BOI Promotion:

 

International Trading Centre (ITC)

 

 

 

February 2016

 

 

A l l r i g ht s r e s e r v e d © L o r e n z & P a r t ne r s  2 0 1 6

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information pro-vided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, in-cluding any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated de-liberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

  1. Introduction

 

An International Trading Centre (“ITC”) is a company registered in Thailand perform-ing international trade business (purchase and sale of goods, materials or parts) or pro-viding services to overseas customers.

 

This newsletter outlines the qualifying crite-ria and tax privileges granted to ITCs by the Revenue Department and the Board of In-vestment (“BOI”).1

 

  1. Qualifying Criteria

 

In order to qualify for the BOI (non-tax) promotion, an ITC must fulfil the following requirements:

 

  • Registered and fully paid-up capital of at least THB 10 million; and

 

  • Provision of services relating to in-ternational trade that meet the crite-ria set for the promotion of ITC, i.e.:

 

o The supply of goods; o Packaging;

 

o Transporting; o Insurance;

 

  • Consulting and providing tech-nical services and product train-ing (only admissible if related to the products sold – no isolated services);

 

  • Other services as determined by the Director General of the Revenue Department (not speci-fied at this stage).

 

 

 

  • This promotion was approved by the Thai Cabinet on 23 December 2014, and the detailed conditions were announced by Royal Decree No. 587 on 28 April 2015 and came into effect on 1 May 2015.

 

The BOI promotion for ITCs does not cover local retail trading activities. There-fore, local retail trading is not eligible for the below mentioned incentives. If both in-ternational and local trading shall be per-formed, a Foreign Business License may be required for the local retail trading part (if the company is majoritarian foreign-owned). The BOI promotion provides non-tax benefits such as:

 

  • 100 % foreign ownership;

 

  • Land ownership;

 

  • Exemption of import duty on ma-chinery;

 

  • Eased requirements for hiring of ex-patriates.

 

  • Tax Privileges

 

An ITC that – in addition to the aforemen-tioned criteria (II.) – has annual local ex-penses (excluding cost of sales ) of at least THB 15 million will be granted the following tax privileges:

 

  • Exemption from corporate income tax (“CIT”) on profit earned or re-ceived abroad, including sales, pro-curement and services (“out-out”);

 

  • Exemption from withholding tax on dividends paid to its corporate shareholders abroad who are not carrying on business in Thailand (provided such dividends are paid out of the ITC’s net profits or CIT exempt income); and

 

  • Reduced personal income tax of 15% flat for expatriates who work full-time for the ITC for at least 180 days in each tax year.

 

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

When calculating CIT, the ITC has to sepa-rate non-qualified income from qualified in-come and its related expenses. If the ex-penses cannot be separated, the ITC must apportion non-qualified and qualified ex-penses by the ratio of the received income. However, if such method of apportion does not reflect the reality of business, the ITC may request approval of the Director-General of the Revenue Department to use other, more accurate and realistic ways of calculation.

 

In case the ITC does not meet the qualifying criteria in any given accounting period, the incentives will not be granted for that ac-counting year only, i.e. incentives are not be-ing cancelled retroactively.

 

  1. Approval Process

 

In order to obtain the tax benefits men-tioned above, an approval needs to be ob-tained from the Director-General of the Revenue Department.

 

 

 

Existing International Procurement Offices

(“IPO”) can upgrade their status to ITC.

 

  1. Conclusion

 

Thailand is competing with neighboring countries for foreign investors who are seek-ing to establish their trading hub in South-east Asia. Countries like Singapore or Hong Kong use the so-called “Territorial Tax Sys-tem” which levies CIT only on income sourced within the country. Thailand, on the other hand, uses the so-called “Residential Tax System” which means that companies that are registered in Thailand have to pay CIT on their worldwide profits. By granting tax incentives to ITCs – and thereby de fac-to granting an exemption from the Residen-tial Tax System – Thailand is trying to attract more foreign investment. The straightfor-ward provisions are expected to attract more foreign investors who may consider Thai-land as an attractive country to set up their international operations hub.

 

 

 

 

Newsletter No. 205 (EN)

 

 

 

BOI Promotion:

 

International Trading Centre (ITC)

 

 

 

February 2016

 

 

A l l r i g ht s r e s e r v e d © L o r e n z & P a r t ne r s  2 0 1 6

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information pro-vided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, in-cluding any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated de-liberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

  1. Introduction

 

An International Trading Centre (“ITC”) is a company registered in Thailand perform-ing international trade business (purchase and sale of goods, materials or parts) or pro-viding services to overseas customers.

 

This newsletter outlines the qualifying crite-ria and tax privileges granted to ITCs by the Revenue Department and the Board of In-vestment (“BOI”).1

 

  1. Qualifying Criteria

 

In order to qualify for the BOI (non-tax) promotion, an ITC must fulfil the following requirements:

 

  • Registered and fully paid-up capital of at least THB 10 million; and

 

  • Provision of services relating to in-ternational trade that meet the crite-ria set for the promotion of ITC, i.e.:

 

o The supply of goods; o Packaging;

 

o Transporting; o Insurance;

 

  • Consulting and providing tech-nical services and product train-ing (only admissible if related to the products sold – no isolated services);

 

  • Other services as determined by the Director General of the Revenue Department (not speci-fied at this stage).

 

 

 

  • This promotion was approved by the Thai Cabinet on 23 December 2014, and the detailed conditions were announced by Royal Decree No. 587 on 28 April 2015 and came into effect on 1 May 2015.

