General Meetings of Directors and

 

Shareholders of a Private Hong Kong

 

Company

 

June 2014

 

 

 

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information provid-ed. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qual-ified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, includ-ing any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliber-ately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

  1. Introduction

 

Every company is required by law to con-duct an Annual General Meeting (“AGM”) of shareholders (Section 610 of the new Hong Kong Companies Ordinance1 (“CO

 

– Chap 622)). The first AGM should be held within 18 months of incorporation. Each subsequent AGM should be held within 15 months of the previous AGM. In practice, most companies hold their AGM at the same time each year; e.g. every first Monday in March. Section 565 and 576 CO provides that the exact time and location of the AGM is decided by the company’s Directors.

 

The AGM provides the shareholders with an opportunity to question the Directors on any matter, but in particular on the com-pany’s accounts and audit report, which are usually presented at the meeting.

 

The business of the AGM may include de-ciding upon the distribution of dividends, electing new Directors and appointing audi-tors. The AGM can be held, either by way of a traditional in-person meeting or in the form of written resolutions.

  1. Convention of an AGM

 

It is the Directors’ responsibility to convene an AGM every year. The Directors are re-quired to give 21 days notice to the share-holders of the proposed AGM date. The AGM notice must contain sufficient material and particulars to enable any shareholder to decide whether the proposed resolutions for the AGM would affect their interests. (Hong Kong Racing Pigeon Association Ltd. v. Lam Koon

1 All Sections cited in this Newsletter do make refer-ence to the new Companies Ordinance which came into force 3 March 2014.

 

 

Nam (2002) 3 HKLRD 133, Section 576 (1) (e), (3), (4), (5) and (7) CO)

 

Further the shareholders must be able to see and understand the entire AGM process and all the decisions that are proposed, prior to the actual AGM. If a Special Resolution is to be passed at the AGM, then the precise wording of this resolution must be cited in the AGM notice.

 

If the Directors fail to call an AGM within the required time then any shareholder can ask the court to call the AGM. Further the Director(s) in question and the company it-self may have to pay a fine as the result of this failure.

  1. Extraordinary General Meetings

 

In addition to the AGM the shareholders may hold other meetings throughout the year as and when required. These meetings are called “Extraordinary General Meetings” (“EGM”). An EGM may be convened at the request of:

 

  • The Directors (Cap 622H Compa-nies (Model Articles) Notice, Sched-ule 1, Sec 38 (2); Schedule 2 Sec 34 (2));

 

  • The shareholders (Section 569 (1) CO at least, however, 2 representing at least 10 % of the total voting rights);

 

  • The auditors (421 CO);

 

  • The liquidators; or

 

  • By a Court order (570 CO).

 

 

The notice period for an EGM is 14 days unless the Articles of Association require a longer time.

 

then he is not eligible to vote at an AGM or EGM.

  1. Proxy


 

  1. Proceedings at Company Meet-ings

 

The way in which business is conducted at a company meeting is determined by the CO and by the Articles of the company. The procedure can also be decided during the meeting itself. Please note that the following information applies equally to AGMs, EGMs and Board of Director (“BoD”) meetings

  1. Quorum

 

No business can be conducted at a meeting unless a quorum is present for the entire du-ration of the meeting (Cap 622H Companies (Model Articles) Notice, Schedule 1 Sec 43 (2); Schedule 2, Sec 39 (2)). Two members who are present in person or by proxy shall be a quorum (Cap 622, Section 585 (3)).

 

If a quorum is not present within 30 minutes of the appointed time for opening the meet-ing then the meeting will be adjourned for 7 days or as otherwise decided by the Di-rectors. If at the adjourned meeting a quo-rum is not present within 30 minutes of the appointed time then the members which are present will constitute a quorum (Cap 622H Companies (Model Articles) Notice, Sched-ule 1 Sec 46; Schedule 2, Sec 42).

  1. Chairman

 

Unless the company’s articles provide other-wise any member may be elected as the Chairman of the meeting by the other atten-dees (Section 586 (1) CO). The Chairman of the meeting will be elected at the meeting. The powers of the Chairman are set out in the company’s articles however, at common law the Chairman must ensure that all enti-tled persons are given a reasonable oppor-tunity to debate and vote. If the Chairman is a member of the BoD but not a shareholder

 

Any member of the company is entitled to appoint another person, whether a member or not, as his proxy to attend and vote in his place. The proxy also has the same right to speak at the meeting on the appointing member’s behalf (Section 596 CO). The member’s right to appoint a proxy must be stated in the notice for the meeting.

 

A member may appoint multiple proxies to represent whatever number of shares is specified in the instrument of appointment (Section 596 CO). The proxy’s appointment may be permanent i.e. the proxy may act as such at all company meetings. A permanent proxy is sometimes described as a general proxy. However, if the articles of a company specify the form for appointment of a proxy and that form does not provide for perma-nent appointments then the proxy will only be empowered to act at the single meeting which is specified in the form.

 

Unless the company’s articles of the com-pany provide otherwise, a proxy cannot par-ticipate in a show of hands vote (Section 588

 

(2) CO). The instrument appointing the proxy is therefore deemed to confer au-thority to demand or to join in demanding a poll vote (Section 591 (3)). If a shareholder has appointed a proxy but exercises his right to vote in person, the proxy is revoked. The proxy is merely the agent of the member who appoints him and that agency can be terminated at any time unless it has been agreed that the proxy is irrevocable. Even if the proxy has been given for a fixed period of time, the member is still entitled to re-ceive notice of all meetings during that peri-od.

 

 

  1. Voting

 

(1) Voting by hands

 

At any meeting, a resolution which is put to the vote of the members is decided on a show of hands unless a poll vote is de-manded before or on the declaration of the result (Section 591 (1) CO). On a show of hands, every member present in person has one vote irrespective of the number of shares he holds (Section 588 (1) CO). A proxy usually cannot vote on a show of hands.

 

(2) Demanding a poll vote

 

may provide less stringent requirements for calling a poll vote than those provided by the CO, but they may not impose require-ments which are more stringent. The Chair-man may also demand a poll vote.

 

In a poll vote every member shall have one vote for each share that he holds. A member who is entitled to more than one vote does not have to use all of his votes in the same way (Section 593 CO). For example a mem-ber may cast some of his votes for one Di-rector Candidate and some for another. The votes may be cast personally or by proxy

 

(3) Casting vote

 

 

Under the CO all proposals put to the meet-ing, except for the election of the Chairman and adjournment of the meeting may be de-cided by a poll vote. A company’s articles

 

If there is an equality of votes, whether on a show of hands or on a poll vote then the Chairman of the meeting has the casting vote.

 

 

 

How to Inherit Shares in A Hong Kong Company and Enforce Certain Shareholder Rights

 

June 2014

 

All rights reserved © LORENZ & PARTNERS 2014

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information provided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, including any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

  1. Introduction

The loss of a loved one is always emotion-ally difficult. However when the deceased was a corporate shareholder then their pass-ing can lead to legal and business difficulties as well. This newsletter is designed to pro-vide some introductory information about:

 

  • How to enforce the right to inherit of shares in the Company;

 

  • How to register as a replacement share-holder;

 

  • How to obtain Company information from the other shareholders; and

 

  • The liability of the other shareholders for failing to disclose company informa-tion.

 

  1. Case Study

The information provided in this newsletter shall be based on the following case study.

 

In the underlying scenario, we assume that the father of our client (the “Client”) died several years ago. The deceased set up a Hong Kong Company with a business part-ner (the “Defendant”), and the Defendant is acting as the director of the Company. The name of the Company is “Hong Kong Co. Ltd.” (the “COMPANY”), and the de-ceased is still registered as a shareholder of the Company. The Client, deceased and De-fendant are all German nationals.

 

The Client wants to inherit the shares from the deceased and become a shareholder of

 

 

the Company. However, The Defendant re-fuses to disclose any information about the Company. The Client obtained a judgment from a German court which ordered the Defendant to disclose all relevant informa-tion to the Client. However to date the Cli-ent has not received any information from the Defendant.

 

The abovementioned scenario raises several problems:

 

  • Can the Client inherit shares in the Company?

 

  • If so, how does the Client register as a shareholder?

 

  • What are the Client’s rights to infor-mation and what happens if the direc-tor refuses to provide such infor-mation?

 

  • How can a German judgment be en-forced in Hong Kong?

 

  • In which circumstances will a director (i.e. the Defendant) be liable?; and

 

  • What are the legal consequences to the Defendant if he intentionally harms the Company?

 

III. Legal Solutions

  • Can the Client inherit shares in the Company?

(1). Right to inherit shares from the de-ceased

 

According to the Cap 622 Companies Ordi-nance, Section 153, if the deceased was the holder of the shares then the personal rep-resentative of the deceased can validly trans-fer the shares as if the personal representa-tive had been the registered holder of that share or interest.

 

As part of their duties in distributing the de-ceased’s estate the legal personal representa-tive will identify the relevant beneficiary of the shares (either under a will or the intes-tacy rules). The beneficiary, i.e. the Client, may choose to either register as a share-holder himself or appoint a nominee.

 

Upon registration the Client will have all the same shareholder rights as the deceased. It is therefore essential for the Client to com-plete the registration process as soon as possible. However, the director of the Com-pany i.e. the Defendant retains the right to decline or suspend registration.

 

(2) Right of directors to refuse registration/ transfer of shares

 

According to Cap 622H Companies (Model Articles) Notice (Schedule 1, Section 81, Schedule 2, Section 64) and Section 151 (2) Companies Ordinance, the Defendant has the right to refuse to register a new share-holder or share transfer. Upon such a re-fusal the Defendant must provide a state-ment of reason upon the Client’s request. If no such statement of reason is provided within 28 days of the request, the company commits an offence and is liable to a fine at level 4 (HKD 25,000) and commits a con-tinuing offence which leads to a further fine of HKD 700 for every day in breach of the provision. If the Company still refuses to register the shares, then the Client can apply to the court who will subsequently order the registration to occur (Section 152 Compa-nies Ordinance).

 

  1. If so, how does the Client register as a shareholder?

For the purposes of this section we assume that the Client has been appointed as an ex-

 

 

ecutor under the deceased’s will or is acting as the administrator of the deceased’s estate.

 

(1) File documents with the Inland Revenue Department

 

If the deceased died before the 11th Febru-ary 2006, then the Client must file an appli-cation with the Hong Kong Inland Revenue Department (“IRD”) in order to obtain es-tate duty clearance. If the deceased’s assets are worth less than HK$7.5 million then they will not incur estate duty, but filing the documents with the IRD is still required. The IRD dossier must include:

 

  • Death Certificate;

 

  • Deceased’s identity card/passport/or other legal documents which can prove his identity;

 

  • Applicant’s identity card/passport;

 

  • The Affidavit for the Commissioner (obtained from the IRD);

 

  • Documents related to the assets and li-abilities of the estate (i.e. the Company’s financial statements). If such documents cannot be acquired other equivalent documents can be submitted instead e.g. annual returns. Preferably, the docu-ments should be dated within the 3 years prior to the death of the deceased. The IRD has the power to ask for more documents from the Company if they see fit;

 

  • Documents to prove the relationship between the applicant and the deceased; and

 

  • The original will (if any).

 

Any documents which were issued abroad must be legalized in their country of origin (see below for Authentication of Docu-ments). For example, documents may be sealed by a German Court. Any documents which are not in English or Cantonese must be translated.

 

(2) Apply for a probate grant at the Probate Registrar

 

After receiving the estate duty clearance from the IRD, the Client should apply to the Probate Registry to grant a letter of pro-bate in Hong Kong. He should provide the following documents along with the specific forms:

 

  • Any proof issued by the German Court that the Client is entitled to in-herit the deceased’s assets;

 

  • Death certificate OR a certified copy legalized with the Certificate of Apos-tille in Germany;

 

  • Original Will AND a certified copy thereof;

 

  • Birth certificate of the deceased (origi-nal copy or certified copy), if available;

 

  • Estate duty clearance obtained from the IRD; and

 

  • Applicant’s identity documents.

 

Again, all documents must be legalized in Germany or the applicable foreign country. If all the documents are well prepared, then it will normally take 2 months for the Pro-bate Registrar to process the grant.

(3) Authentication of Documents

 

All the documents mentioned above, which are necessary on the application to the IRD and the Probate Registry, must be legalized in the country of origin. For the purposes of this case study this would be Germany.

 

Since both, Germany and Hong Kong, signed The Hague Convention (Convention of 5 October 1961 Abolishing the Requirement of Le-galisation for Foreign Public Documents), a “legal-

 

 

ized” document is simply one which has a Certificate of Apostille attached. The Certif-icate of Apostille proves that the document is authentic and was issued by the applicable court or administration authority. This cer-tificate is recognized by signatories to the Hague Convention.

 

Therefore, the Client must obtain a Certifi-cate of Apostille for both the deceased’s death certificate and birth certificate. The Certificate of Apostille can be obtained from the following authorities in Germany:

 

  • the Ministries (or Senate Depart-ments) for the Interior;

 

  • Chief Administrative Officer of the district (President of the administra-tive district/district authority);

 

  • Registry Office I (Berlin);

 

  • the Supervisory and Service Direc-torate in Trier (Rhineland-Palatinate); or

 

  • the Land Office of Administration (Thuringia).

 

 

  • Transmission of Shares

 

After the Probate Registrar issues the grant, the estate will be distributed and the Client (as the beneficiary under the will or under the intestacy rules) will be entitled to register the shares. The act of registering shares up-on the death of a shareholder is called a transmission of shares.

 

The Client may choose to be registered as a member (shareholder) of the Company, or may transfer the shares to another person. According to Cap 622 Companies Ordi-nance, Section 161, the Company and its di-rector are bound to accept as sufficient evi-dence of the grant of probate of the will or letters of administration of a deceased person the production of a document that is by law sufficient evidence of that grant.

 

The transmission of shares should be re-ported in the next Annual Return to the Companies Registry. In practice, if the grant of probate is in progress, one may also state in the Annual Return that the original share-holder has died and the grant of probate is in progress.

 

 

  • What are the Client’s rights to infor-mation and what happens if the di-rector refuses to provide such infor-mation?

(1) Criteria to acquire information by court order

 

If the Client has a valid claim which they in-tend to pursue at the Court of First Instance (claim exceeding HK $ 1 Million) then they can apply for pre-action discovery of infor-mation from the potential Defendant under sec 47A District Court Ordinance. The re-quirements for such an application are:

 

  1. The proceeding are very likely to hap-pen;

 

  1. The subsequent claim will be submitted to the Court of First Instance, and will exceed HK$1 million;

 

  1. The documents are directly relevant to the case and they are in possession of the potential Defendant; and

 

  1. The Court thinks it is appropriate to grant such an application.

 

(2) Conclusion

 

Please note that until the Probate Registrar issues the grant of probate the Client will not be regarded as having officially inherited the shares and will consequently have no claim against the Defendant.


 

  • How can a German judgment be en-forced in Hong Kong?

(1) Time limitation

 

According to Foreign Judgments (Reciprocal En-forcement) Ordinance [Cap 319, section 4 (1)], a Hong Kong court will not recognize or exe-cute any foreign judgments if more than 6 years have elapsed since the date of judg-ment.

 

(2) Requirements of the German judgment:

 

According to Conflict of Law in Hong Kong (Graeme Johnson), there are 6 requirements to enforce a German (or any other foreign) judgment in Hong Kong:

 

  • The German judgment must not be against natural justice. That is, in obtain-ing the German judgment, the Defen-dant must have had an opportunity to present his case before the court. Fur-ther, the judgment must not have been obtained by fraud;

 

  • The Defendant must have been pre-sented/residing in German at the time of the original proceedings commenced (to prevent forum shopping). If the De-fendant is a company then Germany should be its fixed place of business or the location from where the business of the Company is managed;

 

  1. The German judgment must be final, meaning that there must not be any pending proceedings in Germany;

 

  • The case must not be tried in Hong Kong or other countries by the same parties;

 

  • The German judgment must not con-flict with any Hong Kong case law; and

 

  1. The German judgment must not be contrary to Hong Kong’s public policy (“Ordre Public”).

 

(3) Conclusion

 

Assuming that the Defendant was a resident of Germany at the beginning of the original proceedings and the German judgment meets all the above mentioned criteria it is likely that a Hong Kong court will recognize and enforce the German judgment.

