxifahren

 

 

Um beim Taxifahren unangenehmen Überraschungen vorzubeugen, empfiehlt sich die Wahl eines Taxameter-Taxis, das durch die entsprechende Aufschrift auf dem Dach sofort als solches zu erkennen ist. Auf das Einschalten des Taxameters sollte man ruhig bestehen.

 

  1. c) Schuhe ausziehen

 

Beim Besuch eines privaten Hauses oder eines buddhistischen Tempels ist es üb-lich, in jedem Fall die Schuhe vor der Tür auszuziehen. Das Haus wird betreten, ohne die Türschwelle dabei zu berühren. Die Schwelle wird von guten Geistern bewohnt, die schlechte Geister am Betreten des Hauses hindern.

 

  1. d) Kopfberührungen

 

Im Haus kann man stürmisch von den Kindern des Gastgebers begrüßt werden. In dieser Situation sollte man dem westlichen Instinkt widerstehen, die Kinder am Kopf anzufassen, da nach dem Glauben der Thais eine Berührung dieses spirituel-len Zentrums den Geist des Kindes verwirren könnte. Falls es in einem unaufmerk-samen Moment dennoch passiert, so sollte man sich nachdrücklich dafür entschuldigen.

 

  1. e) Achtung vor Buddhafiguren und Portraits der königli-chen Familie

 

Häufig befinden sich im Hause Buddhafiguren und Bilder des verehrten Königs Bhumipol und seiner Frau, Königin Sirikit. Sie dürfen nicht berührt werden und müssen mit allerhöchstem Respekt behandelt werden. Insbesondere darf sich der eigene Kopf nie in einer höhergelegenen Position befinden als die Buddhaabbildungen. Sollte das Gespräch den thailändischen König zum Gegen-stand haben, so bedient man sich der Anrede „Seine Majestät König Bhumipol Adulyadij“.

 

  1. f) Banketts

 

Ein Bankett in Bangkok wird wahrscheinlich in einem getäfelten Speisesaal stattfin-den, der gleichzeitig als Bühne für klassische thailändische Folkloretänze dient. Ge-tanzt wird sowohl vor als auch während des Essens, welches normalerweise gegen 20.00 Uhr angesetzt ist. Man wird einen ausländischen Gast an einen Tisch nahe am Geschehen platzieren. Ist das eigentliche Essen beendet, wechselt man nicht den Sitz, um näher beim thailändischen Gastgeber zu sitzen, da dies in den Augen der Thais für den verehrten Gast eine ungebührliche Anstrengung darstellen würde.

 

  1. g) Essen in Thailand

 

Viele Gerichte der thailändischen Küche sind relativ mild und schmeicheln auch dem westlichen Gaumen. Vorsicht ist jedoch bei Gerichten geboten, die mit Chili zubereitet werden, da diese außergewöhnlich scharf sind. Gabel und Löffel werden in Thailand für gewöhnlich den in China üblichen Essstäbchen vorgezogen. Den

 

Löffel nimmt man in die rechte Hand und schiebt mit der Gabel das zumeist be-reits mundfertig zerkleinerte Essen darauf. Aus der in der Mitte des Tisches stehen-den Reisschale darf man sich eigenständig weitere Portionen aufladen oder den Kellner darum bitten, nachdem man ihn mit dezenter Stimme und Gestik auf sich aufmerksam gemacht hat. Wie fast überall auf der Welt macht es auch in Thailand einen guten Eindruck, wenn man die gewählte Portion vollständig verzehrt, um zum einen dem Gastgeber zu schmeicheln und sich zum anderen nicht den Geruch eines Verschwenders zu geben, selbst wenn es sich bei dem Rest „nur“ um die thai-ländische Grundnahrung Reis handeln sollte.

 

  1. h) Tabuthemen

 

Alle wichtigen Themen sollten, wie im Abschnitt über Geschäftsverhandlungen noch genauer zu erläutern sein wird, nie ohne eine unverfängliche Aufwärmphase

 

(„Smalltalk“) angeschnitten werden. Einige Themen sind jedoch so heikel, dass sie besser ganz vermieden werden sollten. Kritik am von den meisten Thailändern hochverehrten König und der Königin ist absolut tabu. Ebenso unpassend wäre es, Kritik an Buddha und seinen Lehren zu üben. Selbst harmlos erscheinende Scherze sind bei diesen Themen völlig fehl am Platze, will man es sich mit seinem Ge-sprächspartner nicht im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes verscherzen.