 

The BOI promotion for ITCs does not cover local retail trading activities. There-fore, local retail trading is not eligible for the below mentioned incentives. If both in-ternational and local trading shall be per-formed, a Foreign Business License may be required for the local retail trading part (if the company is majoritarian foreign-owned). The BOI promotion provides non-tax benefits such as:

 

  • 100 % foreign ownership;

 

  • Land ownership;

 

  • Exemption of import duty on ma-chinery;

 

  • Eased requirements for hiring of ex-patriates.

 

  • Tax Privileges

 

An ITC that – in addition to the aforemen-tioned criteria (II.) – has annual local ex-penses (excluding cost of sales ) of at least THB 15 million will be granted the following tax privileges:

 

  • Exemption from corporate income tax (“CIT”) on profit earned or re-ceived abroad, including sales, pro-curement and services (“out-out”);

 

  • Exemption from withholding tax on dividends paid to its corporate shareholders abroad who are not carrying on business in Thailand (provided such dividends are paid out of the ITC’s net profits or CIT exempt income); and

 

  • Reduced personal income tax of 15% flat for expatriates who work full-time for the ITC for at least 180 days in each tax year.

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

When calculating CIT, the ITC has to sepa-rate non-qualified income from qualified in-come and its related expenses. If the ex-penses cannot be separated, the ITC must apportion non-qualified and qualified ex-penses by the ratio of the received income. However, if such method of apportion does not reflect the reality of business, the ITC may request approval of the Director-General of the Revenue Department to use other, more accurate and realistic ways of calculation.

 

In case the ITC does not meet the qualifying criteria in any given accounting period, the incentives will not be granted for that ac-counting year only, i.e. incentives are not be-ing cancelled retroactively.

 

  1. Approval Process

 

In order to obtain the tax benefits men-tioned above, an approval needs to be ob-tained from the Director-General of the Revenue Department.

 

 

 

Existing International Procurement Offices

(“IPO”) can upgrade their status to ITC.

 

  1. Conclusion

 

Thailand is competing with neighboring countries for foreign investors who are seek-ing to establish their trading hub in South-east Asia. Countries like Singapore or Hong Kong use the so-called “Territorial Tax Sys-tem” which levies CIT only on income sourced within the country. Thailand, on the other hand, uses the so-called “Residential Tax System” which means that companies that are registered in Thailand have to pay CIT on their worldwide profits. By granting tax incentives to ITCs – and thereby de fac-to granting an exemption from the Residen-tial Tax System – Thailand is trying to attract more foreign investment. The straightfor-ward provisions are expected to attract more foreign investors who may consider Thai-land as an attractive country to set up their international operations hub.

 

 

Newsletter No. 206 (EN)

 

 

 

BOI Promotion:

 

Cluster and Super Cluster

 

 

 

March 2016

 

 

A l l r i g ht s r e s e r v e d © L o r e n z & P a r t ne r s  2 0 1 6

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information pro-vided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, in-cluding any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated de-liberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

  1. Introduction

 

The Thai Board of Investment (“BOI”) is a governmental agency under the direct admini-stration of the Prime Minister’s office to pro-mote investment in Thailand. It provides gen-eral investment information and services and offers certain promotions to both Thai and foreign investors. The BOI is well established and very active in this field. In 2015, 2,237 pro-jects received BOI promotion, 1,151 of which were foreign investments (more than ten per-cent foreign capital). The total value of foreign investment was THB 348.5 billion (approx. EUR 8.77 billion).

 

The BOI generally grants activity-based incen-tives which include

 

new investors, and to decentralize developments, as well as create opportunities for SMEs[…]”.1

 

  1. Eligible Activities and Incentives

 

The BOI grants its cluster promotion only to specific industries, for example:

 

  • Automotive & Parts
  • Electrical Appliances

 

  • Textile and Garment Industry
  • Electronics and Telecommunication Equipment

 

  • Digital Economy

 

  • Petrochemical and Eco-Friendly Chemical Products

 

  • Agro-processing Industry

 

 

  • tax incentives (corporate income tax exemption for up to 8 years, exemp-tion from import duty on machinery and raw materials) and

 

  • non-tax incentives (possibility for for-eigners to own 100% of the company and to own land, easier obtaining of visas and work permits for expats).

 

In addition to these incentives under the “gen-eral” promotion system, the recently an-nounced cluster promotion grants reduced corporate income tax (50% of the normal rate) for 5 years on top of the tax exempt period under the general BOI promotion, as well as 8 years corporate income tax exemption for “su-per cluster” projects (not on top, i.e. the tax exempt period is maximum 8 years).

 

The intention of the new cluster promotion is

 

“[…]to strengthen the value chain and to consequently create future industries, to enhance investment competen-cies to attract value added investment from existing and

 

The BOI grants the following cluster incen-tives to eligible projects:

 

0% CIT
for 8 years
(only super cluster)
(capped at the maxi-
mum investment ½ CIT rate
amount, not includ- for 5 additional
ing cost of land and years
working capital,
unless CIT exemp-
tion without cap is al-
ready granted under
general BOI promo-
tion)

 

 

 

 

1 BOI Announcement No. 10/2558 “Cluster Investment

Promotion Incentives and Privileges on the Special Eco-nomic Development Zones”, available at http://www.boi.go.th/upload/content/BOI%20Annou ncemen10_2558_final_31681.pdf.

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

Eligible projects must apply for investment promotion within 30 December 2016 and start generating revenue within 31 Decem-ber 2017 (unless extension is granted by the BOI on a case-by-case basis).

 

Another condition is to have cooperation with academic institutions, research insti-tutes or Centers of Excellence in the Special Economic Development Zones.