 

 

  • In what circumstances will a director (i.e. the Defendant) be liable?

(1) Director fails to conduct the annual gen-eral meeting

 

According to the Cap 622 Companies Ordi-nance, Section 610 (9), a shareholder may report the director’s failure to conduct the annual general meeting to the court. The court may then order the director to sched-ule the meeting. If the director still fails to conduct the meeting, the court may order the director to pay a fine.

 

(2) Director fails to convene extraordinary general meetings

 

According to the Cap 622 Companies Ordi-nance, Section 566 (1), (2), a company must convene an extraordinary general meeting upon request of any shareholder who hold more than 5% of the company’s paid up capital. If the director fails to do so then they must repay and reimburse the company for any reasonable expenses which result from the failure to conduct the meeting. Reasonable expenses include, for example, the fees of facilities or remuneration of ser-vices which has been wasted as the result of failing to conduct the meeting.

 

 

  1. What are the legal consequences to the Defendant if he intentionally harms the Company?

(1) Disqualification of the directors

A director may be disqualified under a court order if:

 

  • The director is convicted of a criminal offence in connection with their com-pany in regards to which he has acted fraudulently or dishonestly Cap 32 Companies (Winding Up and Miscella-neous Provisions) Ordinance, Section 168E (1);

 

  • The director is in persistent default of the Companies Ordinance. That is, the director fails to return, file, or deliver any documents required by the Compa-nies Ordinance more than 3 times in 5 years (Cap 32 Companies (Winding Up and Miscellaneous Provisions) Ordi-nance, Section 168F (2), (3)).

 

A court order to disqualify a director may be requested by (a) the Companies Registry, or

 

(b) any past or present member of the com-pany (Cap 32 Companies (Winding Up and Miscellaneous Provisions) Ordinance, Sec-tion 168P).

 

In the case of Re GP Nanotechnology Group

[2009] HKEC 1677, two directors were dis-qualified by the court, and banned from act-ing as a director of any other corporation for 6 years. The directors were disqualified because they were responsible for the exe-cution of 5 extraordinary transactions which continuously drained funds out of the com-pany without any proper purpose. The transactions were plainly not in the com-pany’s interest.

 

(2) Obtain compensation from the directors

 

A director has a fiduciary duty to act for the benefit of the company and to exercise his powers for proper purposes. Assuming that the director (i.e. the Defendant) had intentionally withdrawn money from the COMPANY, or had caused financial harm to the COMPANY or any shareholder (i.e. the Client) then the injured party may claim for any financial damage or loss which was caused by the di-rector’s (Defendant’s) acts.

 

In addition, if the Defendant used the COMPANY to make a personal profit with-out paying any fees or accounting for the transaction to the COMPANY, then the Client may make a claim for the said wrongfully gained profit.

 

 

In the case Industrial Development Consultants v Cooley (1972) 1 WLR 433, the defendant ob-tained information and knowledge about an industrial project through his position as a director of Industrial Development Consult-ants. The director then resigned from his position and used the information to make a large amount of personal profit. Industrial Development Consultants the sued the former director and successfully claimed the personal profit.

 

 

 

 

 

Organisation and Duties of Board of

Directors and Company Secretaries

 

in Hong Kong

 

 

June 2014

 

 

All rights reserved © LORENZ & PARTNERS 2014

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information provided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, including any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

  1. Introduction

The owners of a Hong Kong company are its shareholders. However, the shareholders usually do not participate in the actual day to day business of the company. Instead the normal day to day business and decision making is conducted by Directors. These Directors may be, but are not required to be, employees of the Company.

 

Another important officer of every company is the “Company Secretary”. A Company Secretary should not be confused with a normal secretary or administrative assistants. The position of the Company Secretary is required by Hong Kong Law and is subject to numerous requirements and obligations.

 

The following newsletter has been drafted to provide a brief overview of Board of Direc-tors (“BoD”) and the duties and appoint-ment of Company Secretaries.

 

 

  1. Decision Making by the Board of Directors
  2. Decision making

Directors’ decisions are made via passing resolutions within properly convened BoD meetings. There is no set number of BoD meetings which must be held per year. In-stead the Directors may meet to dispatch business and regulate the meetings as they think fit (Cap 622H Companies (Model Ar-ticles) Notice, Schedule 1, Section 7 (1), Schedule 2, Section 9 (1)). Decisions are normally made by simple majority of the at-tending Directors. If there is no majority then the Chairman has a casting vote (Cap

 

 

622H Companies (Model Articles) Notice, Schedule 1, Section 14 (1), Schedule 2, Sec-tion 13 (1)).

 

Alternatively the Model Articles (Cap 622H Companies (Model Articles) Notice, Sched-ule 1, Section 17, Schedule 2, Section 8 (2)) provide, that a resolution can be passed by circulating a written draft between the Di-rectors. If this draft is approved and signed by all Directors then it will be as valid and effectual as if it had been passed at a duly convened BoD meeting.

 

Under the standard provisions set out in the law Directors can only exercise their powers collectively via these meeting or written resolutions; they have no power to act indi-vidually as agents of the company. If a Di-rector violates this rule, he might be in breach of his duties to the company. Further the act will be internally (within the com-pany) invalid unless and until ratified by a general shareholders’ meeting. However, the act is still valid in regards to and enforceable by third parties, so long as the said third par-ty was unaware of the Director’s breach.

 

However, most companies enable the BoD to delegate its powers to individual Direc-tors, Director Committees, or to a Managing Director, so that a BoD resolution is not re-quired for each and every decision which must be made in order for the company to run smoothly.

 

  1. Resolution and Minutes

Decisions of the BoD are recorded in both a Resolution and in the Minutes of Meeting. A Resolution must be signed by all the Direc-tors, regardless of whether the decision was made in a meeting or in writing. However,

 

 

Minutes of Meeting only needs to be signed by the Chairman although the other Direc-tors can choose to sign as well if they wish (Section 482 (2) Companies Ordinance).

 

Minutes must be drafted for every BoD meeting. The completed Minutes must be kept in the company book (Section 481 (1) and Section 621 Companies Ordinance). Unless the contrary is proven, every meeting which has duly executed Minutes will be as-sumed to have been correctly called and held.

 

 

III. Change of Board of Directors

  1. Resignation

A Director can resign from the BoD at any time (Section 464 Companies Ordinance). Either the company or the Director himself must notify the Companies Registry of the resignation (Section 464 (2), (3) Companies Ordinance). Directors who are also em-ployees should consider whether such a res-ignation will breach their service contract with the company. If there is such a breach then the Director may be held liable for any resulting damage to the company.

 

  1. Removal

A Director may be removed by passing an ordinary shareholder resolution (Section 462

(1) Companies Ordinance). However, if the Director is also an employee then the share-holders should consider whether such a re-moval would breach their service contract. The company must notify the Companies Registry of the removal.

 

  1. Appointment

In contrast to the removal of a Director, a Director can be appointed by a BoD Deci-sion (Cap 622H Companies (Model Articles) Notice, Schedule 1, Section 23 (1) (b),

 

Schedule 2, Section 22 (1) (b)). The Director must then be confirmed by the shareholders at the next Annual General Meeting.

 

 

  1. Appointment and Resignation

of a Company Secretary

 

  1. Company Secretary

According to Section 474 (1) Companies Ordinance every Hong Kong Company must have a Company Secretary, who is an officer of the company. The Company Secretary can be a Director of the same company, so long as the company has more than one Director. If the Company Secretary is an individual, he must ordinarily reside in Hong Kong. If the Company Secretary is a company, its registered office must be in Hong Kong (Section 474 (4) (b) Companies Ordinance).

 

The Company Secretary is the chief admin-istration officer of the company with ex-tensive duties and liabilities.

 

  1. Power and Duties

A Company Secretary’s general duties in-clude corresponding with the shareholders and regulatory bodies and ensuring that the company complies with the regulations re-garding the organisation of the Director and shareholder meetings. Therefore the Com-pany Secretary must be present at all such meetings and is entrusted to make proper meeting Minutes. The Company Secretary will usually countersign every document to which the seal of the company is affixed. Further the Company Secretary will oversee share transfers, keep the books of the com-pany and deliver documents and necessary returns to the Hong Kong Companies Reg-istry.

 

 

  1. Appointment and Resignation

The Company Secretary is appointed by the Directors. The Directors will decide the Company Secretary’s term or office, remu-neration and appointment conditions (Cap 622H Companies (Model Articles) Notice, Schedule 1, Section 37 (1), Schedule 2, Sec-tion 3 (1) (b)).

 

The rules regarding the resignation of a Company Secretary are the same as those for Directors. A Company Secretary may be re-moved from office by a normal BoD resolu-tion.

 

 

 

 

Rücktritt eines Direktors bei einer

 

Hong Kong Gesellschaft

 

 

 

Juni 2014

 

Obwohl Lorenz & Partners große Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in diesen Newslettern bereitgestellten

Informationen auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass diese eine individuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen können. Lorenz & Partners übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität, Korrektheit oder Vollständigkeit der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Partners, welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nutzung oder Nichtnutzung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informationen verursacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorliegt.

 

 

  1. Fragestellung

Wie kann in einer Hongkong Gesellschaft ein Direktor von seinem Posten/ seiner Funktion als Direktor zurücktreten oder enthoben werden, wenn er entweder:

 

  • direkt in einem Board Meeting den Rücktritt erklärt, bzw. er seinen Rücktritt schriftlich erklärt, oder

 

  • er nicht freiwillig zurücktreten will, bzw. die anderen Direktoren oder Gesellschafter ihn schnellstmöglich abberufen wollen.

 

  • Beurteilung
  • Der Direktor tritt freiwillig bzw. aus eigenem Willen zurück.

 

Der Direktor einer Hongkong Gesellschaft kann grundsätzlich jederzeit durch Erklärung gegenüber der Gesellschaft von seinem Posten zurücktreten. Hierfür ist nach Section 464 (1) der Hong Kong Companies Ordinance ausreichend, dass er der Gesellschaft gegenüber erklärt, dass er seinen Posten aufgibt.

 

Diese Erklärung kann entweder schriftlich gegenüber der Gesellschaft erfolgen (durch einen sog. „Resignation letter“). Der Direk-tor kann diese Erklärung auch gegenüber den anderen Board Mitgliedern in einem Board Meeting mündlich abgeben.

 

Beide Möglichkeiten entfalten die gleiche Rechtswirkung. Hierbei kann der Direktor erklären, dass sein Austritt mit sofortiger Wirkung erfolge, oder er kann seinen Austritt mit

 

 

Wirkung zu einem späteren Zeitpunkt erklä-ren. Zu beachten ist aber,

 

 

dass diese Erklärung nicht zurück ge-nommen werden kann.

 

Mit dieser Erklärung gegenüber der Gesell-schaft bzw. den anderen Direktoren ist der Direktor grundsätzlich im Innenverhältnis von seinem Amt frei geworden. Allerdings sind in diesem Zusammenhang die Umstände des Einzelfalles zu beachten, da sowohl in den Articles of Association als auch in einer vertraglichen Vereinbarung ge-regelt werden kann, dass ein Rücktritt nicht vor Ablauf einer bestimmten Zeit erfolgen kann. Dann kann der Director zwar aufgrund der Vertragsfreiheit trotzdem zurück treten, macht sich dann aber eventuell Schadensersatzpflichtig.

 

Die Gesellschaft hat im Falle eines wirksa-men Rücktritts das Formular D2A an das „Companies Registry“ (Handelsregister) zu übermitteln, in dem erklärt wird, dass der Direktor ausgeschieden ist. Übersendet die Gesellschaft das Dokument nicht, oder hat der zurücktretende Director berechtigte Zweifel daran, dass die Gesellschaft dies tun wird, so kann er selbst tätig werden und seinen Rücktritt von seinem Posten dem Companies Registry gegenüber durch das Formular D4 (samt seinem Resignation Letter) selbst erklären.

 

Nach Abgabe des Formulars D2A, bzw. D4 und der Eintragung der Änderung beim Handelsregister ist der Direktor auch im Außenverhältnis ausgeschieden.

 

  • Wie lange dauert es bis der Direktor tatsächlich ausgeschieden ist?

 

Mit Abgabe der Erklärung (Resignation Let-ter), bzw. nach Ablauf der darin angezeigten Frist, ist der Direktor im Innenverhältnis ausgeschieden. Im Außenverhältnis bleibt er solange im Amt, bis das Formular D2A, bzw. D4 an das „Companies Registry“ übermittelt ist und der Austritt beim Handelsregister eingetragen sind.

 

  • Welche Dokumente werden benö-tigt?

 

Von Seiten des austretenden Direktors ist die Austrittserklärung (Resignation Letter) ausreichend, daneben werden für das Companies Registry noch die oben genannten Formulare D2A bzw. D4 benötigt.

 

  • Der Direktor soll gegen seinen Wil-len aus seinem Amt entfernt werden

 

Ein Direktor kann gemäß Section 462 (1) der Companies Ordinance auch gegen seinen Willen vor Ablauf seines Vertrages von seinem Amt abberufen werden. Diese gesetzliche Regel ist nicht abdingbar. Hierzu

 

 

bedarf es eines Beschlusses entweder der Gesellschafter oder der übrigen Direktoren. Formell ist zu beachten, dass der Direktor vor Beschlussfassung hierüber informiert wird und ihm auf der Versammlung, auf der

 

der Beschluss über sein Ausscheiden gefasst wird, die Möglichkeit zur Stellungnahme ge-geben wird. Wird ihm diese Möglichkeit nicht eingeräumt, so können eventuell Schadensersatzansprüche gegen die Ge-sellschaft entstehen. Zusätzlich muss dem Director die Möglichkeit gegeben werden bereits im Vorfeld schriftlich Stellung in angemessener Länge zu nehmen. Diese Stellungnahme muss in der Regel (soweit sie nicht zu spät erfolgt) an diejenigen, die auch die Einladung zum Meeting erhalten haben gesendet werden.

 

Mit der Beschlussfassung scheidet der Direktor im Innenverhältnis aus, im Außenverhältnis scheidet er mit Abgabe des Formulars D2A und Eintragung im Companies Registry aus.

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 180    (DE)

 

 

 

 

 

Das Board of Directors einer Gesellschaft in Hongkong

 

 

Funktion und Haftung

 

 

 

Januar 2015

 

Obwohl Lorenz & Partners große Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in diesen Newslettern bereitgestellten In-formationen auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass diese eine individuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen können. Lorenz & Partners übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität, Korrektheit oder Vollständigkeit der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche ge-gen Lorenz & Partners, welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nut-zung oder Nichtnutzung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvoll-ständiger Informationen verursacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorliegt.

 

 

  1. Einleitung

 

Dieser Newsletter soll in einem Überblick die Funktionen, Rechte und Pflichten sowie die Haftung des Board of Directors („BoD“) einer Limited Company in Hong-kong erläutern. Hierzu wird nur auf Private Companies eingegangen. Die teilweise strengeren und komplexeren Regelungen für Public Companies und insbesondere Listed Companies (börsengehandelt) werden ledig-lich in Fußnoten erwähnt.

 

  1. Struktur einer Limited Company

 

Um das BoD richtig einordnen zu können, muss man zuerst den Aufbau einer Limited Company in Hongkong betrachten.

 

Eine Hongkonger Gesellschaft besteht im We-sentlichen aus drei Organen:

 

  • den Shareholdern bzw. Eigentümern (in Hongkong auch Members genannt (Section 112 der neuen Companies Ordinance – CO),

 

  • dem Board of Directors bestehend aus den Direktoren der Gesellschaft (Sections 453ff.), und

 

  • dem Company Secretary.

 

Grundsätzlich kann jede natürliche und/oder juristische Person Shareholder und/oder Direktor sowie Company Secreta-ry sein. Nach der neuen CO – Cap 622, Section 457 (2) muss jede Limited Company zumindest eine natürliche Person als Direk-tor haben. Das Kapital, das die Shareholder grundsätzlich einzuzahlen haben, muss zu keinem Zeitpunkt wirklich einbezahlt wer-den, es sei denn, das BoD fordert dies von den Shareholdern. Es gibt auch keine

 

Pflicht, nicht einbezahltes Kapital zu verzin-sen.