 

Auf Kritik an ihrem Land, thailändischen Produkten oder sozialen Problemen rea-gieren die Thailänder häufig überempfindlich, da sie einen starken, wenn auch nicht aggressiven Nationalstolz empfinden. Es empfiehlt sich deshalb, auf keinen Fall wie ein Missionar oder Kolonialherr aufzutreten und zu urteilen.

 

Das Thema Politik birgt wie fast überall viel Zündstoff und sollte nach Möglichkeit vermieden werden. Dies gilt seit dem Militaerputsch vom Mai 2014 umso mehr. Be-steht dennoch die Gefahr, auf diesen Themenbereich angesprochen zu werden, so ist es zumindest notwendig, sich vorab genau über das aktuelle Geschehen zu in-formieren.

 

Empfindlich reagieren viele Thailänder auch, wenn es um Prostitution geht. Einer-seits herrscht in der Bevölkerung große Verärgerung darüber, wie wenig die bisheri-gen Regierungen gegen die Prostitution unternommen haben. Andererseits scheinen auch sehr viele von der (ver-)käuflichen Liebe zu profitieren, da sie sonst niemals eine solch starke Verbreitung hätte finden können.

 

  1. i) Als Gastgeber

 

Lädt man als Gastgeber Thailänder zu sich nach Hause ein, so bedarf es der Ein-haltung einiger wichtiger Regeln. Verzichtet man darauf, so besteht die Gefahr, dass von den Thailändern trotz Zusage niemand erscheint. Dies hat nichts mit einer be-wussten Geringschätzung des Gastgebers zu tun, sondern eher mit dem Charakter solcher Feiern in den eigenen vier Wänden, die allzu oft nicht der thailändischen Vorstellung von einem unterhaltsamen Abend entsprechen. Es wird viele Stunden lang nur Englisch gesprochen und dazu noch mit Leuten, die der Thailänder kaum kennt. Die Tischregeln sind aus thailändischer Sicht möglicherweise zu formal und undurchschaubar. Außerdem trifft auch das westliche Essen (z.B. Käse, Aal, Blut-

 

wurst) nicht immer ihren Geschmack. Thailänder treffen sich lieber mit guten Be-kannten in ihrem Lieblingsrestaurant, wo sie sich sicherer fühlen und über ihre Verweildauer ungezwungener selbst entscheiden können. Dennoch sagen sie dem Gastgeber aus dem thailändischen Verständnis von Höflichkeit heraus bisweilen auch dann zu, wenn sie gar nicht wirklich vorhaben zu erscheinen. Dann ist die

 

„Überraschung“ des Gastgebers perfekt. Die Chance auf eine Feier mit vielen thai-ländischen Gästen steigt aber, wenn folgende Regeln eingehalten werden: Einladungen müssen den Thais persönlich überreicht werden. Man sollte sicherstel-len, dass ein oder zwei bedeutende Thais definitiv erscheinen werden. Dies sichert den Unentschlossenen mindestens einen interessanten thailändischen Ge-sprächspartner und schließt somit das Risiko aus, den Abend als einziger Thai in der Runde bestreiten zu müssen.

 

Die Gäste sollten sofort nach ihrer Ankunft dazu ermuntert werden, sich zu vermi-schen und allen anderen Gästen zumindest vorgestellt werden. So entsteht eine of-fenere und vertrauensvollere Atmosphäre.

 

Für reichlich Essen und Trinken sollte im Vorhinein garantiert werden. Der Beginn des vorzugsweise im Buffetstil zu servierenden Essens ist möglichst früh anzuset-zen.

 

 

  1. Geschenke

 

  1. Kleine Geschenke für alle

 

Der Ritus des Schenkens ist in Thailand weitgehend verwestlicht und frei von den meisten Formalitäten, die ihn in anderen Teilen Asiens zu einer delikaten Angele-genheit werden lassen. Im Allgemeinen sollte man jedem, mit dem man in perma-nentem Kontakt steht, einschließlich dem Postboten, dem Türsteher und der Empfangsdame etwas mitbringen, gerade wenn man sich längere Zeit an einem be-stimmten Ort aufhält. Dabei sollte man niemanden vergessen! Die meisten Ge-schenke dürfen ruhig klein sein – Bücher, Firmenkalender, Kugelschreiber, Taschenrechner und ähnliches. Die Verpackung ist zwar nicht unwichtig, sie spielt in Thailand aber keine so große Rolle wie andernorts in Asien.