 

 

 

III. Promoted Projects

 

  1. Super Cluster

 

In order to be eligible for “super cluster” promotion, projects must be located in spe-cific provinces designated as Special Eco-nomic Development Zones, depending on the type of industry.

 

Amongst others, the following activities fall under the “super cluster” promotion:

 

 

Special Economic Super Cluster General
No.2 Activity
Development Zone Promotion BOI Promotion
Manufacture of
4.7 automobile en- 3-5 years*
gines
4.8 Manufacture of 8 years*
vehicle parts
4.12 Manufacture of Ayutthaya, Pathum 5 years *
motorcycles Thani, Chonburi,
Manufacture of Rayong, Chacheong-
5.1.1 advanced tech- sao, Prachinburi, Nak- 5 years*
nology electrical hon Ratchasima
8 years CIT ex-
products
emption*
Manufacture of
+
5.5 material for mi- 5-8 years*
5 years reduced
croelectronics
CIT rate (50% of
5.6 Electronics design 8 years (no cap)
normal rate)
5.7 Software Chiang Mai, Phuket 0-8 years (no cap)
Manufacture of
eco-friendly
chemicals or
6.2 polymers or Chonburi, Rayong 5-8 years*
products from
eco-friendly
polymers
7.9.2.2 Software parks Chiang Mai, Phuket 8 years (no cap)
7.10 Cloud service 8 years (no cap)
* CIT exemption
(non-exhaustive list) capped at the
amount of total in-
vestment.
2 Numbering in accordance with the List of Activities
Eligible for Investment Promotion, stipulated in BOI
Announcement No. 2/2557 “Policies and Criteria for
Investment Promotion”, available at
http://www.boi.go.th/upload/content/newpolicy-
announcement%20as%20of%2020_3_58_23499.pdf.

 

 

  1. Target Cluster

 

Amongst others, the following projects in the agro-processing and textile/garment in-dustry are eligible for “target cluster” pro-motion:

 

 

No.3 Special Economic Cluster Devel- General
Activity opment
Development Zone BOI Promotion
Promotion
Public utilities and
basic services
(container yards,
7.1 loadg- 5-8 years*
ing/unloading fa-
cilities for cargo
ship, commercial additional
airports)
5 years reduced
7.3.1 Rail transport sys- Any of the above 8 years*
CIT rate (50% of
tems
normal rate)
International dis-
7.4.2 tribution centers 5 years*
(IDC)
7.11 Research and de- 8 years*
velopment
7.19 Vocational training 8 years*
centers
*CIT exemption
(non-exhaustive list) capped at the
amount of total in-
vestment.

 

 

3 Numbering in accordance with the List of Activities Eligible for Investment Promotion, stipulated in BOI

Announcement No. 2/2557 “Policies and Criteria for

 

Investment Promotion”.

 

 

  1. Cluster Development

 

In addition to the above, the following infra-structure projects supporting cluster devel-opment are also eligible for investment promotion:

 

No.4 Activity Special Economic Target Cluster General
Development Zone Promotion BOI Promotion
Manufacture of Chiang Mai, Chiang
1.18 medical food or 8 years*
Rai, Lampang, Lam-
food supplements
phun, Khon Kaen,
Trading centers
Nakhon Ratchasima,
1.20 for agricultural 5 years*
Chaiyaphum,
goods
Kanchanaburi,
Plant or animal
1.2 Ratchaburi, Petchaburi, 8 years*
breeding
Prachuab Khiri Khan,
Grading, packag-
Rayong, Chanthaburi,
ing and storage of
1.8 Trat, Chumphon, Surat 5-8 years*
plants, vegetables,
Thani, Krabi, Songkhla additional
fruits or flowers
5 years reduced
Manufacture of Kanchanaburi, Rayong,
1.14.2 CIT rate (50% of 8 years*
rubber products Songkhla
normal rate)
Kanchanaburi, Nakhon
Manufacture of Pathom, Ratchaburi,
Samut Sakorn,
3.1 textile products or 0-8 years*
Chonburi,
parts
Chacheongsao,
Prachinburi, Sa Kaeo
Creative products
3.9 design and devel- Bangkok 8 years (no cap)
opment center
* CIT exemption
(non-exhaustive list) capped at the
amount of total in-
vestment.

 

 

4 Numbering in accordance with the List of Activities Eligible for Investment Promotion, stipulated in BOI

Announcement No. 2/2557 “Policies and Criteria for

 

Investment Promotion”.

 

 

III. Additional Incentives ploit  regional  potential  and  to  strengthen
value chains.

 

Furthermore, the Ministry of Finance is cur-rently considering granting the following ad-ditional incentives for industries with signifi-cant importance:

 

  • Extension of the corporate income tax exemption for 10 – 15 years;
  • Exemption of personal income tax for international specialists in specif-ic areas (both Thai and foreigners); and
  • Granting residence permits to lead-ing foreign experts.

 

However, these additional incentives are not yet officially announced.

 

  1. Summary

 

The BOI’s cluster promotion aims at creat-ing regional investment concentration to ex-

 

In combination with the new (general) in-vestment promotion strategy, this offers numerous investment opportunities for in-vestors. After 15 years of minimal changes, this policy is an appropriate adjustment within an overall positive development.

 

Since additional incentives were introduced by the BOI, it may be worth reviewing the current investment structure and considering new investments taking these new promo-tions into account.

 

In particular, projects eligible for cluster promotion should consider setting up in one of the respective Special Economic Devel-opment Zones in order to profit from the additional tax incentives granted under the cluster promotion.