 

Bei dem Kapital ist zu unterscheiden zwi-schen den Folgenden:

 

Registered Capital: das Kapital, das im Ge-sellschaftsvertrag (Articles of Association, ”AoA“) vorgeschlagen und bei den Behörden registriert ist.

 

Authorised Capital: das Kapital, das von den Shareholdern dem BoD genehmigt wurde.

 

Issued Capital: die Kapitalsumme äquiva-lent zu dem Wert der Anteile, die die Gesell-schaft tatsächlich ausgegeben hat (ist immer gleich oder weniger als das Authorised Capi-tal).

 

Paid up (or paid in) Capital: Dieses Kapi-tal haben die Shareholder/Eigentümer der Gesellschaft bereits eingezahlt und zur Ver-fügung gestellt.

 

Outstanding  Capital  (uncalled  capital):

 

Das Kapital, das als Gesellschaftskapital au-torisiert, aber noch nicht von den Gesell-schaftern einbezahlt worden ist.

 

Eigenkapital: Das Eigenkapital bezeichnet das gesamte tatsächliche von den Sharehol-dern einbezahlte Kapital, vermehrt oder ver-ringert durch angehäufte Gewinne oder Ver-luste. Das Eigenkapital ist das verbleibende Kapital der Gesellschaft, dass den Sharehol-dern gehört. Der Wert des Eigenkapitals be-rechnet sich aus dem aktuellen Marktwert der Aktiva (Cash-Kapital plus Sachanlagen) der Gesellschaft wovon die Summe aller Be-lastungen abgezogen wird.

 

 

Fremdkapital: das Kapital, das von dritten Personen (z.B. Banken oder anderen, auch Gesellschafterdarlehen) der Gesellschaft zur Verfügung gestellt wird und zurückgezahlt werden muss.

 

III. Funktion des BoD

 

Um ein grundlegendes Verständnis für das BoD zu bekommen, wird zunächst auf des-sen allgemeinen Aufgaben, auf dessen Be-setzung sowie auf die Rechte und Pflichten eines Direktors eingegangen.

 

  1. Generelle Aufgaben des BoD

 

Das BoD ist das ausführende Organ der Ge-sellschaft (Governing Body) und gibt die Richtung der Gesellschaft vor. Hierbei han-delt es im besten Interesse der Gesellschaft (nicht unbedingt der Gesellschafter). Außer-dem bestimmt und beaufsichtigt das BoD die Manager der Gesellschaft, welche die Entscheidungen des BoD umsetzen müssen.

 

Die Aufgaben des BoD umfassen unter an-derem:

 

  • Entscheidungsvorbereitung für das An-nual General Meeting („AGM“) der Shareholder;

 

  • Langfristige strategische Planung, Ziel-festlegung;

 

  • Ernennung des Managements, Festle-gung der Managementstruktur;

 

  • Beaufsichtigung des Managements, Kor-rekturmaßnahmen, falls Planung und Ziele nicht ausreichend beachtet werden;

 

  • Berichterstattung gegenüber den Anteils-eignern über Aktivitäten der Gesell-schaft.

 

Die Fassung eines Beschlusses (Board Reso-lution) geschieht durch eine Entscheidung mit einfacher Mehrheit, wenn nicht im Ge-setz eine qualifizierte Mehrheit (75%) gefor-dert ist.

 

Einige Aufgaben können an Ausschüsse oder das Management delegiert werden. Dies

 

 

setzt allerdings voraus, dass die Gesellschaft groß genug ist, um derartige Gremien zu in-stallieren. Die Verantwortung verbleibt je-doch stets beim Board als Gesamtgremium.

 

  1. Mitglieder des BoD

 

Nach Section 2 wird jede Person, welche die Position eines Direktors einnimmt und ent-sprechende Aufgaben wahrnimmt, (unab-hängig von ihrer Bezeichnung) als Direktor qualifiziert. Dies kann dazu führen, dass auch Personen, welche nicht formell als Di-rektoren berufen wurden (unabhängig da-von, dass das Nichtbefolgen der Formalien ein Vergehen darstellt) als Direktoren be-handelt werden.

 

Wird eine Person, die keinen Sitz im Board einer Gesellschaft inne hat von der Gesell-schaft nach außen hin als Direktor bezeich-net, wird die Gesellschaft durch Vertragsab-schlüsse der Person gebunden, als hätte die Person die Vertretungsmacht eines Direk-tors. Diese sogenannte „Turquand Rule“ 1 dient dem Schutz gutgläubiger Dritter.

 

Befolgt das Board laufend Anweisungen ei-ner Person, welche kein ernannter Direktor ist, handelt es sich um einen sogenannten

 

„Shadow Director“, welcher dann wie ein ordnungemäß bestellter Direktor behandelt wird.

 

Alle Direktoren tragen in gleichem Maße Verantwortung. Jedoch bestehen, je nach Satzung (Articles of Association, AoA), ver-schiedene Positionen, die ein Direktor in-nerhalb des Board of Directors (BoD) inne-haben kann.

 

Ab einer gewissen Größe der Gesellschaft wird zur Erleichterung der Arbeit des Boards ein Vorsitzender (Chairman) vom Board bestimmt, der diesem vorsteht, seine Sitzungen leitet und es nach außen hin re-präsentiert. Weiter kann vom Board ein Ma-naging Director bestimmt werden, welcher als Spitze des Managements über die Um-

1 Royal British Bank vs. Turquand (1856)

 

 

setzung der Unternehmensstrategie wacht. Zur Wahrnehmung dieser Aufgaben erhal-ten Chairman und Managing Director vom BoD weitergehende Rechte, welche der Er-füllung ihrer Verpflichtungen dienen und hierzu nötig sind. Es ist auch möglich, dass beide Positionen von derselben Person ein-genommen werden. Ob dies sinnvoll ist hängt von der jeweiligen Gesellschaft ab.

 

Auch ist es wichtig, in einem Beschluss des Boards zu regeln, wer für welche Konten kontoführungsberechtigt ist und folglich

 

„Bank Signing Authority“ besitzt.

 

Zur Vereinfachung der Arbeitsvorgänge be-steht auch die Möglichkeit, Boardmitgliedern oder Dritten mittels einer Board Resolution Vollmachten zu erteilen.

 

Hierbei gilt es jedoch zu beachten, dass eine Vollmacht folgende Punkte umfasst:

 

  • Beginn und Ende der Vollmacht,
  • Ausmaß der Bevollmächtigung,

 

  • Möglichkeit, Untervollmachten zu erteilen,

 

  • Widerrufbarkeit der Vollmacht (am si-chersten ist hier eine jederzeitige Wider-rufsmöglichkeit durch jedes einzelne Mitglied des Boards).

 

 

  1. Rechte und Pflichten eines Direktors

 

  • Private Companies

Private Companies sind solche, in denen die Anteilseigner nur beschränkte Rechte zur Übertragung ihrer Anteile haben, die Anzahl der Anteilseigner auf 50 begrenzt und ein Angebot an die Öffentlichkeit, Anteile zu zeichnen, untersagt ist (Section 11 CO).

 

  • Rechte eines Direktors

Die Gesellschaft selbst erhält ihre Rechte und Pflichten durch Gesetz und den Gesell-schaftsvertrag (Articles of Association). Die-se Rechte werden an das BoD delegiert. Die Rechte und Pflichten eines Direktors werden

 

 

also in der Satzung der Gesellschaft festge-legt. Diese umfasst alle Rechte, die zur Wahrnehmung der Aufgaben des BoD not-wendig sind.

 

Üblicherweise haben Direktoren das Recht, Sitzungen (Board Meetings) einzuberufen und über Sitzungen vorgängig benachrichtigt zu werden. Beschlüsse, die in Sitzungen ge-troffen wurden, über die nicht alle Mitglie-der des Boards ordnungsgemäß benachrich-tigt wurden, sind nichtig. Für die Beschluss-fähigkeit einer Sitzung muss ein durch die Satzung bestimmtes Quorum erfüllt sein.

 

Es besteht auch die Möglichkeit sogenannte

„Paper Meetings“ abzuhalten (z.B. per Post oder Email), bei denen die Anwesenheit der Direktoren nicht erforderlich ist, sondern die Entscheidung quasi im Umlagebeschluss gefasst wird. Die neue CO, Cap 622 H Companies (Model Articles) Notice Schedu-le2, Section 10 (2), enthält des Weiteren die Möglichkeit ein Meeting auf elektronischem Wege (also per Telefon- oder Videokonfe-renz) abzuhalten.

 

Nach Regelung der S.119 und S.119a ist die Sitzung zu protokollieren und die Protokolle (Minutes of Meeting) sind im „Registered Office“ aufzubewahren. Das Nichtbefolgen dieser Vorschriften wird mit Bußgeld geahn-det. Für Entscheidungen des Boards tragen die Direktoren die gemeinsame Verantwor-tung. Wurde eine Entscheidung durch das Board gefällt, ist jeder Direktor verpflichtet sie mitzutragen.

 

Hält einer der Direktoren eine Entscheidung jedoch für wirtschaftlich nicht sinnvoll, soll-te dies auf einer Sitzung des Boards bespro-chen und protokolliert werden. Je nach Sat-zung hat der Direktor die Möglichkeit eine eigene Sitzung hierfür einzuberufen. Falls nicht, besteht die Möglichkeit, durch die Un-terstützung der Anteilseigner (Shareholder) ein Extraordinary General Meeting („EGM“ ) einzuberufen, um das Problem klären zu lassen.

 

 

Hält ein Direktor eine Entscheidung des Boards nicht nur für wirtschaftlich unklug, sondern für rechtswidrig, ist er gegenüber der Gesellschaft verpflichtet, dagegen vor-zugehen. Hier besteht die Möglichkeit, in-terne wie externe Hilfe zu suchen. Etwa bei Wirtschaftsprüfern der Gesellschaft, bei den Anteilseignern oder dem Financial Secre-tary2.

 

Wird allerdings eine Entscheidung vom Board getroffen, so sind alle Mitglieder hier-für verantwortlich, egal, ob sie dafür oder dagegen gestimmt haben. Die einzige Mög-lichkeit eines Direktors, dieser Verant-wortung zu entgehen, ist der sofortige Aus-tritt (vor Abstimmung) aus dem Gremium, was die Kündigung seiner Direktorenstel-lung bedeutet. Dies kann formlos (auch mündlich) den anderen Direktoren gegen-über erklärt werden und ist sofort wirksam und nicht widerrufbar.

 

Die Direktoren haben ein Informationsrecht bezüglich aller Informationen, die zur Erfül-lung ihrer Aufgaben notwendig sind. Bei-spielsweise können sie Einsicht in die Ge-schäftsbücher und Einkunftsstatistiken nehmen, um Informationen zur Manage-mentbeaufsichtigung zu erhalten. Auch ha-ben sie Zugang zu Projektplänen und Bud-gets, um die Ziele der Gesellschaft festlegen zu können.

 

Zur Ausgabe von Anteilen ist ein Direktor allerdings erst nach Genehmigung der Aus-gabe in einem General Meetings befugt.

 

  • Pflichten eines Direktors

 

Die Direktoren üben ihre Rechte treuhän-disch für die Gesellschaft (nicht primär für die Shareholder) aus. Hieraus ergeben sich für einen Direktor einige Pflichten.

 

 

 

 

2 Bei Public Companies kommen auch Organisatio-nen, wie die HKEx, dem Securities Commissioner oder dem Panel on Takeover & Mergers in Betracht.

 

 

Grundlegende Pflichten

 

  • Er muss in Treu und Glauben (Bona Fide) zum Wohle der Gesellschaft han-deln. Hierbei besteht die Schwierigkeit zu bestimmen, was im Interesse der Ge-sellschaft liegt. Etwa wenn lang- und kurzfristige Interessen abgewogen wer-den müssen. Auch besteht teilweise ein Spannungsverhältnis zwischen den Inte-ressen der Mutter- und Tochtergesell-schaft. Hier ist der Direktor jedoch pri-mär der Gesellschaft gegenüber ver-pflichtet, in deren er Board tätig ist und erst in zweiter Linie gegenüber der Mut-tergesellschaft.

 

  • Er muss seine Befugnisse für die richti-gen, gesellschaftsdienlichen Zwecke nut-zen. Die Befugnisse, welche der Direktor durch die Satzung erhält, dürfen nicht zu anderen Zwecken verwendet werden, als von der Satzung vorgesehen sind.

 

  • Er darf keinen Konflikt zwischen seinen Pflichten als Direktor und seinen per-sönlichen Interessen zulassen. Treten solche auf, muss der Direktor diese so-fort klären (Section 536 (1) CO). Ein Di-rektor darf keine persönlichen Vorteile aus den Möglichkeiten der Gesellschaft ziehen. Die Gerichte legen einen hohen Maßstab an im Bezug darauf, was von Treuhändern verlangt wird. Geheime Gewinne (Secret Profits), welche ein Di-rektor im Zuge seiner Tätigkeit als Di-rektor erwirbt und die gegenüber der Gesellschaft nicht offengelegt wurden, stehen der Gesellschaft zu.

 

Die treuhänderische Stellung eines Direktors kann es nötig machen, dass im Falle eines vorliegenden oder möglichen Interessenkon-flikts der Direktor seine Interessen offenlegt (Declaration of Interest). Gestützt wird dies durch S.536 ff., wonach die Direktoren bei jedem für die Geschäfte der Gesellschaft bedeutsamen Vertrag ihre Interessen of-fenlegen müssen.

 

Anfällig für Interessenkonflikte sind insbe-sondere Verträge zwischen einem Direktor

 

 

und der Gesellschaft. Die Companies Ordinance beinhaltet komplexe Regeln, wel-che Darlehen und vergleichbare Geschäfte der Gesellschaft mit Direktoren oder mit ih-nen verbundenen Personen untersagen.

 

Grundsätzlich gilt, dass die Gesellschaft ei-nem Direktor oder einer Gesellschaft, wel-che von einem solchen kontrolliert wird, kein Darlehen oder Sicherheiten für ein Dar-lehen geben darf.

 

Es ist einer Private Company jedoch mög-lich, mit Zustimmung des General Meetings, Direktoren Darlehen zu gewähren. Auch Gesellschaften, zu deren Tagesgeschäft die Vergabe von Darlehen und Ähnlichem ge-hört, ist es möglich im Rahmen des norma-len Geschäftsbetriebes Darlehen an Direkto-ren zu vergeben. Diese Ausnahmen sind je-doch nur möglich, wenn die gesamten Haf-tungsverpflichtungen der Gesellschaft 5% ihres Nettovermögens nicht übersteigt.

 

Nach Section 500 ff müssen solche und ei-nige andere Darlehen dem General Meeting vorgelegt werden.

 

Maßstab der Sorgfaltspflicht

 

Das Maß der Sorgfalt, mit der ein Direktor seine Verpflichtungen und Aufgaben erfül-len muss, war Gegenstand des Falles RE City Equitable Fire Insurance Co Ltd (1925). Das Gericht nannte drei Punkte, welche die Sorgfaltspflicht eines Direktors zusammen-fassen.

 

  1. Ein Direktor muss ein solches Maß an Sorgfalt und Fähigkeit ausüben, welches von einem vernünftigen, gewöhnlichen Menschen in seinen eigenen Angelegen-heiten in dieser besonderen Situation er-wartet würde. Er muss nicht über das ge-wöhnliche Maß hinausgehen, welches vernünftigerweise von einer Person sei-nes Wissens und seiner Erfahrung er-wartet werden kann.

 

  1. Ein Direktor sollte, wenn es ihm mög-lich ist, die Board Meetings besuchen. Durch die unregelmäßige Natur seiner

 

 

Aufgaben ist er jedoch nicht verpflichtet, sich ununterbrochen den Angelegenhei-ten der Gesellschaft zu widmen.

 

  • Im Bezug auf Pflichten, die an andere Stellen delegiert wurden, ist ein Direktor berechtigt, darauf zu vertrauen, dass die-se Stellen die übertragenen Aufgaben pflichtgemäß ausführen, es sei denn, es würden Verdachtsgründe vorliegen.

 

In der Entscheidung Secretary of State for Trade vs. Baker(No 6) (1999) wurden drei weitere Punkte ausgearbeitet.