 

  1. b) Das Insidergeschenk

 

Präsente, die den Empfänger als „sophisticated“ erscheinen lassen, ihn also als „Kenner“ eines bestimmten Gebietes ausweisen, hinterlassen einen guten Eindruck. Es lohnt sich, über ein passendes Geschenk ein paar Gedanken zu verlieren.

 

  1. c) Blumen und Schildkröten

 

Blumen sollten als Gastgeschenk nicht regelmäßig mitgebracht werden, sie sind eher ein bei Krankenhausbesuchen beliebtes Geschenk. An Geburtstagen ist es nicht üblich, sich zu beschenken. Bei betagteren Personen kann man eine stilisierte Schildkröte als Symbol für ein langes Leben schenken.

 

  1. d) Die Geister milde stimmen

 

Sind Sie Gast bei einer wie auch immer gearteten religiösen Zeremonie, wird es gerne gesehen, wenn Sie einen Umschlag mitbringen, der einen Gegenwert von un-gefähr 5 – 8 EUR enthält. Dieses Geschenk übergeben Sie dem Veranstalter der Zeremonie, um sich mit den Geistern gut zustellen und zur Finanzierung der Ver-anstaltung beizutragen.

 

  1. e) Beziehungen pflegen

 

Zur Pflege einer guten Geschäftsbeziehung ist es in Thailand durchaus angebracht, sich für eine langfristig gute Zusammenarbeit regelmäßig durch kleinere Aufmerk-samkeiten zu revanchieren. Üblich ist etwa eine Flasche guten Whiskeys. Doch hängt der Wert des „angemessenen“ Geschenks immer auch vom eigenen Status ab. Von ranghöheren Personen werden tendenziell wertvollere Geschenke erwartet als von rangniedrigeren Personen. Außerdem spielen natürlich auch die Güte und Dauer der Beziehung und der Rang des Beschenkten eine Rolle.

 

 

  1. Kleidung

 

  1. a) Kleidung als Statussymbol

 

Seit jeher ist die Kleidung in Thailand – anders als in der westlichen Kultur – ein sehr zuverlässiger Indikator für den gesellschaftlichen Stand einer Person gewesen. Die thailändische Gesellschaft ist historisch im Wesentlichen in zwei Klassen, die gebildete Oberschicht und den Rest des Volkes, aufgeteilt. Erst seit Anfang der 80er Jahre bildet sich in Bangkok und wenigen Großstädten eine kaufkräftige, gut ausgebildete Mittelschicht heraus. Bei formalen Anlässen sollte die Garderobe des-halb den eigenen Status möglichst vorteilhaft und seriös erscheinen lassen – je wohlhabender, desto besser. Hier würde man an der falschen Stelle sparen.

 

So    kommt    es     insbesondere    bei     formalen    Anlässen    regelmäßig    zu     einem

„Overdressing“ für das vorherrschende schwül-heiße tropische Klima. Die Folge sind mitunter hohe Flüssigkeitsverluste, die jeder Beteiligte, um dem Protokoll Ge-nüge zu tun, wohl oder übel durchstehen muss.

 

  1. b) Kleidung zu formalen Anlässen

 

In der Chefetage zum geschäftlichen Gespräch wie auch zum Essen trägt man ei-nen Anzug in gedeckten Farben und Krawatte; im Arbeitsalltag sind Hemd und Krawatte ausreichend. Wegen der hohen Bedeutung korrekter Kleidung in Thailand wählt man im Zweifelsfall das feinere Tuch.

 

 

  1. c) Kleidung bei privaten Einladungen

 

Bei privaten Einladungen kann ein Mann ein gutes Hemd ohne Krawatte tragen, wobei Seide den Geschmack der Thais besonders gut treffen wird. Auch bei priva-

 

ten Kontakten ist aber großer Wert auf eine sehr gepflegte Kleidung und ein insge-samt gepflegtes Äußeres zu legen. Das typische Erscheinungsbild eines Touristen (Shorts und T-Shirt) macht keinen guten Eindruck und erhöht darüber hinaus den Belästigungsdruck durch Schlepper und fliegende Händler aller Art.

 

  1. d) Bekleidung beim Besuch religiöser Stätten

 

Die Farben Schwarz und Weiß werden mit dem Tod in Verbindung gebracht und sollten außer auf Beerdigungen gemieden werden.