 

 

 

Newsletter No. 207 (EN)

 

 

 

The Budget of Hong Kong 2016/2017

 

 

 

February 2016

 

 

A l l r i g ht s r e s e r v e d © L o r e n z & P a r t ne r s  2 0 1 6

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays greatest attention on updating the information provided in this newsletter we cannot take responsibility for the topicality, completeness or quality of the information provided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, including any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

  1. Introduction

 

The Financial Secretary of Hong Kong, John Tsang, held his annual budget report for the 2016/2017 budget year of Hong Kong on 24 February 2016.

 

Even though the economy slowed down in Hong Kong, mainly because of less visitors from Mainland China, the Hong Kong gov-ernment forecasts a surplus of HKD 30 bil-lion (approx. EUR 3.5 billion) at the end of the financial year (31 March 2016). This is lower than the anticipated HKD 36 billion (approx. EUR 4.2 billion) and much lower than the estimation of between HKD 72 bil-lion and HKD 90 billion (approx. EUR 8.4

 

– 10.5 billion) which were raised in the last weeks by several big audit firms.

 

  • The Highlights

 

  • Economic Performance 2015/2016

 

Due to the economic slowdown in Mainland China, Hong Kong suffered an economic setback as well. Export of goods and ser-vices, inbound tourism and retail sales de-creased. However, domestic demand and in-frastructure spending led to an overall Gross

 

Domestic Product (“GDP”) growth of 2.4 percent, the fourth consecutive year with a growth rate lower than the annual average of 3.4 percent over the past decade.

 

The unemployment rate averaged at a low level of 3.3 percent for the year as a whole, sustaining a state of full employment. The headline inflation rate was 3 percent.

 

The revised estimate for government reve-nue is HKD 457 billion (approx. EUR 53.5 billion) and, therefore, 4.2 percent (or HKD 20 billion) lower than originally estimated.

 

The fiscal reserves are estimated to be at HKD 860 billion (approx. EUR 95 billion) by the end of March 2016, equivalent to 24 months of government expenditure (the reserves are amongst the largest worldwide).

 

  1. Outlook for 2016/2017

 

As 2016 is starting unsteady, the forecast is rather cautious. Though the U.S. Federal Reserve increased the interest rate, the Eurozone and Japan have kept their poli-cies of quantitative easing. Additionally, emerging economies and Mainland China are still facing pressure.

 

Facing internal and external challenges, the Financial Secretary forecasts a GDP growth of 1 – 2 percent in 2016. The inflation is forecasted to fall to the level of 2.3 percent.

 

Taking this into account, the Financial Sec-retary forecasts a surplus of (only) HKD 11 billion (approx. EUR 1.3 billion) for the coming year 2016/2017.

 

Fiscal reserves are estimated to increase to HKD 870 billion (approx. EUR 102 billion) by the end of March 2017, representing 35.2 percent GDP or equivalent to 21 months of government expenditure.

 

  1. Relief Measures

 

As every year, the public expected the gov-ernment to announce several relief measures in order to ease the financial burden of the taxpayers. This year, the measures target es-pecially the tourism sector, small and me-dium-sized enterprises and the middle class:

 

  1. a) Helping SMEs

 

Small     and     medium-sized     enterprises

(“SMEs”)  employ  approx.  50  percent  of

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

the private sector workforce. The Financial Secretary will take the following measures to ease the tax burden on SMEs in Hong Kong.

 

  • Reducing the profits tax for 2015/2016 by 75 percent, subject to a ceiling of HKD 20,000 (approx. EUR 2,300) (actually max 15 per-cent).

 

  • Waiving the business registration fees for 2016/2017.

 

  • Starting a “Pilot Technology Voucher Programme” under the “Innovation and Technology Fund” to subsidies the use of technological services to improve and upgrade business processes. The subsidies are capped at HKD 200,000 (approx. EUR 23,500) for each eligble SME.

 

  • Supporting Tourism

 

Tourism contributes five percent to Hong Kong’s GDP. In light of decreasing num-bers of tourists (mostly due to less tourists from Mainland China, and the strong Hong Kong Dollar), the Financial Secretary wants to develop tourism towards diversified and quality-driven high value-added services to better accommodate high-spending over-night visitors. The measures include:

 

  • Waiving certain licence fees for travel agents, hotels, guesthouses and restaurants.

 

  • Expanding the scale of major events held in Hong Kong.

 

  • In the long run, projects such as Disneyland and other franchises will be promoted. Hong Kong will also start a pilot scheme regarding food trucks.

 

 

  1. c) Easing Financial Pressure

 

Mr. Tsang announced several measures to ease financial pressure and to stimulate local consumption and economic growth. The measures include reduced salaries tax and raised allowances. The measures are in de-tail:

 

  • Reducing the salaries tax by 75 per-cent, subject to a ceiling of HKD 20,000 (approx. EUR 2,300). Con-sidering the tax reduction, the effec-tive income tax rate is approx. 8 to 10 percent, depending on the tax-payers’ income. However, a major-ity of employees in Hong Kong do not have to pay salary tax at all.

 

  • Providing an extra tax deductible al-lowance to social security recipients, equal to one month of the standard rate Comprehensive Social Security Assistance payments, Old Age Al-lowance, Old Age Living Allowance and Disability Allowance.

 

  • Increasing the basic tax deductible allowance (minimizing the tax base) from HKD 120,000 to HKD 132,000 (approx. EUR 15,400).

 

  • Increasing the single tax dedutabal parent allowance from HKD 120,000 to HKD 132,000, and in-creasing the married person’s allow-ance from HKD 240,000 to HKD 264,000 (approx. EUR 30,800).

 

  • Increasing the tax deductible allow-ance for maintaining a dependent parent or grandparent aged 60 or above from HKD 40,000 to HKD 46,000 (approx. EUR 5,400).