 

  1. Die Direktoren sind individuell und kol-lektiv dazu verpflichtet, sich fortlaufend ausreichendes Wissen über die Ge-schäfte der Gesellschaft anzueignen und zu erhalten, um ihre Pflichten erfüllen zu können.

 

  1. Die Möglichkeit Aufgaben nach unten zu delegieren entbindet Direktoren nicht von der Verpflichtung, die Ausführung der delegierten Aufgaben zu überwa-chen.

 

  1. Für diese Verpflichtung lässt sich keine allgemeingültige Regel finden, es kommt auf die Umstände des Einzelfalls an und darauf, welche Rolle der Direktor im Management spielt.

 

In der neuen Companies Ordinance (Section 465) ist zum ersten Mal ein Standard der einzuhaltenden objektiven und subjektiven Sorgfalt festgelegt.

 

Directors Report

Die Direktoren sind verpflichtet am Ende des Rechnungsjahres einen Bericht über den Gewinn oder Verlust der Gesellschaft wäh-rend des Rechnungsjahres und den Stand der Geschäfte der Gesellschaft zu verfassen. Dieser Bericht wird der Bilanz, welche der Gesellschaft auf einem General Meeting vorgelegt wird, hinzugefügt. Auch wird er al-len hierzu Berechtigten 21 Tage vor einem Meeting zugesandt. Zuvor muss der Bericht durch das Board genehmigt und unterzeich-net werden. Alle formellen oder materiellen Mängel in Bezug auf diese Berichterstattung, sei es bei Unterzeichnung oder bei der Er-füllung der Vorgaben der Section 383, haben rechtliche Konsequenzen (Section 391 (3), (4)).

 

  1. Haftung des BoD

 

Nach Section 468 CO ist es grundsätzlich möglich im Gesellschaftsvertrag so festzule-gen, dass die Haftung der Direktoren unbe-schränkt ist. Ein Direktor haftet dann ge-genüber der Gesellschaft oder Dritten im Bezug auf Schadensersatz unbegrenzt (Unlimited Liability). Lediglich die Haftung der Anteilseigner ist bei einer Limited Com-pany beschränkt.

 

Die AoA sowie die CO machen es möglich, dass ein Direktor gegenüber einer anderen Person als der Gesellschaft haftbar gemacht wird in Verbindung mit Nachlässigkeit, Fahrlässigkeit, Pflichtverletzung oder Ver-trauensverlust gegenüber dem Unternehmen (Cap 622H Companies (Model Articles) Notice, Schedule 2, Section 31 (1) und Section 469 CO), wobei gewisse Zahlungen, wie Entschädigungen für Strafen, nicht da-runter fallen. Eine weitergehende Absiche-rung ist durch „Directors & Officers“ – Ver-sicherungsschutz („D&O) möglich.

 

Weiterhin sieht die Companies Ordinance eine Reihe von Sanktionen für den Fall vor, dass die Direktoren gegen diese Vorschriften verstoßen. Die Sanktionen umfassen auch „Shadow Directors“, die in Section 2 defi-niert sind.

 

  1. Innenhaftung

 

Aus China Everbright-IHD Pacific Ltd vs Ch’ng Poh (2003) ergibt sich, dass im Innenverhält-nis zur Gesellschaft ein Direktor für Schä-den haftet, welche aus Verletzung seiner Pflichten gegenüber der Gesellschaft resul-tieren. Bei einer Pflichtverletzung durch mehrere Direktoren haften diese sowohl ge-meinsam als auch einzeln.

 

 

  1. Außenhaftung

 

Für Schulden und Verpflichtungen nach Au-ßen hin haftet grundsätzlich nur die Gesell-schaft als eigenständige Rechtspersönlich-keit. Ein Direktor haftet somit nicht persön-lich gegenüber Gläubigern der Gesellschaft, solange klar ist, dass er im Namen der Ge-sellschaft gehandelt hat.

 

Hiervon gibt es einige Ausnahmen. Wenn etwa eine Gesellschaft den Status einer ru-henden Gesellschaft hat (Dormant Compa-ny, definiert in der Section 5 CO) und trotz-dem laufend Geschäfte tätigt, von denen die Direktoren wissen oder wissen müssten, haf-ten sie nach S. 448 persönlich für die Ver-pflichtungen oder Schulden der Gesell-schaft.

 

Bei strafrechtlich relevanten Verstößen der Gesellschaft kann sich aber auch ein einzel-ner Direktor, der hierfür die Verantwortung trägt, strafbar machen.

 

Auch kann es zu sogenannter „Collateral Liability“ kommen, wenn z.B. die Direkto-ren einen Unternehmenskredit der Gesell-schaft persönlich sichern.

 

Für Schäden welche Dritten durch Pflicht-verletzungen eines Direktors entstehen, haf-tet dieser ebenfalls persönlich.

 

  1. Versicherungsschutz

 

Ein Direktor kann sich von verschiedenen Seiten dem Vorwurf der Pflichtverletzung und damit verbundenen Schadensersatzan-sprüchen ausgesetzt sehen. So können sol-che Forderungen von Seiten der Anteilseig-ner, Angestellten, Gläubigern, Behörden und Rechnungsprüfern kommen.

 

Ein Versicherungsschutz hiergegen kann durch eine Directors and Officers Liability Insurance („D&O“) erreicht werden. Eine solche D&O wird von der Gesellschaft für ihre Direktoren abgeschlossen und umfasst Versicherungsschutz bzgl. Schadensersatz (seitens Gläubiger, Vertragspartner, ggf. auch seitens der Gesellschaft und der Gesell-schafter)- und Verfahrenskosten (Anwälte, Sachverständige etc.).

 

  1. Berufung / Abberufung eines Direktors

 

Ferner soll darauf eingegangen werden, wie ein Direktor in sein Amt berufen und wieder abberufen werden kann. Auch die Möglich-keit des Ausschlusses eines Direktors, etwa durch das Board selbst oder durch ein Ge-richt, soll erläutert werden.

 

  1. Berufung eines Direktors

 

Die Berufung und Abberufung der Direkto-ren findet durch das Annual General Mee-ting („AGM“) oder ein Extraordinary Gene-ral Meeting („EGM“) statt. Das Verfahren, nach dem Direktoren berufen werden, wird in der Satzung der Gesellschaft und in der CO unter Section 460 festgelegt.

 

Üblicherweise werden die ersten Direktoren in der Satzung benannt oder in einer von den Unterzeichnern des Gesellschaftsvertra-ges (AoA) unterzeichneten Stellungnahme der Direktoren. Danach werden Direktoren durch das General Meeting der Gesellschaft ernannt.

 

Gemäß Cap 622H Companies (Model Articles) Notice, Schedule 2, Section 22 ha-ben theoretisch auch Direktoren selbst das Recht, jeder Zeit selbst einen Direktor zu ernennen. So verleiht üblicherweise die Sat-zung dem Board das Recht, Direktoren zu benennen, welche dann durch das nächste AGM bestätigt werden. Einem ernannten Direktor sollte eine formale Bestätigung ausgefertigt werden, in welcher erklärt wird, von wann bis wann wer mit welcher Funkti-on Mitglied des Boards ist.

 

  1. Abberufung eines Direktors

 

Die Abberufung eines Direktors ist in Section 462 und 463 CO geregelt. Die Vor-schrift ist weder durch Satzung noch durch Gesellschaftsvertrag abdingbar.

 

 

Eine Abberufung ist durch Beschluss der Mitglieder des General Meetings mit einer einfachen Mehrheit (Bare Majority) möglich. Eine Abberufung durch das BoD ist dage-gen nicht möglich.

 

Es ist eine Ankündigung gegenüber der Ge-sellschaft mindestens 28 Tage vor dem AGM/EGM erforderlich durch die Person, welche die Abberufungsresolution beabsich-tigt (Section 462 (4) und Section 578 CO).

 

Die Gesellschaft muss sodann unverzüglich dem betroffenen Direktor und mindestens 21 Tage vor dem General Meeting den Mit-gliedern des Meetings Mitteilung über die beabsichtigte Resolution machen. Der be-troffene Direktor hat ein Recht, in diesem Meeting gehört zu werden. Auch kann er sich schriftlich den Mitgliedern des Meetings mitteilen oder das Verlesen einer Mitteilung auf dem Meeting verlangen.

 

Damit ein Direktor sich nicht gegen die Mehrheit der Anteilseigner im Amt halten kann, dürfen keine Anteile eine höhere Stimmgewichtung für Abstimmung über die Abberufung eines Direktors haben, als sie bei einer Abstimmung über andere Angele-genheiten hätten. Ansprüche des Direktors auf Abfindung oder Schadensersatz infolge der Abberufung werden durch die Abberu-fung nach S. 462 nicht beeinträchtigt.

 

Darüber hinaus sollte stets überprüft werden ob der Direktor ein Angestelltenverhältnis hat und ob durch die Abberufung nicht der Arbeitsvertrag gebrochen wird.

 

  1. Ausschluss eines Direktors

 

Auch ist der Ausschluss eines Direktors entweder nach Bestimmungen der Satzung oder der Companies (Winding Up and Miscellaneous Provisions) Ordinance (Cap 32) möglich.

 

Je nach Satzung kann dies der Fall sein, wenn ein Direktor unzurechnungsfähig oder zahlungsunfähig wird, regelmäßig ohne Be-gründung nicht an Sitzungen des Boards teilnimmt oder wenn er von allen anderen Direktoren zum Rücktritt aufgefordert wird. Eine Reihe von Gründen, nach denen ein Ausschluss möglich ist, findet sich in Com-panies (Winding Up and Miscellaneous Pro-visions) Ordinance (Chapter 32) Sections 168C ff.

 

Nach Cap 622, Section 480 CO stellt das Wahrnehmen der Funktion eines Direktors als noch nicht entlasteter Konkursschuldner ein Vergehen dar, welches mit Geld- bis hin zu Freiheitsstrafe geahndet wird.

 

Nach Voraussetzungen der S.168c bis S.168s Companies (Winding Up and Miscellaneous Provisions) Ordinance kann das Gericht ge-gen eine Person für einen Zeitraum von 1 bis 15 Jahren eine Ausschlussanordnung ver-fügen. Unter gewissen Umständen muss das Gericht sogar einen solchen Ausschluss ver-hängen. Durch einen solchen wird die Per-son daran gehindert als Direktor, Insolvenz-verwalter oder Manager einer Gesellschaft tätig zu werden oder direkt oder indirekt bei der Gründung oder im Management einer Firma mitzuwirken.

 

Gründe für einen Ausschluss liegen unter anderem auch dann vor, wenn eine Verurtei-lung wegen eines strafbaren Vergehens in Zusammenhang mit der Gründung, dem Management oder der Auflösung einer Ge-sellschaft vorliegt. Oder wenn eine andau-ernde Nichterfüllung der Pflichten aus der Companies Ordinance seitens des Direktors gegenüber dem Registrar gegeben ist.

 

Zum Ausschluss kommt es auch, wenn das Gericht zu der Überzeugung gelangt, dass die Person ein Vergehen i.S.d. S.275 Com-panies (Winding Up and Miscellaneous Pro-visions) Ordinance, folglich einen Betrug zum Nachteil der Gläubiger bei Abwicklung eines Geschäfts, oder eine andere Form des Betruges oder Pflichtverletzung gegenüber der Gesellschaft begangen hat.

 

Auch wenn das Gericht überzeugt ist, dass das Verhalten als Direktor während der Ab-

 

 

wicklung der Insolvenz einer Gesellschaft die Person ungeeignet zur Beteiligung am Management einer Gesellschaft macht, er-folgt ein Ausschluss.

 

Im Falle, dass der Financial Secretary der Meinung sein sollte, dass ein solcher Aus-schluss im öffentlichen Interesse wäre, kann dieser eine Ausschlussanordnung beantra-gen.

 

Kommt die betroffene Person oder kom-men auch andere Mitglieder der Gesellschaft der Ausschlussanordnung nicht nach, stellt dies nach S.168m bis S.168n ein Vergehen dar, welches sogar eine Freiheitsstrafe zur Folge haben kann. Auch haftet nach S.168o eine Person, die wissentlich Anordnungen einer ausgeschlossenen Person folgt, für die der Gesellschaft daraus entstehenden Schä-den.

 

VII. Amtsniederlegung durch einen Di-rektor

 

Nach Section 464 CO hat ein Direktor je-derzeit die Möglichkeit, sein Amt niederzule-gen, vorausgesetzt die Satzung enthält keine Regelung, die dem entgegensteht.

 

Zu beachten ist hier, dass nach Glossop vs Glossop (1907) die Rücktrittserklärung nicht zurückgenommen werden kann und un-mittelbar wirksam ist. Nach dem Urteil

Latchford Premier Cinema Ldt vs Ennion (1931) ist dies sogar dann der Fall, wenn sie nur mündlich abgegeben wird.

 

Nach S. 464 CO ist der Rücktritt als schrift-liche Mitteilung an das „Registered Office“ zu senden. Drei Tage danach muss die Ge-sellschaft den Registrar zur Erfüllung der Verpflichtung aus S.645 über die Amtsnie-derlegung benachrichtigen.

 

Auch endet die Amtsausübung eines Direk-tors turnusmäßig (Rotation). So sollen nach Art.92 des Table A jedes Jahr die Direkto-ren, die sich seit ihrer Wahl am längsten im Amt befinden, zurücktreten. Ein Direktor, der sein Amt aufgrund der „Rotation“ nie-derlegt, kann wieder zum Direktor gewählt werden.

 

VIII. Folgen der Abberufung / Amtsniederlegung

 

Wird ein Direktor durch das General Mee-ting nach Section 462 f CO abberufen, wird eine Kompensation oder ein Schadensersatz für den Verlust des Amtes hierdurch nicht beeinträchtigt.

 

Je nach Vertrag des Direktors kann eine Ab-berufung für die Gesellschaft zu einigen Kosten führen. Grundsätzlich bemisst sich der Schadensersatz bei einem befristeten Vertrag nach dem Gehalt, welches bis zum Ablauf der Frist noch gezahlt worden wäre.

 

Im Falle, dass in seinem Vertrag das Gehalt pro Tag oder ein Jahresgehalt festgelegt sind, hat ein Direktor Anspruch auf einen ange-messenen Teil des Jahresgehalts, wenn seine Amtsführung endet. Nach Healy vs Francaise Rubastic SA (1917) ist dies sogar der Fall, wenn der Grund für die Beendigung ein Fehlverhalten des Direktors war.

 

Zahlungen in Treu und Glauben an einen Direktor als Ersatz für Vertragsbrüchigkeit oder als Ruhestandsgeld im Bezug auf ver-gangene Dienste bedürfen keiner Genehmi-gung durch das General Meeting. Wenn je-doch Zahlungen als Kompensation für den Verlust des Amtes oder in Zusammenhang mit dem Ausscheiden aus dem Amte getätigt

 

 

werden, ist die Genehmigung durch die Mit-glieder des General Meetings nötig. Dies ist auch bei Zahlungen in Form von Eigen-tums- oder Anteilsübertragung der Fall (Sections 518 and 521 CO).

 

Bezüglich Ruhestandszahlungen ist zu be-achten, dass die Gesellschaft nach Common Law kein Recht hat, Handlungen vorzu-nehmen, die nicht in ihrem eigenen Interesse sind. So muss die Zahlung einer Pension von den im Gesellschaftsvertrag festgelegten Zielen umfasst sein.

 

Gesellschaften die die Modell Articles an-wenden, haben nach deren Art. 22 f die Möglichkeit, dass die Direktoren an Stelle der Gesellschaft Pensionszahlungen oder Gratifikationen im Zusammenhang mit dem Ruhestand eines Direktors leisten.

 

  1. Schlussbemerkung

 

Dieses kurze Memorandum stellt eine knap-pe Einführung in die Regelungen bezüglich des BoD dar, inhaltlich auf Private Compa-nies beschränkt. Es sollen lediglich die Grundprinzipien, welche allen Limited Companies gleich sind, verdeutlicht werden. Je nach Art der Gesellschaft und den Um-ständen des jeweiligen Einzelfalles, sind die Vorschriften und Kasuistik weit komplizier-ter, als hier ausgeführt und sind auf die je-weilige Gesellschaft individuell anzupassen.