 

Wichtig ist eine angemessene Bekleidung vor allem beim Besuch religiöser Stätten, auch wenn diese ein beliebtes Touristenziel sind. Ein nackter Oberkörper und kurze Hosen gelten als nicht akzeptabel. Wie beim Betreten privater Wohnräume entle-digt man sich auch vor dem Betreten eines buddhistischen Tempels seines Schuh-werks. Vor den heiligen Stätten werden eigens dafür große Schuhregale aufgestellt.

 

 

VII. Verhandlungen

 

  1. Englisch als Verhandlungssprache

 

Die meisten Geschäftsverhandlungen müssen auf Englisch geführt werden, denn Deutsch spricht in Thailand fast niemand. Bei wichtigen Vertragsabschlüssen kann es ratsam sein, einen Dolmetscher zu engagieren, um das Risiko eines sprachlichen Missverständnisses möglichst gering zu halten.

 

 

  1. Smalltalk zur Gesprächseröffnung und zum Abschluss

 

Auch bei Geschäftsverhandlungen ist der oben beschriebene Stil zu bevorzugen. Zunächst kommt man sich bei ein paar Minuten unkomplizierten Geplauders näher und mit ebensolchem wird die Gesprächsrunde auch beendet. Dazwischen trägt man den Kern seines Anliegens oder seiner Argumentation nüchtern und emoti-onslos vor. Auf keinen Fall ist es hingegen ratsam, ohne Umschweife zur Sache kommen zu wollen. Ein Thailänder würde sich davon unter Druck gesetzt fühlen.

 

 

  1. Geduld und Gesicht bewahren

 

Auch direkte Kritik oder offener Widerspruch sind bei Verhandlungen tabu. Ein Thailänder fühlt sich in einer konfliktbeladenen Atmosphäre nicht wohl. Dement-sprechend ist es zumeist auch nicht erfolgversprechend, durch Druck ans Ziel ge-langen zu wollen. Vielmehr braucht man viel Geduld, Stehvermögen und viele Anläufe, bis ein Projekt schließlich vonstatten gehen kann.

 

Wie in allen anderen Lebensbereichen ist auch bei Verhandlungen von zentraler Bedeutung, den Gesprächspartner sein Gesicht wahren zu lassen. Bieten Sie ihm deshalb eine Brücke an, wenn er sich offensichtlich getäuscht oder einen Fehler gemacht hat.

 

 

 

  1. Sympathie schaffen durch die Akzeptanz kultureller Unterschiede

 

Viel Sympathie kann man auf sich ziehen, indem man sich ein paar Sätze Thailän-disch aneignet, was allerdings kein ganz einfaches Unterfangen ist. Die Thailänder fühlen sich jedoch von der Mühe und der offensichtlichen Anerkennung ihres Kul-turgutes sehr geschmeichelt. Nicht nur bei Verhandlungen wird es gerne gesehen, wenn man die thailändische Kultur respektiert und die bestehenden Unterschiede zur westlichen Kultur nicht als „soziale Etikette“ abtut. Die Thailänder verzeihen einem dann im Gegenzug auch die meisten unabsichtlich begangenen Tabubrüche.

 

 

  1. Scheinbare Zustimmung

 

Vorsicht ist geboten, wenn ein Thailänder zu den im Gespräch vermeintlich ge-troffenen Übereinkünften sein Einverständnis zu geben scheint und zu allem je-weils „ja“ bzw. „yes“ sagt oder zustimmend lächelt. Dieses „yes“ oder Lächeln kann vieles bedeuten. Es könnte zum Beispiel sein, dass der Thailänder vom Ge-sprächsinhalt recht wenig verstanden hat und durch seine zustimmende Reaktion lediglich sein Gesicht zu wahren versucht. Außerdem wäre es möglich, dass der

 

Thailänder das zu konfrontative Tabuwort „no“ vermeiden möchte und das „yes“ in einer Art und Weise vorbringt, aus welcher ein kundiger Zuhörer die Ablehnung unmissverständlich entnehmen würde. Denkbar wäre auch eine Erklärung des

 

„yes“ durch eine zu direkte Übersetzung des thailändischen Wortes „khrap“, wel-ches in diesem Zusammenhang soviel bedeuten kann wie: „Ich nehme zur Kennt-nis, dass Sie gerade etwas zu mir gesagt haben“. Folglich sollte man sich genau vergewissern, wie die zunächst eindeutig erscheinende Zustimmung des thailändi-schen Gesprächspartners tatsächlich zu verstehen ist, um sich die bisweilen gar ge-richtliche Auseinandersetzungen zu ersparen, die durch Missverständnisse provo-ziert werden können.