 

  • Increasing the tax deductible allow-ance for maintaining a dependent parent or grandparent aged between

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

55 and 59 from HKD 20,000 to HKD 23,000 (approx. EUR 2,700).

 

  • Raising the deduction ceiling for elderly residential care expenses from HKD 80,000 to HKD 92,000 (approx. EUR 10,800) for taxpayers whose parents or grandparents are admitted to residential care homes.

 

  • New World Economy

 

To maintain competitiveness, Hong Kong will strengthen its profile regarding innova-tions and new markets with the following measures:

 

  • Innovation

 

  • Enhancing efforts in research and development.

 

  • Improving tools and means regard-ing financial technology (Fintech), including ease of business and en-suring consumer protection

 

  • Helping start-ups and entrepreneurs by providing a HKD 2 billion (approx. EUR 235 million Innova-tion and Technology Fund, expanding the Science Park to ac-commodate further offices and con-tinuing to support start-ups through the Corporate Venture Fund.

 

  • Boosting creative industries such as fashion and design, film and arts and sports.

 

  • Finding new Markets

 

  • Hong Kong will continue to support the efforts regarding the “Silk Road

Economic Belt and the 21st-century

 

Maritime Silk Road”. Hong Kong will hold the inaugural Belt and Road Summit in May 2016.

 

 

  • Hong Kong will continue expanding trading networks, namely pressing for a free trade agreement with the Association of Southeast Asian Na-tions (ASEAN). Hong Kong will also seek discussion with Macau re-garding a closer economic partner-ship.

 

  • Hong Kong will expand the airport to a three-runway system, providing capacities for 100 million passengers and 9 million tonnes of cargo by 2030.

 

  • Regarding Hong Kong’s relevance to

RMB trade settlement, the government continues exploring ways to open up more channels for two-way cross-border RMB fund flows, including increasing the investment quota.

 

  • The Financial Secretary will issue a new iBond of up to HKD 10 billion (approx. EUR 1,2 billion) with a ma-turity period of three years following the existing practice.

 

  • Situation and Intentions

 

The Financial Secretary emphasizes that ex-penditure growth needs to be contained, due to an aging population and a shrinking workforce.

 

Given the latest discussion of rising costs of infrastructure projects, the Financial Secre-tary will deepen the efforts of controlling costs by establishing a special office regu-larly reporting on figures and progress.

 

Mr. Tsang says he hopes the Mainland will further deepen liberalisation measures em-barked on this year with Guangdong and Hong Kong and extend them nationwide, thereby achieving basic liberalisation of trade in services between the entire Mainland and Hong Kong by the end of this year.

 

 

 

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

III.  Conclusion

 

For   the   first   time   in   recent   years,   Mr.

Tsang’s  estimates  matched  the reality.  Mr.

 

Tsang has a reputation for underestimating the surplus which was criticised as damaging to Hong Kong’s allocation of expenditures.

 

Hong Kong is still trying to reduce its expenditures, but most of the measures re-main unchanged. The 2016/2017 budget does not move away substantially from the line taken in recent years. Mr. Tsang propa-

 

 

gandized a conservative finance policy to be prepared for future challenges. As in previ-ous years, the main criticism on the budget is that it provides several short term relief measures that might help to support local consumption, but the tax basis remains very narrow. Many experts claim that Hong Kong needs a substantial overhaul of its tax system (including a discussion whether to in-troduce a sales tax, VAT) in order to be pre-pared for the estimated economic downturn of the coming years.

 

 

Newsletter No. 208 (EN)

 

 

 

 

Green Building

 

in Thailand

 

 

 

March 2016

 

 

 

A l l r i g ht s r e s e r v e d © L o r e n z & P a r t ne r s  2 0 1 6

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information pro-vided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, in-cluding any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated de-liberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

  • Introduction

 

The devastating effects of pollution and the protection of the environment become an increasingly important issue in Thailand. In 2011, the Thai government decided to sup-port environmental protection by promoting investments in “green” products and “eco-friendly” materials. In the course of this proc-ess, Thailand introduced the concept of “Green Building”. As it becomes increasingly important in public policy, there are more and more government incentives and subsi-dies promoting environmental-friendly buildings. This newsletter lays out the in-vestment possibilities in the “Green Building” industry in Thailand.

 

  1. “Green Building”

 

The term “Green Building” refers to environ-ment-friendly and eco-efficient planning, constructing and operating of buildings. These buildings have to meet certain criteria regarding their construction (materials) and operation, maintenance, renovation and demolition. The criteria refer to different elements and depend on what rating system is chosen to certify the building (see below). Regardless of the rating systems, the ele-ments relate to the use of renewable (local) building materials, the reduction of waste and energy (e. g. by using renewable energy) or the prevention of pollutants in the air (e. g. by using a green roof as a natural filter for pollutants).

 

Green Building” thereby contributes to

 

  • energy saving;

 

  • water efficiency;

 

  • reduction of waste;

 

  • reduction of carbon dioxide; and

 

  • thus, to pollution control.

 

Generally speaking, the construction costs exceed those of a standard building by approx. 10 to 15 percent. The subsequent transformation of a standard building into a “Green Building” exceeds the simple renova-tion costs by approx. 30 percent.

 

Green Building” creates a new market for en-vironmental-friendly products like wooden structural panels, glass facades, floor surface and glue, heat pumps and inverters as well as many other products.