 

 

Anhang 1

 

 

P O W E R     O F     A T T O R N E Y

 

 

 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN

 

 

 

[…/name of the company],

 

 

a company incorporated under the laws of the Hong Kong SAR and having its registered office at […] (hereinafter referred to as the “PRINCIPAL“) is desirous to appoint a person as its true and lawful attorney with powers as described below, being empowered to manage the interests, activities, programs and affairs of the PRINCIPAL in such manner as it deems fit, and in particu-lar to appoint and remove attorneys and to delegate to this person powers and authorities of the

 

PRINCIPAL.

 

 

The PRINCIPAL hereby appoints

 

 

Mr. […], born on […]

 

Holder of […/nationality]

 

Passport No. […]

 

currently residing at […] (hereinafter referred to as “ATTORNEY“) to be the PRINCIPAL’s true and lawful attorney, and to act as such in full compliance with the policy of the PRINCIPAL and any decisions and instructions given by the Board of Directors of the PRINCIPAL and/or the managing director of the PRINCIPAL and any other restrictions contained in this Power of Attorney:

 

  1. To act as the ATTORNEY of the PRINCIPAL and to direct, manage and/or superin-

 

tend the PRINCIPAL’s business affairs in [ ], and to employ and discharge employees, purchase, take on by lease or otherwise acquire and hold office space and procure sup-plies, materials and equipments needed for the business of the PRINCIPAL.

 

Any purchases in the name of the PRINCIPAL exceeding per case in total EUR […] (says: EUR […]) shall require the prior written approval of at least one direc-tor of the PRINCIPAL.

 

  • To conclude proceedings, negotiate, execute and deal with any Hong Kong government ministry, department, office and/or other governmental authority, and secure necessary permits, licenses and/or concessions for the business of the PRINCIPAL as well as exe-cute and certify corresponding documents.

 

 

  • To endorse or deposit to the PRINCIPAL’s credit in bank’s cheques, drafts, monies, notes, and other evidence of value; to draw and sign cheques against such deposits for such moneys as may be necessary from time to time in the transaction of business.

 

 

  • To commence, file, prosecute, defend and carry to completion all actions or legal pro-ceedings at all levels in the Hong Kong courts or before other tribunals and Hong Kong governmental organizations which the PRINCIPAL may have, both civil and criminal, involving any parties, including bankruptcy and liquidation proceedings against any natu-ral or juristic person, and if, in the discretion of the ATTORNEY, it seems wise, to settle or compromise, refer to arbitration, or take such other steps as may be suitable in the foregoing, including the power to receive money or properties from any court, govern-mental organization, administration tribunal or natural juristic person.

 

 

  • To accept bills of exchange, borrow money by loan or overdraft, pledge the credit of the PRINCIPAL, encumber the property of the PRINCIPAL as security thereof in the way of pledge, mortgage, or hypothecation, to issue trust receipts and execute agency agree-ments.

 

 

  • To substitute and appoint an Attorney or Attorneys to perform any of the purposes aforesaid as the ATTORNEY deems fit and to revoke such appointment in his discretion and to appoint another substitute or other substitutes from time to time.

 

 

  • In general and within the boundaries hereof, to do all other acts, deeds, matters and things whatsoever for all or any of the purposes aforesaid as amply and effectively to all

 

 

intents and purposes as far as the PRINCIPAL might or could have done if he had acted personally.

 

 

This Power of Attorney shall be effective

 

 

from […/its date of execution]

 

 

and shall

 

expire on […],

 

 

except prolonged in writing by the PRINCIPAL prior to the above expiration date.

 

 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the PRINCIPAL has caused this Power of Attorney to be executed in its name and on its behalf, and its corporate name and seal to be affixed.

 

 

For the PRINCIPAL

 

___________________________________

_______________________

 

 

 

 

WITNESS

Mr. […]

AUTHORISED SIGNATURE

 

Director

 

__________________________________

_______________________

 

 

 

 

WITNESS

Mr. […]

AUTHORISED SIGNATURE

 

Director

 

For the ATTORNEY:

 

___________________________________

_______________________

Mr.

 

 

WITNESS

[…]

 

 

Anhang 2

 

 

 

Appointment Letter

 

 

Dear Mr./Mrs./Ms. [NAME],

 

 

On behalf of the Board of [COMPANY NAME], I write to appoint you as a director of [COM-PANY NAME].

 

 

It is proposed that, on receipt of your signed consent to act, you will be appointed on the Board until the next Annual General Meeting, which is scheduled to be held on [DATE]. The Board in-tends that you should be nominated for election by the shareholders at this meeting for a period of one year. At the conclusion of that period you will be eligible for re-election. The composition of the Board is reviewed annually by the company in order to ensure that the membership of the Board is in the best interest of the company.

 

 

The Board schedules regular meetings, usually on [DATE], which last approximately [DURA-TION]. There may be an annual two day board conference and additional meetings may be called to deal with urgent and important matters. The attendance of directors is expected at all board meetings unless leave of absence has been previously agreed with the Chairman. It is expected that each director will serve on at least one board committee. Over the last few years the time spent on their duties by members of the Board has averaged [TIME] per year.

 

 

Currently the remuneration of directors is [CURRENCY] [VALUE] per annum, paid monthly in arrears. Additional fees for committee work or other special activities are [CURRENCY] [VALUE]. No retirement benefits are provided. Expenses incurred in the discharge of a direc-tor’s duties may be reclaimed by submission of a written claim which should be sent to the [PERSON RESPONSIBLE] and countersigned by the Chairman.

 

 

The Company indemnifies directors and pays part of the premium for a Directors’ and Officers’

 

Liability Insurance Policy. A copy of the arrangements is enclosed.

 

The directors have agreed to be bound by the enclosed Board Protocol which covers such mat-ters as the duties of directors, confidentiality, and access to expert advice at the company’s ex-pense, contracts between directors and company executives, the handling of conflicts of interest and the positions of the Chairman and the Company Secretary. You will note that if a director should breach the Protocol he would be expected to resign.

 

 

A copy of the Company’s Memorandum and Articles of Association, a list of the other directors with brief CV’s and a copy of a company organization chart are attached for your information.

 

 

Yours sincerely, [NAME]

 

 

Chairman

 

 

A Hong Kong Company’s Board of Directors, –

– Function and Liabilities-

 

 

 

June 2014

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information provided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, including any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

  1. Introduction

This Newsletter has been drafted to provide an overview of the functions, powers, duties and liabilities of the Board of Directors (“BoD”) of a limited company in Hong Kong. Only the regulations applicable to private companies will be elaborated herein. The stricter and more complex rules con-cerning public and especially listed compa-nies are solely covered in footnotes.

 

  1. Structure of a Limited Liability

Company

 

To understand the BoD correctly, one has to understand the structure of a limited liability company in Hong Kong.

 

A Hong Kong limited liability company basi-cally consists of three parties:

 

  • The shareholdere. the owners (also called members);

 

  • The BoD which is composed of the company’s directors; and

 

  • the Company Secretary

 

Principally any natural and/or juristic person can be shareholder and/or director, as well as Company Secretary. The capital of the company does not have to be (fully) paid up and no interest incurs on outstanding capital. It is only if the BoD makes an official pay-ment request that the money must paid in

 

There are 07 different types of capital:

 

  • Registered Capital: This is the capital which the Articles of Association (“AoA”) state is the capital of the

 

 

Company, which is registered and divid-ed into shares.

 

  • Authorised Capital: The maximum capital of the company.

 

  • Issued Capital: The sum of Authorised Capital that has actually been issued by the company (via shares). The Issued Capital is always equal to or lower than the Authorised Capital amount.

 

  • Paid up (or paid in) Capital: The capi-tal which the shareholders have already paid in and made available to the com-pany.

 

  • Outstanding Capital (uncalled capi-tal): The capital which has been author-ised as the company’s capital but has not yet been paid in by the shareholders. In Hong Kong, no interest has to be paid on outstanding capital.

 

  • Equity Capital: This is the capital which is contributed by the owners (the shareholders), added or subtracted by accumulated gains and losses. Equity is the residual value of the business enter-prise that belongs to the shareholders. The value of equity capital is computed by estimating the current market value of assets (cash capital plus fixed assets) owned by the company from which the total of all liabilities is subtracted.

 

  • Debt Capital: Debt capital is the capital which has been loaned given to the company by third parties and which is expected to be repaid (e.g. banks, finan-cial institutions or shareholder loans).

 

 

 

 

 

III. Functions of the BoD

  1. The Board’s General Duties

The BoD is the company’s governing body and defines the principal direction of the company, in the best interest of the compa-ny (which is not necessarily identical to the shareholders’ interests). The BoD also se-lects and supervises the managers of the company who have to implement the BoD’s decisions.

 

The BoD’s tasks involve:

 

  • Preparation and execution of decisions by the Annual General (Shareholder) Meeting (“AGM”);

 

  • Determining long term strategic objec-tives and policies;

 

  • Appointment of the management, de-termination of the management struc-ture;

 

  • Supervision of the management. Taking corrective action if long term objectives are not sufficiently executed.

 

  • Reporting to the shareholders about the company’s activities.

 

A BoD resolution will be passed if it is ap-proved by a simple majority of votes.

 

Depending on the size of the company some tasks may be delegated to committees or the management. However, the ultimate respon-sibility for such delegated tasks remains with the BoD.

 

  1. Members of the Board

Any person occupying the position of a di-rector and fulfilling the respective tasks is regarded a director even if no official ap-pointment has taken place.

 

Specifically if a person, acts like a director towards third parties (external representation of a company), the company will be bound by contracts entered into by him, as if this

 

person had the actual authority of a director. This is known as the “Turquand rule“1.

 

If the BoD continuously acts in accordance with the instructions of a person who is not appointed as a director, then this person is a

 

“shadow director” and therefore also re-garded as a director.

 

All directors on the BoD share the same basic responsibility. However the Articles of Association can specify different positions in the BoD.

 

For example nearly every company appoints a BoD Chairman to organise and preside over board meetings. He also acts as the BoD’s representative to the outside. Further, a Managing Director is often appointed, to act as the head of the administra-tive/management structure and to be re-sponsible for the implementation of the BoD’s instructions and goals.

 

To fulfil their duties, the Chairman and the Managing Director are given additional powers and rights by the BoD. It is also possible for one person to hold both posi-tions. Whether this is suitable depends on the respective company.

 

It is important to pass a BoD resolution, which determines who has signing authority for the company’s bank accounts.

 

To ease the working procedures, it is also possible to give a power of attorney (Annex 1) to a member of the BoD or a third per-son. The power of attorney must include the following particulars:

 

  • Start and end date of the power of attorney;

 

  • Extent of the authority;

 

  • Whether it is possible to issue sub-authorisations; and

 

  • Revocation of the authority (the saf-est option would be to include a

 

1 Royal British Bank vs. Turquand (1856)

 

 

right to revoke the authority at any time.)

 

  1. Powers and Duties of a Director

Regarding the powers and duties of directors it is necessary to differentiate between pri-vate and public companies.

 

(1) Private Companies

 

Private companies are companies in which the shareholders have only limited rights to assign their shares. The number of share-holders is restricted to fifty and offers to the public to subscribe for shares are prohibited (Section 11 Companies Ordinance). Con-cerning private companies Hong Kong’s Companies Ordinance and non statutory guidelines have to be considered.

 

(2) Public Companies

 

A public company is one which is not a pri-vate company, i.e. it does not fulfil the crite-ria mentioned above2.

 

(3) Powers of a Director

 

The company’s powers are derived from the law and from its AoA. These powers are delegated to the BoD. The powers and du-ties of the directors are therefore set out in the Articles of Association. This includes all powers necessary to exercise the duties of the BoD.

 

The directors have the right to call board meetings and to be notified of scheduled meetings. If any director is not notified of a BoD meeting then all proceedings which are carried out therein are void. In order to con-duct business at a BoD meeting a certain

 

2 In the case of a public company the Companies Ordinance contains stricter rules. For listed companies additionally the regulations of the HKEx rules, securities ordinance, securities and futures ordinance will apply. For public companies the non-statutory guidelines are also relevant.

 

 

 

quorum of directors must be present (de-pending on the Articles of Association).

 

It is also possible to hold a “paper meetings” which by circulating resolutions between the director (e.g. by post or email), so that the physical presence of the BoD members is not required.

 

Minutes of the meeting must be taken for every BoD meeting. These minutes must be kept in the company’s registered office by the Company Secretary. A failure to comply with this rule can be subject to a daily fine.

 

All directors bear equal responsibility for the decisions made by the BoD, even if they did not agree with and/or voted against it. The only way to escape this responsibility is if the director declares his resignation before the vote. Further, once the BoD has issued a decision, a director is obliged to comply with it.

 

If a director deems a decision to be com-mercially unwise, this should be discussed and recorded in the minutes. Depending on the Articles of Association the director may have the right to call a board meeting for such purpose. If the director does not have such a right, he can still seek support from the shareholders to call for an Extraordinary General Meeting (“EGM”) in order to re-solve the issue.

 

If a director, regards a decision not just as commercially unwise but also as unlawful, it is his duty to take action against it. In doing so he may seek internal and external help and support. The company’s auditors, the shareholders or the financial secretary3 could provide such help.

 

The directors are entitled to any information necessary to fulfil their functions. For in-

 

3 Concerning public companies, organisations such as the HKEx, the Securities Commissioner or the Panel on Takeover & Mergers come into consideration.

 

 

stance, a director has access to the manage-ment accounts and statistical reports in or-der to supervise the management, business plans and budgets and determine the com-pany’s policy.

 

A director requires the shareholder’s ap-proval to issue shares of the company.

 

(4) Duties of a Director

 

The directors exercise their rights as fiduci-aries of the company. From this fiduciary position arises several basic duties.

 

Basic Duties

 

  • The director has to act bona fide for the benefit of the company. It can some-times be difficult to define the interests of the company. Both the long and short term interests of the company have to be taken into consideration. Also the rela-tionship between a parent company and subsidiary can put the director in a diffi-cult situation. In this case the director owes his duty primarily to the company to whose board he is appointed.

 

  • The director has to exercise his powers for their proper purpose. The powers which are given to the director by the Articles of Association must only be used for purposes for which they were intended.

 

  • Conflicts of interests (i.e. between. the company’s interest and a director’s per-sonal interests) have to be avoided. A di-rector must not take personal advantage of the company’s opportunities. The court requires a high standard of honesty from fiduciaries. Secret profits, which a director makes in course of his function through the use of a corporate oppor-tunity, which are not disclosed to the company will be forfeited to the compa-ny.

 

 

 

The fiduciary position of a director may make it necessary for them to declare his in-terests to the company. For example he may be required to declare if he holds shares in another company.

 

The execution of contracts between a direc-tor and the company is particularly vulnera-ble to conflicts of interest. As such the Companies Ordinance contains complex rules prohibiting the grant of loans or similar transactions in favour of a director or a per-son connected to a director.

 

The general rule is that a company may not grant a loan or provide any security in con-nection with a loan to a director or a com-pany controlled by a director.

 

A private company however can via an AGM or EGM resolution grant loans to its direc-tors. Furthermore a company whose ordi-nary course of business includes granting loans and securities is also permitted to grant a loan to its directors without a resolution as long as this transaction is part of the ordi-nary course of business. In other words the director can not be given lower rate, favour-able terms etc. for the loan in question. However, these exceptions only apply if the total liability of the company under all issued securities does not exceed 5% of its net as-sets.

 

Standard of care and skill

 

The standard of care and skill which a direc-tor is subjected to whilst fulfilling his duties and tasks is discussed in RE City Equitable Fire Insurance Co Ltd (1925). The court laid down three points, which summarise a direc-tor’s duty of care.

 

  • A director, in the performance of his du-ties, does not need to apply a greater de-gree of skill than may be reasonably ex-pected from a person of his knowledge and experience. He has to exercise a de-gree of diligence like an ordinary man

 

 

 

might be expected to apply in looking af-ter his own interests in the particular cir-cumstances.

 

  1. A director is not bound to attend all BoD meetings, though he ought to at-tend whenever he is reasonably able to do so. Due to the intermittent nature of his duties he is not obliged to give con-tinuous attention to the affairs of his company.

 

  1. In respect of all duties that may be trans-ferred to another official a director is, in the absence of grounds for suspicion, justified in relying on that official to per-form such duties honestly.