 

 

VIII. Die Vorgesetztenrolle

 

  1. Hohe Anforderungen an Führungspersonal

 

Auch beim Umgang mit Mitarbeitern sind die kulturellen Besonderheiten Thailands zu berücksichtigen. Aufgrund der starken Betonung hierarchischer Unterschiede hat ein Vorgesetzter eine Rolle auszufüllen, die weit über diejenigen Anforderungen in der westlichen Kultur hinausgeht. Vom Chef wird nicht nur eine umfassende Kompetenz in allen fachlichen Belangen erwartet, sondern auch eine intensive per-sönliche Betreuung aller Mitarbeiter.

 

 

  1. Entscheidung von oben

 

In der thailändischen Gesellschaft war es traditionell nie üblich, Ent-scheidungskompetenz an untere hierarchische Ränge zu delegieren. Das im Westen verbreitete Streben, die Distanz zu den Mitarbeitern (nicht: „Untergebenen“) so ge-ring wie zur Führung gerade nötig zu halten, widerspricht der thailändischen Nei-gung, soziale Rangunterschiede nach außen bewusst zu betonen. Eine Kultur des

 

„Management-by-delegation“, eine bewusste Übertragung von Entscheidungsbe-fugnissen von oben nach unten, existiert in Thailand nicht. Vielmehr wird vom Vorgesetzten erwartet, dass er die Entscheidungen in einer Art und Weise trifft, die man in Deutschland als autokratisch oder sogar autoritär bezeichnen würde. Der Rat der Mitarbeiter wird vor einer Entscheidung zwar vorher durchaus eingeholt.

 

Doch muss die „Last“ der Entscheidung auf den Schultern des Chefs verbleiben.

Auch die von westlichen Managementschulen propagierte Entscheidungsfindung in Teams ist in Thailand nur sehr beschränkt anwendbar.

 

 

  1. Sich informieren statt informiert werden

 

Aus westlicher Perspektive handelt es sich gleichsam um eine „Delegation von un-ten nach oben“, also vom Mitarbeiter zum Vorgesetzten. Selbst im Westen wäre es schwer, unter diesen Bedingungen zu qualitativ hochwertigen Entscheidungen zu gelangen, hat sich doch herausgestellt, dass insbesondere bei komplexen Sachver-halten die Entscheidungsqualität mit der Anzahl der eingebrachten Ideen und Er-fahrungen erheblich ansteigt. In Thailand kommt jedoch eine weitere Erschwernis hinzu: Die Kommunikationskanäle verlaufen in der thailändischen Gesellschaft fast ausschließlich von oben nach unten. Schon in der Schule werden die Thais dazu er-zogen, zu akzeptieren, was ihnen präsentiert wird und auszuführen, was man ihnen sagt. Autoritäten und Meinungen in Frage zu stellen und seine eigene Meinung dar-zulegen, steht nicht auf dem Lehrplan. Deshalb verfügen viele Thais über keinerlei Training in der Darstellung eigener Standpunkte, im Anbringen von Kritik und im Argumentieren. Das bekommt auch ein Vorgesetzter schnell zu spüren, wenn er vergeblich darauf wartet, von seinen Mitarbeitern über das aktuelle Geschehen im Betrieb und auf den Märkten informiert zu werden. Stattdessen wird es als ureigene Aufgabe des Chefs angesehen herauszufinden, was innerhalb und außerhalb des

 

Unternehmens vor sich geht. Die Information ist eine „Holschuld“ des Vorgesetz-ten, keine „Bringschuld“ des Mitarbeiters. Ein gewichtiger Grund, dem Vorgesetz-ten gerade negative Informationen vorzuenthalten, ist auch im Bestreben der Thailänder zu sehen, angespannte Situationen aus Rücksichtnahme zu vermeiden. Dieses Verhalten lässt sich möglicherweise abmildern, indem man die Mitarbeiter ausdrücklich von der Verpflichtung zu dieser Art der Rücksichtnahme („Kreng Jai“) entbindet und einen freieren Informationsfluss bewusst fördert: „You don’t have to kreng jai me.“ Ganz werden die Thailänder dennoch nicht auf die Anwendung die-ses Grundwerts ihrer Kultur verzichten. Im besten Fall werden sie ihn etwas zu-rückhaltender anwenden.