 

  1. Certification Programs

 

Green Buildings” are usually certified on the basis of green building certification pro-grams. In Thailand, the most important cer-tification systems are:

 

  • Leadership in Energy and Environ-mental Design (“LEED”); and

 

  • Thailand Rating Energy & Environ-ment System (“TREES”).1

 

LEED was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council and is used worldwide. TREES was developed on the basis of LEED and modified to fit Thailand’s par-ticular needs.2

 

 

  • Other certification rating systems are BREEAM (UK), DGNB (Germany), CASBEE (Japan), Green Star (Australia), ESCALE (France), Green Building Tool (Canada), LOTUS (Vietnam), GOBAS (China), GBCC (Korea), HKBEAM (Hong Kong), Green Mark (Singapore), Green Index (Malaysia), TEEAN (Thailand) and PCD (Thailand).

 

  • TREES was developed by the Thai Green Building Institute. Further information can be retrieved under: https://www.tgbi.or.th/ (last retrieved: 15 March 2016).

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

Both rating systems are similar: Among other things, they determine

 

  • criteria to evaluate and certify a building’s construction; and

 

  • its inner and outer design as well as its operation and maintenance.

 

Other criteria relate to the building’s man-agement, its site, landscape, materials and re-sources, energy and atmosphere, water con-servation, recycling and indoor environ-mental quality. Corresponding to those eco-logical aspects, the building is awarded cred-its and will be rated according to its total score.

 

Apart from that, the Thailand Energy & En-vironmental Assessment Method by the Thai Ministry of Energy (“TEEAM”) and an Adaptation of German Sustainable Busi-ness Council by Thai Association of Sustain-able Construction (“DGNB”) have been re-leased recently.

 

Currently, these building standards are not mandatory in Thailand. But this may change since many countries support sustainable construction. In Germany – for instance – official buildings exceeding the construction costs of EUR 1 million have to comply with the Federal Guideline for the Construction of Sustainable Buildings (Leitfaden Nach-haltiges Bauen des Bundes). In Thailand, the use of the LEED and TEEAM certification sys-tems may also become mandatory in the fu-ture. The adaptation of national standards (TEEAM) shows the increasing awareness for this matter.

 

  • Thai Green Building Code and further relevant Regulations

 

A further measure of supporting environ-mental protection is the enactment of the

 

Energy Conservation Promotion Act B.E. 2535 (1992).

 

This Act requires factories or buildings

 

 

 

  1. with an electricity meter value ex-ceeding 1,000 kilowatt; or

 

  1. in which a transformer exceeding 1,175 kilo volt amperes is installed; or

 

  1. having a waste energy of 20 million mega joule per year

 

to

 

  • appoint a specific person in charge of energy usage; and

 

  • provide an annual report regarding the energy usage and a plan concern-ing energy policy, energy training etc. to the Department of Alternative Energy Development and Efficien-cy.

 

To be able to fulfill ones duties properly, the building’s owner can apply for a support fund provided by the Department of Alter-native Energy Development and Efficiency amounting to 20 percent of the sum invest-ed in energy reducing processes.

 

Irrespective of the above, in the case of non-compliance with the aforementioned duties, the building’s owner will be penalized with a fine ranging from THB 50,000 to THB 200,000 and/or imprisonment.

 

Based on the aforementioned Act, the Min-ister of Energy issued the Ministerial Regula-tion re Types or Sizes of Buildings and Standards, Criteria and Methods of Designing Energy Conser-vation Buildings B.E. 2552 (2009). This regula-tion is applicable with regards to govern-mental buildings as well as 9 different other building types. The regulation stipulates that buildings falling into the scope of the regula-tion have to be equipped with an energy sys-tem affecting the energy usage such as a cer-tain level of heat transfer, specific light pow-er and air conditioner size etc. However, this regulation provides no penalty in case of non-compliance.

 

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

At the moment, there are further attempts to expand the regulation to the private sector.

 

  1. Investing in the “Green Building”-Sector

 

The rules governing foreign investment in Thailand are rather restrictive and require foreign investors to apply for a so-called Foreign Business License (“FBL”) if the majority of the shares is held by foreigners.

 

To increase foreign direct investment, the Kingdom of Thailand, however, promotes investments in promising economic sectors. The objective is to attract foreign investors and strengthen the domestic economy. Such investment promotions are granted by the Thailand Board of Investment (“BOI”).

 

  1. “Foreign Business Act”

 

Foreign investors have to respect the rules of the Foreign Business Act B. E. 2542 (1999)

 

(“FBA”). According to the FBA, the follow-ing persons are restricted when doing busi-ness in Thailand:

 

  1. individuals not having the Thai na-tionality;

 

 

 

  • the business is not covered by the scope of the “Foreign Business Act”.

 

The FBA classifies businesses in different categories (list 1, 2 and 3). Foreigners can only operate without an FBL in sectors which are not named in these lists (e. g. export or production). Therefore, investors wishing to produce products for the “Green Building”-industry can do so without an FBL.

 

  1. Investment Promotion by the Thai-land Board of Investment (BOI)

 

Until 31 December 2013, the BOI provided a special promotion category for environ-ment-friendly products and materials. 3 In addition, the manufacture of solar cells and of raw materials for solar cells was promot-ed. 4 Unfortunately, these promotions were not prolonged. However, the following in-vestment promotions remain eligible:

 

  1. a) Investment Promotions

 

Currently, the BOI promotes the production of specific ecological products such as

 

  • electrical products;

 

  • eco-friendly chemicals;

 

 

  • entities which are not registered in Thailand; and

 

  • entities registered in Thailand whose capital is held to at least 50% by for-eign nationals or by foreign entities (irrespective of the amount of partners, shareholders or members) or was invest-ed by those.

 

The aforementioned restrictions exception-ally do not apply if

 

  • if a   Foreign   Business   License

(“FBL”) was granted for the exer-cised business area;

 

  • the business is subject to an excep-tion from the FBA; or

 

  • eco-friendly polymer material; and

 

  • recycling and re-use of unwanted materials and others.