 

In Secretary of State for Trade vs. Baker (No 6) (1999) the court elaborated three other points.

 

  • The directors have both collectively and individually a continuing duty to acquire and maintain a sufficient knowledge of the company’s business to enable them to properly discharge their duties.

 

  • The power to delegate particular func-tions does not discharge a director from his duty to supervise the execution of the delegated functions.

 

  • For these duties no universal application can be formulated, the extent of the duty depends on each particular case, includ-ing the director’s role in the manage-ment.

 

Under the new Companies Ordinance (Sec-tion 465), for the first time, there is a certain statute provision determining a mixed objec-tive and subjective test that determines the standards for director’s duties.

 

Directors Report

At the end of each financial year the direc-tors must prepare a report in respect of the profit and loss of the company for that year

 

 

 

and the state of the company’s business op-erations. The report must be approved and signed by the BoD. It is then attached to the balance sheet, which is presented to the shareholders at the next AGM or EGM. It must also be sent to everybody entitled to receive it, 21 days before the said meeting takes place. All shortcomings whether in signing the report or in above mentioned re-quirements will result in repercussions, such as fines or even imprisonment.

 

  1. The Board’s Liability

It is possible to impose unlimited liability onto the directors in the AoA, meaning the amount of damages to which a director can be held liable by the company or third par-ties is not limited. In a limited liability com-pany only the liability of the shareholders is limited.

 

Any exemption or indemnification of a di-rector’s liability whether it is in the Articles of Association or any other contract in re-gards to negligence, default, breach of duty or breach of trust, is void.

 

The AoA make it possible to indemnify a di-rector against liability he has incurred whilst defending proceedings against him, in which judgment is given in his favour. Further pro-tection can be achieved through Directors & Officers” liability insurance (“D&O”).

 

Furthermore the Companies Ordinance provides a number of sanctions in case of noncompliance by directors, including

 

“shadow directors”.

 

  1. Internal Liability

China Everbright-IHD Pacific Ltd vs Ch’ng Poh (2003) concluded that the director is liable for any loss to the company due to his breach of duty. If a breach of duty is com-mitted by several directors they are jointly and individually liable.

 

 

  1. External Liability

As a basic principle, the company as a legal entity is solely liable for external debts and obligations. Consequently a director has no personal liability towards the company’s creditors, as long as he clearly acts on behalf of the company. There are a few exceptions to this principle.

 

If a director knows or ought to have known that their dormant company (as defined in the Companies Ordinance) has entered into certain transactions then they will be per-sonally liable for any consequential debts and obligations of the company. Where a company commits a criminal offence the di-rector who is in control of the relevant activ-ity may also be indictable. Further directors can also incur personal collateral liability e.g. by executing a personal guarantee in support of a corporate loan.

 

  1. Insurance Coverage

A director may be exposed to accusations of breach of duty and related demands of dam-ages from various sources. Such claims may be made by the shareholders, employees, creditors, authorities and auditors of the company. Insurance coverage against such accusations can be achieved with a D&O policy which is usually purchased by the company for its directors and covers damag-es and defence costs (lawyers, expert wit-nesses, court fees, etc.) for claims from con-tract partners, creditors and even sharehold-ers of the company against the named direc-tor.

 

As noted above any provision which fully exempts or indemnifies a director is void under Hong Kong law. This includes insur-ance coverage. However a D&O policy which covers damages and defence costs ex-cept in the case of fraud in relation to the company or third parties is valid.

 

  1. Appointment/Removal of    a

Director

 

This section shall elaborate upon how a di-rector is appointed into his office and how he can be removed from it. The possibility of disqualification of a director either by the board or by court shall also be explained.

 

  1. Appointment of a Director

Both the appointment and removal of a di-rector is conducted at an AGM/EGM. The procedure under which a director is ap-pointed is determined in the Articles of As-sociation. Usually the company’s first direc-tors are named in the Articles.

 

Technically directors may also be appointed by the BoD when there is a casual vacancy to be filled, or the total number of directors set out in the AoA is not exceeded. Howev-er the appointment must then be approved in the next AGM/EGM. A formal confir-mation should be issued to any newly ap-pointed director (Annex 2).

 

  1. Removal of a Director

A Director may be removed by passing an ordinary shareholder resolution. The com-pany must notify the Companies Registry of the removal. Unlike appointments, the BoD has no authority to remove a director.

 

To ensure that a director does not remain in office against the will of the majority of the shareholders no shares may carry higher weighted voting rights for a resolution to remove a director than it would carry for a resolution on general matters.

 

A notice of the intention to pass such a resolution must be given to the company at least 28 days prior to the relevant AGM/EGM. The director must also be no-tified at least 21 days in advance of the meet-ing.

 

The director concerned has the right to speak at the meeting. He is also entitled to communicate his point of view to the mem-bers of the meeting in writing.

 

Depending on the circumstances a director may be able to claim compensation or dam-ages as a result of his removal from office.

 

Finally, if the Director is also an employee then the shareholders should consider whether such a removal would breach their service contract.

 

  1. Disqualification of a Director

A director may be disqualified in accordance with the Articles of Association or the Companies (Winding Up and Miscellaneous Provisions) Ordinance (Cap 32).

 

necessarily involves a finding that he acted fraudulently or dishonestly.

 

If after an investigation the financial secre-tary thinks it is justified and in the public in-terest, he may apply for a disqualification order against a director or shadow director.

 

It is an offence and punishable by fine and/or imprisonment to not comply with a disqualification order. This not only con-cerns the person against whom the disquali-fication order was issued but also the com-pany and its officers. A person who is in-volved in the management of a company in contravention of a disqualification order or who knowingly acts on the instructions of a disqualified person will be liable for all con-sequential debts incurred by the company.

 

 

Most Articles state that a director will be disqualified if they are of unsound mind, bankrupt, fails to attend BoD meetings on a regular basis or is asked by all other directors of the board to resign. Cap 32 lists a number of standard reasons for the disqualification of a director.

 

According to the Companies Ordinance (Cap 622, Section 480) it is an offence, pun-ishable with a fine and/or imprisonment, for a person to act as a director if they are an undischarged bankrupt.

 

The court may issue a disqualification order against a person, for a specified period of time ranging from 1 to 15 years. Such an or-der prevents a person from acting as a direc-tor, liquidator or manager of a company or to be directly or indirectly concerned with the setting up or management of a company for the specified period.

 

The grounds upon which a person may be disqualified by the court include if a person is convicted for an indictable offence in connection with the formation, management or liquidation of a company or any other in-dictable offence his conviction for which

 

VII.   Resignation of a Director

A director may resign from office at any time, so long as the Articles of Association or the director’s service contract do not pro-vide otherwise. Following Glossop vs Glossop (1907) upon giving notice of the resignation it becomes immediately effective and cannot be withdrawn. In Latchford Premier Cinema Ldt vs Ennion (1931) it was held that this was the case even if the resignation was given verbal-ly.

 

The resignation has to be sent to the regis-tered office in written form. Afterwards the company has to notify the companies’ regis-trar to notify them of the registration.

 

VIII. Consequences of a remov-al/resignation

If a director is removed by an AGM/EGM, his right to compensation or damages for the loss of office are not affected.

 

Damages, in case of a fixed term contract, are calculated according to the salary which would have been paid during the remaining term of the contract.

 

 

If the contract stipulates the remuneration on a per day or per year basis, the director is entitled to an appropriate part of his annual salary, when his office ends. In Healy vs Fran-caise Rubastic SA (1917) the court ruled that the director was even entitled to this pay-ment, even if the reason for vacating his of-fice was the director’s own misconduct.

 

 

 

In respect of retirement benefits and pen-sions it must be borne in mind that the company cannot take any action which is not in its own interest or for its own benefit. Therefore the payment of pensions has to be line with the company’s objectives as de-fined in the Articles of Association.

 

 

Bona fide payments to a director as com-pensation for breach of contract or as pen-sion in respect of past services do not need to be approved by a shareholder meeting, whereby a special approval in terms of pro-cedures is required (Sections 518 and 521 CO)

 

If however, the company makes a compen-sation payment for loss of office or in con-nection with retirement from office, the ap-proval of a shareholder meeting is required. Shareholder approval is also required, if the payment is made in the form of a transfer of property or shares.

 

  1. Conclusion

This short summary can only provide a brief introduction to the provisions concerning BoDs in private companies. The aim of this summary is to illustrate the fundamental principles which all limited companies have in common. Depending on the type of company and the circumstances of the par-ticular case, the regulations and judicature may be far more complex than described herein and have to be adjusted to the respec-tive company.

 

 

Annex 1

 

P O W E R     O F     A T T O R N E Y

 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN

 

[…/name of the company],

 

a company incorporated under the laws of the Hong Kong S.A.R and having its registered office located at […] (hereinafter referred to as the “PRINCIPLE”) is desirous to appoint a person as its true and lawful attorney with powers as described below, being empowered to manage the in-terests, activities, programs and affairs of the PRINCIPLE in such manner as it deems fit, and in particular to appoint and remove attorneys and to delegate to this person powers and authorities of the PRINCIPLE.

 

The PRINCIPLE does hereby make, constitute and appoint

 

Mr. […],born on[…]

Holder of […/] nationality Passport No. […]

currently residing at […] (hereinafter referred to as “ATTORNEY”) to be the PRINCIPLE’s true and lawful attorney, and to act as such in full compliance with the policy of the PRINCIPLE and any decisions and instructions given by the Board of Directors of the PRINCIPLE and/or the managing director of the PRINCIPLE and any other restrictions contained in this Power of Attorney:

 

  1. To act as the GENERAL MANAGER of the PRINCIPLE and to direct, manage and/or superintend the PRINCIPLE’s business affairs in Hong Kong and in Mainland China, and to employ and discharge employees, purchase, take on by lease or otherwise acquire and hold office space and procure supplies, materials and equipments needed for the business of the PRINCIPLE.

 

Any purchases in the name of the PRINCIPLE exceeding per case in total EUR […] (says: EUR […]) shall require the prior written approval of at least one direc-tor of the PRINCIPLE.

 

  1. To conclude proceedings, negotiate, execute and deal with any Hong Kong government ministry, department, office and/or other governmental authority, and secure necessary permits, licenses and/or concessions for the business of the PRINCIPLE as well as exe-cute and certify corresponding documents.

 

  1. To endorse or deposit to the PRINCIPLE’s credit in bank’s cheques, drafts, monies, notes, and other evidence of value; to draw and sign cheques against such deposits for such moneys as may be necessary from time to time in the transaction of business.

 

  1. To commence, file, prosecute, defend and carry to completion of all actions or legal pro-ceedings at all levels in the Hong Kong courts or before other tribunals and Hong Kong

 

 

 

governmental organizations which the PRINCIPLE may have, both civil and criminal, involving any parties, including bankruptcy and liquidation proceedings against any natu-ral or juristic person, and if, in the discretion of the ATTORNEY, it seems wise, to settle or compromise, refer to arbitration, or take such other steps as may be suitable in the foregoing, including the power to receive money or properties from any court, govern-mental organization, administration tribunal or natural juristic person.

 

  1. To accept bills of exchange, borrow money by loan or overdraft, pledge the credit of the PRINCIPLE, encumber the property of the PRINCIPLE as security thereof in the way of pledge, mortgage, or hypothecation, to issue trust receipts and execute agency agree-ments.

 

  1. To substitute and appoint an Attorney or Attorneys to perform any of the purposes aforesaid as the ATTORNEY deems fit and to revoke such appointment in his discretion and to appoint another substitute or other substitutes from time to time.

 

  1. In general and within the boundaries hereof, to do all other acts, deeds, matters and things whatsoever for all or any of the purposes aforesaid as amply and effectively to all intents and purposes as far as the PRINCIPLE might or could have done if he had acted personally.

 

This Power of Attorney shall be effective

 

from […/its date of execution] and shall

 

expire on […],

 

unless prolonged in writing by the PRINCIPLE prior to the above expiration date.

 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the PRINCIPLE has caused this Power of Attorney to be executed in its name and on its behalf, and its corporate name and seal to be affixed.

 

For the PRINCIPLE

 

___________________________________

_______________________

Mr. […]

 

 

WITNESS

AUTHORISED SIGNATURE

 

Director

 

__________________________________

_______________________

Mr. […]

 

 

WITNESS

AUTHORISED SIGNATURE

 

Director

 

For the ATTORNEY:

 

___________________________________

_______________________

MR.

[…]

 

WITNESS

         

 

 

 

 

Annex 2

 

Appointment Letter

 

Dear Mr./MS. [NAME],

 

On behalf of the Board of [COMPANY NAME], I write to invite you to accept appointment as a director of [COMPANY NAME].

 

It is proposed that, on receipt of your signed consent to act, you will be appointed to the Board until the next Annual General Meeting which is scheduled to be held on [DATE]. The Board in-tends that you should be nominated for election by the shareholders at that meeting for a period of [DURATION]. At the conclusion of that period you will be eligible for re-election. The com-position of the Board is reviewed annually by the Nomination Committee in order to ensure that the membership of the Board is in the best interest of [COMPANY NAME]. It is normal prac-tice on this Board for directors to serve no more than [NUMBER] terms of [DURATION] each.

 

The Board schedules regular meetings, usually on [DATE], which last approximately [DURA-TION]. There is an annual two day board conference and additional meetings may be called to deal with urgent and important matters. The attendance of directors is expected at all board meetings unless a leave of absence has been previously agreed with the Chairman. It is expected that each director will serve on at least one board committee. Over the past few years the time spent on their duties by members of the Board has averaged [TIME] per year. No special duties apply to your appointment.

 

Currently the remuneration of directors is [CURRENCY] [VALUE] per annum, paid monthly in arrears. Additional fees for committee work or other special activities are [CURRENCY] [VALUE]. No retirement benefits are provided. Expenses incurred in the discharge of a direc-tor’s duties may be reclaimed by submission of a written claim which should be sent to the [PER-SON RESPONSIBLE] and countersigned by the Chairman.

 

The Company indemnifies directors and pays part of the premium for a Directors’ and Officers’

Liability Insurance Policy. A copy of the arrangements is enclosed.

 

The directors have agreed to be bound by the enclosed Board Protocol which covers such mat-ters as the duties of directors, confidentiality, and access to expert advice at the company’s ex-pense, contracts between directors and company executives, the handling of conflicts of interest and the positions of the Chairman and the Company Secretary. You will note that if a director should breach the Protocol he/she would be expected to resign.

 

A copy of the Company’s Memorandum and Articles of Association, a list of the other directors with brief CV’s and a copy of a company organization chart are attached hereto for your infor-mation.

 

Yours sincerely, [NAME]

 

Chairman

 

 

 

 

 

Aktuelle rechtliche Entwicklungen in Hongkong, China und anderen Ländern

 

 

August 2014

 

 

 

 

All rights reserved © Lorenz & Partners 2014

 

Obwohl Lorenz & Partners große Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in diesen Newslettern bereitgestellten

 

Informationen auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass diese eine individuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen können. Lorenz & Partners übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität, Korrektheit oder Vollständigkeit der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Partners, welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nutzung oder Nichtnutzung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informationen verursacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorliegt.

 

 

  1. Hongkonger Gesellschaftsrecht
  • Schutz vor unlauterem Verhalten

Wie in unserem letzten Newsletter über ak-tuelle rechtliche Entwicklungen in Hongkong berichtet (Ausgabe Mai 2014; zum Öffnen bitte hier klicken), trat die neue Companies Ordinance am 03. März 2014 in Kraft. Unter anderem wurden Änderungen der Regeln über unlauteres Verhalten (“Unfair Prejudice”) durch Gesellschafter oder die Gesellschaft vorgenommen (früher Section 168A der alten Companies Ordinance, jetzt Sections 722 bis 726 der neuen Companies Ordinance). Wie ein neuer Fall, über den die Hongkonger Gerichte zu entscheiden hatten, zeigt, können sich mit Hilfe dieser Vorschriften nicht nur Minderheitsgesellschafter einer Gesellschaft gegen unlauteres Verhalten anderer Gesellschafter wehren, sondern auch deren Mehrheitsgesellschafter.