 

 

Viele wichtige Informationen werden von den Thais nur durch Mimik und Gestik, also auf non-verbaler Ebene kommuniziert. Als Vorgesetzter sollte man einen fei-nen Blick selbst für leichte Variationen und Veränderungen des Gesichtsausdrucks und der Körperhaltung entwickeln, um auch nicht laut ausgesprochene Botschaften zu hören und indirekte Botschaften richtig interpretieren zu können.

 

 

  1. Die Abläufe im Auge behalten

 

Der Vorgesetzte ist folglich gezwungen, den erwünschten Betriebsablauf stets im Auge zu behalten und die rechtzeitige Durchführung seiner Anweisungen regelmä-

 

ßig selbst zu kontrollieren. Der Grundsatz „Vertrauen ist gut, Kontrolle ist besser“ ist in Thailand durchaus angebracht, liegt doch durch die Zentralisierung der Ent-scheidungskompetenz auch die Verantwortung für das Betriebsergebnis allein in den Händen des Chefs. Im Bewusstsein der thailändischen Mitarbeiter ist das Ge-fühl für individuelle Verantwortlichkeiten in ihrem Bereich hingegen nur schwach ausgeprägt.

 

Wie sich zeigt, ist ein Vorgesetzter schon durch die Pflicht zur detaillierten Anwei-sung und Kontrolle auf der fachlichen Ebene recht stark belastet. Zusätzlich wird von ihm jedoch auch erwartet, seinen Mitarbeitern in persönlicher Hinsicht eine Stütze zu sein.

 

 

  1. Die Bedeutung guter persönlicher Beziehungen zu den Mitarbeitern

 

Für die Arbeitsmotivation eines Thailänders ist es enorm wichtig, über gute persön-liche Beziehungen zu seinen Kollegen und seinem Vorgesetzten zu verfügen. Wäh-rend in westlichen Unternehmen häufig eine eher individualistische Grundhaltung vorherrscht, sind die Thailänder stark gruppenorientiert und investieren viel Zeit und Mühe in den Aufbau und Erhalt tragfähiger Kontakte zu den anderen Be-triebsangehörigen. Man kümmert sich intensiv um das Wohlergehen der Kollegen auch auf privater Ebene. Insbesondere vom Vorgesetzten wird eine beinahe väterli-che Zuwendung erwartet. Der Vorgesetzte sollte sich deshalb über die wichtigsten familiären Verwicklungen seiner Mitarbeiter in Kenntnis setzen und ihnen bei Problemen mit Wort und Tat zur Seite stehen. Dabei ist es durchaus üblich, Einla-dungen zu sehr privaten Anlässen (z.B. Beerdigungen, Hochzeiten, Geburtstagen) wahrzunehmen und den Gastgeber durch die Anwesenheit des honorigen Gastes zu ehren und – im Trauerfall – emotional zu unterstützen.

 

 

 

 

  1. Fürsorge und Loyalität

 

Als Dank für solch umfassende Fürsorge wird dem Vorgesetzten im Gegenzug ein sehr starkes „Commitment“ und ein hohes Maß an Loyalität von den Mitarbeitern entgegengebracht. Loyalität wird von den Thailändern nicht gegenüber Organisati-

 

onen entwickelt, sondern gegenüber Personen. Die Motivation und Arbeitszufrie-denheit der Thais steht und fällt mit der Beziehung zum allmächtigen Vorgesetzten. Da ein funktionierendes staatliches Sozialsystem in Thailand bisher nicht existiert, ist der Einzelne im Krisenfall auf die Unterstützung seiner unmittelbaren Um-gebung angewiesen. Die einzige Möglichkeit aufgefangen zu werden, besteht somit in der Hilfeleistung von Freunden und Kollegen.