 

The investment incentives granted differ from product to product.

 

The two most important promoted catego-ries regarding “Green Building” are

 

  • the manufacture of solar cells (5.4.2); and
  • Item 1.2.2: activities 6.4 category of the Announce-ment of the Board of Investment No. 1/2556 re-garding Investment Promotion for Sustainable De-velopment.

 

  • Item 1.2.3 activities 5.5.10 category of the aforemen-tioned announcement.

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

  • the “Energy Service Company” (“ESCO”, 7.8).

 

Furthermore, another ESCO incentive is the “ESCO Revolving Fund”. It supplies finan-cial support and investment services such as equity investment, ESCO venture capital, equipment leasing, carbon credit facility, credit guarantee facility and technical assis-tance. The fund collaborates with 11 differ-ent banks and offers a loan of 7 years re-garding energy conservation and renewable energy projects up to THB 50 million with less than 4 percent interest per year.

 

  • “Energy Service Company”-Promotion

 

 

 

However, an FBL is not required for whole-sale/retail if the company registers and fully pays up a share capital amounting to THB 100 million.

 

Should the company want to carry out wholesale activities, an application for the investment promotion “International Trade Centre” (“ITC”) or “Trade and Investment Office” (“TISO”) is sufficient. The whole-sale activities covered by TISO, however, only extend to tools and equipment. ITC covers all wholesale activities. Both invest-ment promotions require annual operating expenses of THB 10 million.

 

  1. Standard for Products

 

 

Before applying for an ESCO-promotion with the BOI, an approval from the Ministry of Energy needs to be obtained. Approvals are only granted on a project basis. Besides this, the scope of the ESCO-promotion is rather narrow and limited to consulting ser-vices.

 

  1. c) BOI Application Procedure

 

The BOI application procedure is investor-friendly and can be performed in a short pe-riod of time since the BOI strives to attract investors to Thailand.

 

  1. Approval of further Activities

 

Foreign investors who plan to perform fur-ther business activities, such as

 

  • wholesale and/or retail; and/or

 

  • services,

 

have to generally apply for an FBL for every single activity as referred to in the FBA.

 

The experience shows that an FBL for activ-ities for wholesale/retail is only granted if there are enough reference points suggesting the concrete business operation will not be competing with Thai market players.

 

Please note that (environment-friendly) products may have to meet standards ac-cording to the Industrial Product Standard Act B.E. 2511 (1968). This Act sets standards for over 2,000 products. The standard is com-pulsory for only about 100 different prod-ucts such as light bulbs, electric wires, safety glasses, etc.

 

An operator may apply for certification in accordance with the industrial standard set under the Thai Industrial Standard Institute by the Ministry of Industry as well as comply with the ISO and IEC standard. The ISO re-fers to standards developed by the Interna-tional Organization for Standardization, the IEC to standards set by the International Electrotechnical Commission (regarding standards and conformity assessment for electrical, electronic and related technolo-gies). As the certification is not compulsory, it seems to be only reasonable regarding marketing objectives.

 

III. Summary

 

Green Building” becomes increasingly impor-tant in Thai public policy. The Thai gov-ernment has enhanced environmental pro-tection measures by enacting numerous laws regarding the construction, equipment and operating standards as well as promoting

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

environment-friendly products. A new mar-ket regarding environment-friendly con-struction materials and similar products is growing. Its development will greatly de-pend on how the Thai government will en-force these laws and standards.

 

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 209    (DE)

 

 

Geschäftsmöglichkeiten

 

für ausländische Investoren im Iran: Ein (steuer-)rechtlicher Lagebericht

 

März 2016

 

 

 

A l l  r i g h t s  r e s e r v e d  ©  L o r e n z  &  P a r t n e r s  2 0 1 6

 

Obwohl Lorenz & Partners große Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in diesen Newslettern bereitgestellten Infor-mationen auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass diese ei-ne individuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen können. Lorenz & Partners übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktuali-tät, Korrektheit oder Vollständigkeit der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Partners, welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nutzung oder Nichtnut-zung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informationen verursacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorliegt.

 

 

 

  1. Einleitung

 

 

Die schrittweise Aufhebung der dem Iran auferlegten internationalen Sanktionen, ins-besondere der Europäischen Union1 und der Vereinten Nationen, hat den iranischen Markt für neue ausländische Investitionen geöffnet. Auf der Grundlage des Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action werden erstmals ab dem 16. Januar 2016 Sanktionen phasen-weise abgebaut.

 

Insbesondere die europäischen Sanktionen hinsichtlich des Transfers von Geldmitteln nach Europa, Bankgeschäften, des Imports und Transport iranischen Öls, Gas und von Petrochemikalien wurden bereits abge-schafft. Weitere Lockerungen werden noch folgen. Da US-amerikanische Sanktionen teilweise noch aufrechterhalten bleiben, er-kunden momentan vornehmlich europäische und asiatische Unternehmen Geschäftsmög-lichkeiten, die sich ihnen im Iran bieten.

 

Dieser Newsletter soll einen Überblick über die Geschäftsmöglichkeiten für ausländische Investoren im Iran verschaffen.

 

 

1 Vgl. Annex II (Sanktionen bezogene Verpflichtungen) des Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action: http://www.eeas.europa.eu/statements-eeas/docs/iran_agreement/annex_2_sanctions_related_ commitments_en.pdf (zuletzt abgerufen am: 08 March 2016).