 

 

  1. a) Der Sachverhalt

 

Der Mehrheitsgesellschafter (“Luck”) einer bermudischen Gesellschaft, die an der Hongkonger Börse notiert ist („Hong Kong Stock Exchange“ – “HKSE ”), stellte einen Antrag gemäß Section 168A der alten Com-panies Ordinance wegen des unlauteren Verhaltens eines Minderheitengesellschafters sowie der Gesellschaft. Der Antrag betraf das Abstimmungsverhalten des Minderheitsgesellschafters, der gegen eine Änderung der Satzung (Articles of Association) der Gesellschaft gestimmt hatte, woraufhin der Handel der Anteile der Gesellschaft an der HKSE ausgesetzt wurde.

 

 

  1. b) Die Entscheidung

 

Der Court of First Instance gab dem Antrag statt und ordnete die vom Kläger begehrte Satzungsänderung an. Der beklagte Gesell-schafter legte hiergegen Berufung beim Court of Appeal ein, der jedoch ebenfalls zugunsten des Mehrheitsgesellschafters ent-schied und bestätigte, dass Section 168A auch dem Schutz von Mehrheitsgesellschaf-tern diene.

 

Das Gericht kam zu dem Schluss, dass im vorliegenden Fall ein unlauteres Verhalten vorlag, weil das Blockieren der Satzungsänderung die Wiederaufnahme des Handels der Anteile verhinderte und die Börsennotierung der Gesellschaft gefährdete.

 

Da die Revision zum Court of Final Appeal zugunsten des Minderheitsgesellschafters zugelassen wurde, bleibt abzuwarten, ob die-ser die Auslegung von Section 168A teilt o-der die vorausgegangenen Entscheidungen aufhebt.

 

  • Neue Regelungen zur Darstellung des eingetragenen Firmennamens

Die neue Companies (Disclosure of Compa-ny Name and Liability Status) Regulation (CR – Chap 622B) trifft in Section 4 einige interessante Regelungen bezüglich der Darstellung des Firmennamens, die jede Gesellschaft beachten sollte. Die Nichtbeachtung stellt eine strafbare Handlung dar, für die jeder verantwortlichen Person sowie der Gesellschaft selbst ein Bußgeld der Stufe 3, das bis zu HKD 10,000 beträgt, auferlegt werden kann (Section 7(1)).

 

 

Section 4 der CR sieht vor, dass eine Gesell-schaft ihren vollen eingetragenen Firmen-namen auf Englisch oder Chinesisch ange-ben muss und zwar

 

  • in jedem die Kommunikation der Gesellschaft nach außen betreffen-den Dokument (Geschäftsbriefe, Publikationen, etc.),

 

  • in jedem Dokument, dass eine rechtsgeschäftliche Bindung herbei-führt (Arbeitsverträge, Vergleiche, Urkunden etc.) und

 

  • auf jeder ihrer Webseiten.

 

Daher empfehlen wir die relevanten Doku-mente eingehend zu prüfen und sicherzustel-len, dass der registrierte Firmenname aus-drücklich genannt wird, um Verstöße zu vermeiden.

 

Nach langen Diskussionen, die sich über acht Jahre hingezogen haben, wurde die Employment (Amendment) Bill 2014 im März 2014 in den Legislative Council eingebracht, um einen gesetzlichen An-spruch auf einen Vaterschaftsurlaub von drei Tagen für Arbeitnehmer einzuführen.

 

Um in den Genuss des Vaterschaftsurlaubs zu kommen, muss der Arbeitnehmer dauer-haft bei dem Arbeitgeber beschäftigt sein und seinen Arbeitgeber vorab über seine Absicht Vaterschaftsurlaub zu nehmen informieren.

 

Der Zeitraum in dem der Vaterschaftsurlaub genommen werden kann, soll sechs Wochen vor dem errechneten Geburtstermin begin-nen und zehn Wochen nach dem tatsächli-chen Geburtstermin enden.

 

 

  1. Hong Konger Arbeitsrecht
  • Gesetzliche Altersvorsorge: weitere Änderungen werden erwogen

Wie in unserem letzten Newsletter (Aktuelle rechtliche Entwicklungen in Hong Kong – Ausga-be Mai 2014; zum Öffnen hier klicken) be-richtet, wurde mit Wirkung ab dem 01. Juni 2014 eine Anhebung der Beitragsbemes-sungsgrenze für die gesetzliche Altersvor-sorge („ Mandatory Provident Funds“ – „MPF“) von HKD 25.000 auf HKD 30.000 vorgenommen. Ziel dieser Änderung ist es besserverdienende Arbeitnehmer dabei zu unterstützen, höhere Rücklagen zu bilden.

 

Eine nunmehr geplante Änderung soll die Auszahlungsmodalitäten betreffen: Während Mitglieder die angesparte Gesamtsumme bei ihrer Pensionierung bislang auf einmal abheben müssen, soll es in der nahen Zukunft möglich sein, die angesparte Sum-me in mehreren Raten ausgezahlt zu bekommen.

 

  • Einführung eines Anspruchs auf Vaterschaftsurlaub


Einem Arbeitnehmer, der ununterbrochen für mindestens 40 Wochen beschäftigt war, sollen während des Vaterschaftsurlaubs vier Fünftel seines durchschnittlichen Lohns zustehen.

 

  • Wie schützt man vertrauliche In-formationen?

Eine aktuelle Entscheidung des Hongkonger Court of First Instance zeigt, welche große Bedeutung Informationen für Gesell-schaften haben und wie schwierig es sein kann, diese vor Missbrauch zu schützen – insbesondere durch leitende Angestellte.

 

  1. a) Der Sachverhalt

 

Geklagt wurde von der Gesellschaft Dextra China Limited (“Dextra”) gegen ihren früheren General Manager („GM“).

 

Im Jahr 2009 kam dem Managing Director von Dextra der Verdacht, dass der GM plant, eine eigene, mit Dextra konkurrie-rende Firma aufzubauen. Bei der aus diesem Grund durchgeführten Durchsuchung des Büros des GM wurde eine externe Festplatte gefunden, deren Inhalt den Verdacht bestä-tigte und zudem belegte, dass der GM plan-

 

 

te, 15 Mitarbeiter der Dextra abzuwerben. Aufgrund der Verletzung seiner allgemeinen, aus dem Arbeitsverhältnis erwachsenden Treuepflicht und der Verpflichtung, vertrau-liche Informationen nicht zu missbrauchen, wurde dem GM im Jahr 2009 gekündigt. Dextra beantragte zudem, dem GM die zukünftige Nutzung der Informationen ge-richtlich zu untersagen und ihn zum Ersatz des entgangenen Gewinns und zur Rückgabe der unterschlagenen Informationen zu ver-pflichten.

 

Das Gericht verurteilte den GM daraufhin zu einer Zahlung in Höhe von HKD 1.500.000 und zur Rückgabe der unterschla-genen Informationen und verbot ihm die zukünftige Nutzung.

 

  1. b) Empfehlungen

 

Um vertrauliche Informationen zu schützen, sollten Arbeitgeber Maßnahmen ergreifen, um Situationen wie die soeben dargestellte nach Möglichkeit zu vermeiden. Unsere Vorschläge:

 

  • Klären Sie Ihrer Arbeitnehmer über die Bedeutung vertraulicher Informationen auf;

 

  • Führen Sie schriftliche Richtlinien ein, die die Nutzung entsprechender Informationen und die Konsequenzen eines Verstoßes gegen die Geheimhaltungspflicht regeln;

 

  • Nehmen Sie Vorschriften über den Umgang mit vertraulichen Informatio-nen und das Verbots des Missbrauchs solcher Informationen in die Arbeits-verträge auf;

 

  • Beschränken Sie den Zugang zu ver-trauliche Informationen durch Passwör-ter und machen Sie den Zugriff von ei-ner vorherigen Freigabe abhängig.

 

  1. Hongkonger Wettbewerbs-recht: Auf dem Vormarsch

Die Diskussionen über die Einführung einer Competition Ordinance (CO) reichen zurück in die Zeit vor 1997, als die Gesetzgebungs-kompetenz für Hong Kong noch bei Großbri-

 

tannien lag. Im Jahr 2012 wurde die CO schließlich durch den Legislative Council ver-abschiedet. Seither sind weitere zwei Jahre ver-gangen, ohne dass die CO in Kraft getreten ist. Zwischenzeitlich wurde jedoch die Competition Commission (CC) gegründet und ein Inkrafttreten der CO für frühestens Mitte des Jahres 2015 angekündigt.

 

Die Kommission besteht aus 14 Mitgliedern und wird von Anna Wu geleitet, die auch den Vorsitz der Mandatory Provident Fund Scheme Authority innehat.

 

Die Aufgaben der Kommission bestehen im Wesentlichen darin, Richtlinien bezüglich prozessualer und materiell-rechtlicher As-pekte zu erarbeiten, wobei der Fokus auf der Interpretation der First Conduct Rule, der Second Conduct Rule und der Merger Rules der CO liegt. Einen ersten Entwurf der Richtlinien wird die Kommission im Sep-tember 2014 veröffentlichen. Die Endfas-sung soll in der ersten Hälfte des Jahres 2015, rechtzeitig zum Inkrafttreten der CO fertiggestellt werden.

 

Darüber hinaus sind verschiedene Pro-gramme in Vorbereitung, um das Verständ-nis der Öffentlichkeit für das neue Rege-lungswerk zu erhöhen.

 

Die Competition Ordinance ist ein weiteres Beispiel dafür, wie viel Zeit die Einführung neuer Gesetze in Hongkong in Anspruch nimmt und wie sehr der Einfluss bestimmter Interessengruppen diese noch immer zu verzögern vermag.

 

  1. Hongkonger Vertragsrecht/ Arbeitsrecht: Einführung des „Vertrags zugunsten Dritter“

Zum ersten Mal in der Geschichte Hongkongs wurde ein Gesetz in den Legislation Council eingebracht, das sich mit der Drittwirkung von Verträgen befasst – ein Konzept, das in Europa bereits seit langem bekannt ist.

 

 

 

Derzeit ist es in Hongkong für Dritte un-möglich, Rechte aus Verträgen herzuleiten und durchzusetzen, die nicht durch diese geschlossen wurden. Das neue Recht soll dies unter bestimmten Umständen ändern.

 

Die Gesetzesvorlage sieht im Wesentlichen die folgenden Regelungen vor:

 

  • Die Anwendbarkeit des neuen Gesetzes soll sich auf Verträge beschränken, die nach Einführung des Gesetzes geschlossen wurden;

 

  • Der Begriff “Dritter” soll grundsätzlich jede Person umfassen, die nicht selbst Vertragspartei ist. Rechte sollen Dritte aus einem Vertrag jedoch nur dann her-leiten können, wenn sie in diesem na-mentlich genannt werden, Mitglied einer dort genannten Gruppe sind oder einer bestimmten Beschreibung entsprechen;

 

  • Die zwangsweise Durchsetzung von Drittrechten soll nur dann möglich sein, wenn dies in dem Vertrag ausdrücklich vorgesehen ist oder dem Vertrag zu entnehmen ist, dass die Begünstigung einer dritten Partei beabsichtigt ist;

 

  • Dem Drittbegünstigten sollen die sel-ben Rechtsmittel zur Verfügung stehen, die ihm zustünden, wenn er Partei des Vertrags wäre;

 

  • Es soll möglich sein, die Anwendbarkeit der neuen Regelungen durch Parteiver-einbarung auszuschließen.

 

Grundsätzlich findet das Gesetz keine An-wendung auf Arbeitsverträge, soweit eine Regelung zulasten des Arbeitnehmers durchgesetzt werden soll. Demzufolge kön-nen keine anderen Personen als der Arbeit-geber selbst arbeitsvertragliche Ansprüche gegenüber dem Arbeitnehmer durchsetzen.

 

Andersherum ist es hingegen durchaus mög-lich, dass eine dritte Person einen arbeitsver-traglichen Anspruch gegenüber dem Arbeit-geber geltend macht. Trifft den Arbeitgeber ausweislich des Arbeitsvertrags etwa die Pflicht, nicht nur den Arbeitnehmer sondern auch dessen Ehegatten und Kinder kranken-zuversichern, können auch letztere ihre

 

Rechte gegenüber den Arbeitgeber selbst-ständig durchsetzen.

 

  1. IP-Recht in Hong Kong und China: Chinas digitaler Vor-sprung
  2. a) China

 

Die Volksrepublik China verstärkt ihr Be-mühungen, die Inhaber von geistigen Eigen-tumsrechten („Intellectual Property” – “IP”) zu schützen. Die oberste Zollbehörde (“Ge-neral A dministration of Customs” – “GAC”) hat ein neues Online-System zum Erfassen von Schutzrechten eingeführt, das die Rechteinhaber in die Lage versetzen soll, ih-re Rechte papierlos registrieren zu lassen und bereits registrierte Rechte zu aktualisie-ren. Das neue papierlose System soll nicht nur die Treffsicherheit und Zuverlässigkeit sondern auch die Effektivität des Schutzes geistiger Eigentumsrechte verbessern.

 

Entdeckt die GAC Waren, die unter dem Verdacht stehen, fremde Schutzrechte zu verletzen, werden diese zurückgehalten und der registrierte Schutzrechtsinhaber wird kontaktiert, um eine Verletzung seiner Rech-te abzuklären. Will der Rechteinhaber im Rahmen eines formalen Rechtsbehelfs gegen die Verletzung seiner Schutzrechte vorge-hen, muss er für die Deckung der Kosten im Fall einer unberechtigten Beschlagnahme der Waren bürgen und entsprechend Sicherheit hinterlegen. Erforderlich ist zudem eine An-tragsschrift, der relevanten Beweise beizufü-gen sind. Üblicherweise entscheidet die GAC binnen 30 Tagen nach der Beschlag-nahe der Waren, ob tatsächlich eine Schutz-rechtsverletzung vorliegt.

 

  1. b) Hongkong

 

Im Unterschied zu China, verfügt Hongkong nicht über ein solches Online-System. Um eine Untersuchung einer möglichen Schutzrechtsverletzung durch die Zollbehörde einzuleiten, ist es notwendig, dass der Rechteinhaber Beweise vorlegt

 

(i), die eine Schutzrechtsverletzung belegen; und dass

(ii) die vermeintlich verletzten Waren in Hong Kong urheber- oder markenrechtli-chen Schutz genießen.

 

Falls der Rechteinhaber Kenntnis von einer Schutzrechtsverletzung erlangt, kann er den Zoll hierüber im Rahmen einer formalen Anzeige informieren. Das System setzt je-doch voraus, dass der Rechteinhaber von sich aus Kenntnis von einer möglichen Ver-letzung erlangt, was im Regelfall eine un-überwindbare Hürde darstellen dürfte.

 

  1. China
  2. Arbeitsrecht: Regelungen bezüglich Leiharbeit in Kraft

In einem Schritt in Richtung strengerer Vor-schriften bezüglich Leiharbeitsvereinbarun-gen hat das chinesische Ministerium für Per-sonal und Soziale Sicherheit (Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security) vor-läufige Bestimmungen bezüglich Leiharbeit („Tentative Provisions on Labour Dispatch“ – “TPLD”) bekanntgegeben, die am 01. März 2014 in Kraft traten. Die TPLD sollen das Arbeitsrecht der Volksrepublik China ergänzen.

 

Die folgende Zusammenfassung soll einen Überblick über die neuen Regelungen geben:

 

  1. a) Anwendungsbereich

 

Die TPLD betreffen in erster Linie körper-schaftlich organisierte Arbeitgeber, die be-rechtigt sind, Arbeitnehmer unter ihrer Ge-sellschaft zu beschäftigen, finden jedoch auch Anwendung auf partnerschaftlich or-ganisierte Arbeitgeber, wie Buchhaltungsbü-ros oder Rechtsanwaltskanzleien.

 

  • Regelungsgehalt

 

  • Die TPLD legt fest, dass Leiharbeiter nur zur kurzfristigen Aushilfe eingesetzt werden dürfen und auf Positionen die lediglich vorübergehend und unter-stützend zu besetzen sind. Die Anzahl

 

an Leiharbeitern darf 10% der Gesamtzahl der Angestellten eines Arbeitgebers nicht überschreiten.