 

 

  1. Sensible Reaktion auf Kritik

 

Die enge persönliche Beziehung zum Mitarbeiter hat jedoch auch ihre Schattensei-ten. Da jede berufliche Beziehung in Thailand eine starke persönliche Komponente besitzt, wird auch Kritik an der Arbeit eines thailändischen Mitarbeiters schnell per-sönlich genommen. Eine „rein fachliche“ Beurteilung ist kaum möglich. Die in der westlichen Geschäftswelt weithin akzeptierte Auffassung von der konstruktiven Funktion der Kritik als Mittel zur Verbesserung und Weiterentwicklung ist in der thailändischen Kultur nur schwach verbreitet. Deshalb lässt sich ein „Management-by-objectives“ (Führung durch Zielvereinbarung) mit regelmäßigen Personalbeurtei-lungsgesprächen in Thailand nicht durchführen. Das Verfahren wäre für die thai-ländische Mentalität viel zu druckorientiert und konfrontativ. Der durch ein solches Vorgehen möglicherweise bewusst induzierte Arbeitsstress würde keineswegs unbe-dingt eine Leistungssteigerung nach sich ziehen. Viel eher besteht die Gefahr, dass sich der Thailänder in einer Stress-Situation ganz bewusst auf den „mittleren Pfad“ zurückzieht, jede Überlastung demonstrativ vermeidet und von dieser Arbeitsweise auf absehbare Zeit auch nicht mehr abrückt.

 

 

  1. Erfolg durch Geduld und unterstützende Grundhal-tung

 

Bei der Beurteilung der Leistung eines thailändischen Mitarbeiters ist immer zu be-rücksichtigen, wie relativ kurz der enorme wirtschaftliche Aufschwung Thailands eigentlich erst anhält und welch große Lernprozesse die Bevölkerung in dieser Zeit bereits bewältigt hat. Eine Produktivität und Arbeitsqualität, die einem Westeuropä-er noch deutlich steigerungsfähig erscheinen mag, stellt für einen Thai vielleicht (vorläufig) ein nicht für erreichbar gehaltenes Maximum dar. Das Verstehen und Erlernen der in Europa über lange Zeit gewachsenen marktwirtschaftlichen Institu-tionen und Verhaltensweisen kann nicht von heute auf morgen vonstatten gehen. Mit einer geduldigen und unterstützenden Grundhaltung lässt sich dennoch fast al-les erreichen.

 

  1. Zusammenfassung

 

Die erste Durchführung eines Investmentvorhabens in Thailand stellt den deut-schen Unternehmer vor eine Vielzahl von bisher unbekannten Problemen rechtli-cher, aber auch kultureller Art. Die kulturellen Unterschiede zwischen der

 

deutschen und der thailändischen Nationalität spielen außer in dem privaten Um-feld des in Thailand agierenden Unternehmers auch im Geschäftsleben eine wichti-ge Rolle. Denn das geschäftliche Gebaren von etwaigen thailändischen Geschäftspartnern als auch thailändischen Mitarbeitern wird in großen Teilen vom kulturellen Hintergrund bestimmt. Deshalb ist jedem europäischen Unternehmer, der sich in Thailand geschäftlich betätigen will, anzuraten, sich bereits im Vorfeld mit der Kultur und Geschichte der Thais zu befassen, um unnötige Missverständ-nisse, die das Vorhaben zurückwerfen könnten, zu vermeiden. Soweit die wenigen Regeln im Umgang miteinander beachtet werden, steht einer erfolgreichen und in-tensiven wirtschaftlichen Zusammenarbeit zwischen Thailändern und ausländi-schen Investoren nichts mehr im Weg.

 

 

 

 

Wir hoffen, dass wir mit vorliegenden Informationen hilfreich sein können. Sollten Sie weitere Fr a-gen haben, so setzen Sie sich bitte mit uns in Verbindung.

 

LORENZ & PARTNERS Co., Ltd. 27th Floor Bangkok City Tower 179 South Sathorn Road

 

Bangkok 10120, Thailand

 

Tel.: +66 (0) 2-287 1882

 

Fax: +66 (0) 2-287 1871 E-Mail: [email protected]

 

 

 

 

Obwohl Lorenz & Partners Co., Ltd. größtmögliche Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in dieser Broschüre bereitgestellten In-formationen stets auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass dieser eine in-dividuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen kann. Lorenz & Partners Co., Ltd. übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität, Korrektheit, Vollständigkeit oder Qualität der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Partners Co., Ltd., welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nutzung oder Nichtnutzung der dar-gebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informationen verursacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners Co., Ltd. kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschul-den vorliegt.

 

 

 

 

error: Sorry, this information cannot be copied / printed. If you would like to received the text as pdf, please send us an e-mail.