 

  1. Falls der Anteil an Leiharbeitern 10% der Gesamtzahl aller Angestellten eines Arbeitgebers überschreitet, ist dieser verpflichtet, einen Plan zu erstellen, aus dem hervorgeht, durch welche Maß-nahmen die Anzahl der Leiharbeiter in-nerhalb von zwei Jahren ab dem Datum des Inkrafttreten des Gesetzes (also bis zum 01. März 2016) auf das zulässige Maß abgesenkt werden soll. Der Plan muss bei der lokal zuständigen Behörde eingereicht und dort registriert werden. Keine Anwendung findet die Regelung auf Arbeitsverträge und Leiharbeitsver-träge, die geschlossen wurden bevor das Arbeitsvertragsrecht Chinas bezüglich Leiharbeitsverträgen zum 28. Dezember 2012 angepasst wurde.

 

  1. Ausdrücklich von den genannten Rege-lungen ausgenommen sind chinesische Repräsentanzen ausländischer Unter-nehmen oder Finanzinstitute.

 

  1. Leiharbeitsfirmen ist es lediglich gestat-tet, eine einmalige Probezeit mit einem Leiharbeiter zu vereinbaren. Wenn die Leiharbeitsfirma einen Arbeitnehmer an einen zweiten Arbeitgeber entleiht, kann dieser folglich keine Probezeit mehr vereinbaren.
  2. Wenn ein Arbeitgeber einen Leiharbei-ter nicht weiter beschäftigen will, kann er den Vertrag unter denselben Voraus-setzungen beenden, wie sie das chinesi-sche Arbeitsvertragsrecht für die Been-digung eines Arbeitsvertrags festlegt. Der Arbeitgeber muss demnach eine Gleichbehandlung von Leiharbeitern und Festangestellten sicherstellen.

 

  1. Um eine Umgehung der Vorschriften der TPDL zu verhindern, finden die Vorschriften auch in solchen Fällen Anwendung, in denen Leiharbeit als selbstständige oder aus dem Betriebsab-lauf ausgelagerte Tätigkeit getarnt wird.

 

 

  • In Kürze: Anforderungen an grenzüberschreitende Garantien und Sicherheiten abgesenkt

Die Staatsverwaltung für Devisen der Volksrepublik China (“S tate Administration of Foreign Exchange” – “SAFE”) hat Vor-schriften über die Devisenverwaltung bezüg-lich grenzüberschreitender Garantien und Sicherheiten veröffentlicht. In Verbindung mit den Vorschriften wurden zudem weitere Richtlinien veröffentlicht.

 

Die Vorschriften und Richtlinien sind am 01. Juni 2014 in Kraft getreten und belegen die Bemühungen der chinesischen Regierung, die Kontrolle von Devisen zu liberalisieren. Durch die neuen Vorschriften werden die Genehmigungsverfahren für alle Arten grenzüberschreitender Garantien und Sicherheiten sowie die entsprechenden Geldflüsse gelockert und beschleunigt.

 

VII.   Südostasien

  • Myanmar

Up-Date: Banklizenzen werden ausge-geben

Wie in unserem letzten Newsletter im Mai dieses Jahres berichtet (zum Öffnen bitte hier klicken), unternimmt Myanmar Schritte in Richtung eines liberaleren Bankensystems.

 

Bislang waren ausländische Banken lediglich dazu berechtigt, Repräsentanzbüros zu öffnen und Marketing- und Akquise-Maßnahmen zu ergreifen. Dies soll sich in naher Zukunft ändern: Die Central Bank of Myanmar hat ausgewählte internationale Banken eingeladen, sich um bis zu zehn Banklizenzen zu bewerben, die zukünftig ausgegeben werden sollen. Die Banklizenzen würden es den Banken gestatten, Niederlassungen in Myanmar zu eröffnen und bislang beschränkte Dienstleistungen, wie die Darlehensvergabe an ausländische Firmen, genauso wie an inländische Banken anzubieten.

 

 

  • Vietnam

Gesetzlicher Rahmen für “notorisch be-kannte Marken”

Für eine beträchtliche Zeit war es nicht möglich, eine „bekannte Marke” in Vietnam anerkennen zu lassen. Erst im Februar 2001 wurde eine “bekannte Marke” als Marke definiert, “die fortlaufend für Waren/Dienstleistungen mit einem guten Ruf genutzt wird, wodurch die Marke weitreichende Bekanntheit erlangt“ (Decree 06/2001/ND-CP). Das heutige Gesetz über das geistige Eigentum weicht von dieser Definition geringfügig ab und definiert eine “bekannten Marke” als “eine Marke, die Verbrauchern in ganz Vietnam weithin bekannt ist“.

 

Trotz der gesetzlichen Bestimmung sind die praktischen Hindernisse vielfältig, was durch den Umstand verdeutlicht wird, dass die Zahl “bekannter Marken” nicht signifikant angestiegen ist. Einige dieser Schwierigkeiten sind:

 

  • Das Staatliche Amt für Geistiges Eigen-tum in Vietnam (“National Office of Intellectual Property of Vietnam” – “NOIP”) legt zunehmend strengere Maßstäbe für die Anerkennung „bekannter Marken“ an. Selbst Marken, die weltweit bekannt sind, wird die Anerkennung als „bekannte Marke“ im Fall unzureichender Nutzungsintensität und -dauer in Vietam verwehrt. Darüber hinaus stellt die NOIP hohe formale Anforderungen an das vorzulegende Beweismaterial.

 

  • Selbst wenn die NOIP Marken als bekannt anerkennt, tut sie dies in einigen Fällen nur für bestimmte Waren und/oder Dienstleistungen.

 

  • Ein weiterer Aspekt ist die fehlende Ef-fektivität des Systems. So verlangt das vietnamesische Gesetz über das Geisti-ge Eigentum, dass eine Liste aller „bekannter Marken“ durch das NOIP geführt und gepflegt wird. Da dieser

 

 

Anforderung bislang jedoch nicht entsprochen wurde, müssen die Inhaber „bekannter Marken“ die Bekanntheit ihrer Marken in jedem einzelnen Fall erneut beweisen.

 

Zusammenfassend wären eine einheitliche Entscheidungspraxis und ein transparenterer Anerkennungsprozess in Hinblick auf “bekannte Marken” willkommene Schritte in die richtige Richtung.

 

VIII. Europa

  • Deutschland

Steuerrecht: Steuerrechtliche Behand-lung des Erwerbs eigener Anteile

Das deutsche Finanzministerium hat zu den steuerrechtlichen Konsequenzen von An-teilsrückkäufen im Rahmen eines Rund-schreibens Stellung genommen, das Antwor-ten auf einige Fragen gibt, die aufgrund des Bilanzrechtsmodernisierungsgesetzes, das festsetzt, dass Aktienrückkäufe bilanzrecht-lich als Kapitalherabsetzung zu behandeln, sind, aufgekommen waren.

 

Ausweislich des Rundschreibens hat die bi-lanzrechtliche Einordnung die folgenden steuerrechtlichen Auswirkungen:

 

  • Auf Ebene der Gesellschaft werden Kosten für Anteilsrückkäufe als Aus-gaben berücksichtigt.

 

  • Auf Ebene der Anteilseigner stellt sich der Verkauf solcher Anteile als Veräußerungsgeschäft dar, das nach den allgemeinen Grundsätzen der Besteuerung unterliegt.

 

  • Werden die Anteile zu einem überhöh-ten Kaufpreis erworben, die Anteileig-ner durch den Verkauf also bevorteilt, kann dies als verdeckte Ge-winnausschüttung zu behandeln sein. Ein überhöhter Kaufpreis ist in der Re-gel nicht anzunehmen, wenn die Anteile über die Börse oder im Tender-Verfahren veräußert werden.

 

Gesellschaftsrecht: “Russian-Roulette-

Klauseln”

 

In einem Rechtsstreit vor dem Oberlandesgericht Nürnberg, hatte sich das Gericht mit einer sogenannten “Russian-Roulette-Klausel” (auch „chinesische Klausel“ genannt) zu befassen.

 

Derartige Klauseln werden in Gesellschafts-verträge von zweigliedrigen Personen- oder Kapitalgesellschaften aufgenommen, wenn die Gesellschafter jeweils 50 % der Stimm-rechte halten und es dadurch zu einer Pattsi-tuation kommen kann. Letzteres soll durch die besagten Klauseln durch folgende Rege-lung verhindert werden: Eine Partei kann der anderen Partei ihre Anteile zu einem be-stimmten Kaufpreis anbieten. Der Ange-botsempfänger kann dann wählen, ob er das Angebot annimmt und die Anteile kauft oder das Angebot ablehnt und stattdessen seine Anteile zu demselben Kaufpreis an die anbietende Partei verkauft.

 

Das Gericht hat entschieden, das solche Klauseln nicht per se unwirksam sind. Unter Verweis auf Entscheidungen des Oberlan-desgericht Wien und des französischen Berufungsgericht vertrat das Oberlan-desgericht Nürnberg die Ansicht, dass „Rus-sian-Roulette-Klauseln“ ein System gegen-seitiger Kontrolle beinhalten und nicht ge-gen die guten Sitten verstoßen, wenn

 

  • die Klausel selbst oder ihre Anwendung nicht eine Partei übermäßig begünstigt;

 

  • es der anderen Partei nicht an einer tat-sächlichen Entscheidungsfreiheit fehlt;

 

  • die erste Partei keine Vorteile aus einer solchen fehlenden Entscheidungsfrei-heit gezogen hat.

 

In anderen Fällen kann es hingegen durch-aus zum Missbrauch solcher Klauseln kom-men, etwa wenn die anbietende Partei über eine erheblich höhere finanzielle Leistungs-fähigkeit verfügt und ein Angebot zu einem strategisch kalkulierten Kaufpreis unterbrei-tet oder wenn der anbietenden Partei be-kannt ist, dass der Anteilserwerb für den

 

Angebotsempfänger aus strategischen oder steuerlichen Gründen nicht praktikabel ist. In solchen Fällen muss das Verhalten auf ei-nen Verstoß gegen die guten Sitten über-prüft werden.

 

  • Österreich

IP-Recht: Programmlogik als Ge-brauchsmuster

Der Oberste Patent- und Markensenat hatte zu entscheiden, ob es möglich ist Pro-grammlogik nach dem österreichischen Ge-brauchsmustergesetz zu schützen.

 

  1. a) Der Fall

 

Der Kläger hatte das Österreichische Pa-tentamt um Schutz für Programmlogik er-sucht, die in der Lage ist gewöhnliche Diffe-renzialgleichungen zu lösen. Die Technische Abteilung des Österreichischen Patentamts, die über die Anmeldung in erster Instanz zu entscheiden hatte, wies diese wegen man-gelnder Technizität der Programmlogik zu-rück.

 

  1. b) Die Entscheidung des Senats

 

Nachdem die Beschwerde, die der Anmelder gegen diese Entscheidung bei der Rechtsmit-telabteilung des Österreichischen Patentamts eingelegt hatte, zurückgewiesen wurde, legte der Anmelder Beschwerde beim Obersten Patent- und Markensenat ein.

 

Der Senat hielt die Entscheidungen der ers-ten beiden Instanzen aufrecht. Er bezog sich auf die Begründungen der ersten beiden Entscheidungen und führte aus, dass Pro-grammlogik, auf der Programme für Daten-verarbeitungsanlagen basieren, eine Erfin-dung im Sinne von § 1 Abs. 2 Gebrauchs-mustergesetz darstellt und somit grundsätz-lich als Gebrauchsmuster registriert werden kann, während Programme für Datenverar-beitungsanlagen als solche hingegen keine Erfindungen im Sinne von § 1 Abs. 2 Ge-brauchsmustergesetz dar stellen (vgl. § 1 Abs. 3 Nr. 3 Gebrauchsmustergesetz). Als kritischer Punkt wurde vom Senat jedoch

 

das Fehlen der Lösung eines technischen Problems angesehen. Programme für Datenverarbeitungsanlagen sind im Wesent-lichen lediglich Befehlsanweisungen die kei-ne technischen Informationen oder Lösun-gen technischer Probleme enthalten. Daher kann nicht jede Programmlogik als Ge-schmacksmuster registriert werden, sondern nur solche, die ein technisches Problem mit technischen Mitteln löst.

 

  1. c) Folgen

 

Die Entscheidung legt dar, dass § 1 Abs. 2 Geschmacksmustergesetz, der Programmlo-gik explizit als schutzfähige Erfindung be-zeichnet, im Zusammenhang mit § 1 Abs. 1 Gebrauchsmustergesetz zu verstehen ist, der festlegt, dass Erfindungen

 

  • neu (dem aktuellen Stand der Technik voraus) sein,

 

  • auf einem erfinderischen Schritt beru-hen, und

 

  • gewerblich anwendbar

 

sein müssen.

 

  • Schweiz

Schweizerische Verjährungsfrist im Kon-flikt mit der Europäischen Menschen-rechtskonvention

Das Europäische Gericht für Menschen-rechte (“EGMR”) hat eine bemerkenswerte Entscheidung über die Anwendbarkeit ge-setzlicher Verjährungsfristen des schweizeri-schen Rechts auf einen Fall von Asbestkon-tamination gefällt. Das EGMR stellte klar, dass die Anwendung dieser Vorschriften im vorliegenden Fall eine Verletzung der Euro-päischen Menschenrechtskonvention dar-stellt („Konvention‘‘).

 

  1. a) Der Sachverhalt

 

Ein Arbeitnehmer, der von 1964 bis zu sei-nem Tod im Jahr 2005 für eine schweizer Maschinenfabrik gearbeitet hatte, war dort von 1965 bis jedenfalls 1978 Asbest ausgesetzt, ohne die möglichen Folgen einer solchen Belastung zu kennen. Im Jahr 2004 wurde bei ihm eine bösartige Tumorerkran-kung des Rippenfells diagnostiziert an der er im Jahr 2005 verstarb. Seine Töchter ver-folgten als seine Erben eine Klage auf Zah-lung von Schadensersatz und Schmerzens-geld weiter, die der Mann im Jahr 2004 ge-gen seinen Arbeitgeber erhoben hatte. In ei-nem Parallelverfahren klagte die Witwe des Verstorbenen gegen die Schweizer Unfall-versicherung auf Zahlung von Schmerzens-geld. Beide Klagen wurden durch sämtliche Instanzen mit der Begründung zurückgewie-sen, dass die absolute Verjährungsfrist von zehn Jahren, die kenntnisunabhängig mit der Entstehung des Klagegrundes zu laufen be-ginnt, abgelaufen sei. Das EGMR sah dies anders und urteilte, dass die Entscheidungen Art. 6 der Konvention verletzen.

 

  1. b) Die Entscheidungsgründe

 

Ein faires Verfahren, wie es von Art. 6 der Konvention garantiert wird, muss im Lichte des Rechtsstaatsprinzips ausgelegt werden. Als einem Aspekt des Rechtsstaatsprinzips muss dem Gebot effektiven Rechtsschutzes Rechnung getragen werden, wonach jedem ein effektiver Rechtsbehelf zur Durchset-zung seiner Ansprüche zur Verfügung ste-

 

hen muss. Das EGMR vertrat die Auffas-sung, dass das Recht auf effektiven Rechts-schutz zwar keine absolute Geltung bean-sprucht, sondern vielmehr Gegenstand von Beschränkungen ist, weil es seiner Natur nach eine staatliche Regulierung voraussetzt. Diese Regulierung darf den Zugang zu den Gerichten jedoch nicht in einer Art oder ei-nem Ausmaß einschränken, dass der We-sensgehalt des Rechts beeinträchtigt wird.

 

  • Die Auswirkungen der Entschei-dung

 

Der schweizer Gesetzgeber bereitet bereits eine Gesetzesänderung vor, die die derzeitige Rechtslage dahingehend modifizieren soll, dass die absolute Verjäh-rungsfrist für Ansprüche aufgrund von Per-sonenschäden von 10 auf 30 Jahre verlängert wird, wobei die Verjährungsfrist mit dem Tag zu laufen beginnen soll, an dem das schädigende Ereignis endet. Dies soll auch für Fälle gelten, in denen der An-spruchsinhaber zu diesem Zeitpunkt noch keine Kenntnis von dem Schaden hat.

 

 

error: Sorry, this information cannot be copied / printed. If you would like to received the text as pdf, please send us an e-mail.