 

 

  1. Unternehmensgründung

 

 

Das iranische Handelsrecht (Iranian Commer-cial Code – “IR-CC”) sieht folgende Gesell-schaftsformen vor:

 

  • Joint Stock Company (öffentlich (Sherkat Sahami Am) oder privat (Sgerkat Sahami Khass)), vergleichbar mit einer deutschen kleinen AG;

 

  • Limited Liability Company (Sherkat ba Masouliyat Mahdoud), vergleichbar mit einer deutschen GmbH;

 

  • General Partnership (Sherkat Tazamoni), vergleichbar mit einer deutschen GbR;

 

  • Limited Partnership (Sherkat Mokhtalet Ghey Sahami), vergleichbar mit einer deutschen KG;

 

  • Joint Stock Partnership (Sherkat Mokhtalet Sahami);

 

  • Proportional Liability Partnership (Sherkat Nesbi), vergleichbar mit ei-ner deutschen oHG;

 

  • Production and Consumption Co-operative (Sherkat Ta’avoni Towlid va

 

Masaraf).

 

In der Praxis ist die Limited Liability Company

 

(„LLC“) die wichtigste Gesellschaftsform. Diese Gesellschaftsform nehmen haupt-sächlich kleinere Unternehmen oder solche an, die Handel betreiben (vgl. Ziffer 1). Im Übrigen spielt auch die Private Joint Stock

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

Company („PJSC“) eine wichtige Rolle. Für welche Gesellschaftsform sich ein Unter-nehmen entscheidet, hängt im Wesentlichen von der konkreten Art und Umsetzung der Geschäftstätigkeit des Unternehmens ab.

 

Der Umstand, dass die LLC der PJSC zu-meist vorgezogen wird, liegt darin begrün-det, dass die Gründung einer LLC eher in-formell abläuft und deshalb verhält-nismäßig schnell und einfach vollzogen werden kann. Darüberhinaus ist die Gründ-ung, die Strukturierung und die Verwaltung einer LLC günstiger.

 

Dessen ungeachtet wird bei sog. Joint Ventu-res („JV“) in der Regel die Gesellschaftsform der PJSC vorgezogen.

 

  1. Limited Liability Company (GmbH)

 

Eine LLC muss aus mindestens zwei Gesell-schaftern und einem Geschäftsführer beste-hen. Die Staatsangehörigkeit spielt grund-sätzlich keine Rolle. Die Geschäftsführer können aus der Mitte der Gesellschafter oder von außerhalb berufen und können sowohl für einen bestimmten, als auch für einen unbestimmten Zeitraum für die Ge-sellschaft tätig werden.

 

Für den Fall, dass die LLC aus mehr als zwölf Gesellschaftern besteht, muss eine Art „Aufsichtsrat“ gebildet werden, der die Ge-sellschaft überprüft.

 

Das Mindestkapital beträgt 1.800.000 IRR (ca. 45 EUR). Um als seriöse Gesellschaft angesehen zu werden, ist ein eingebrachtes Mindestkapital von 400.000.000 IRR (10.000 EUR) empfehlenswert.

 

 

Die Gesellschafter haften für Forderungen der LLC lediglich in Höhe ihrer jeweiligen Einlage(n). Die beschränkte Haftung gilt aber nur, wenn der Name des Unter-nehmens („Firma“) den Zusatz „limited liability“ enthält. Das Unternehmen muss ei-ne iranische Firma haben und sollte keines-falls den Namen der Gesellschafter enthal-ten, da ansonsten für Außenstehende die Gefahr der Verwechslung mit einer GbR be-steht.

 

Die Übertragung von Gesellschaftsanteilen an Dritte setzt zum einen eine zustimmende Dreiviertelmehrheit der Anteilseigner, zum anderen eine beglaubigte Urkunde voraus. Die Übertragung von Anteilen ist folglich aufwendig.

 

Die Beteiligung an einer LLC kann unter gewissen Umständen zu 100 % ausländisch sein (vgl. Ziffer III. 1.).

 

  1. Joint Ventures

 

Ausländische Unternehmen können sich auch mit einem iranischen Partner zu einem vertraglichen oder gesellschaftsrechtlichen JV zusammenschließen. Dies kann gerade beim Einstieg in den iranischen Markt rat-sam sein, da dieser nur in den wesentlichen Bereichen und auch dort nur teilweise ent-wickelt ist.

 

Bei einem JV schließen sich mindestens zwei (juristische) Personen mit ihrem Wissen und Kapital zusammen, um durch eine unter-nehmerische Tätigkeit Gewinn zu erzielen. Wie in anderen Rechtsordnungen auch, ist die Wahl des richtigen (JV-)Partners von überragender Bedeutung. Lorenz & Partners

 

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

unterstützt Sie gern bei der Suche nach ei-nem zuverlässigen Partner.

 

Das JV ist im Gesetz nicht ausdrücklich ge-regelt. Die Parteien können ihr JV auf einer „freiwilligen Basis“ in Form einer zivilrecht-lichen Partnerschaft nach Art. 573 des irani-schen Zivilgesetzbuches errichten und die Einzelheiten durch Vertrag regeln. Art. 3 des

Foreign  Investment  Promotion  and  Protection  Act

 

(“FIPPA”) bestimmt, dass die zivilrechtliche

 

Partnerschaft auch eine Form der Investition darstellt und deshalb als JV begründet wer-den kann.

 

Bei einem gesellschaftsrechtlichen JV grün-den Gesellschafter eine Gesellschaft, die sog.

Joint Venture Company („JVC“). Die JVC ist eine selbstständige juristische Person, deren Gesellschafter eine bestimmte Anzahl an Anteilen innehaben. Oft nehmen diese JVC die Gesellschaftsform einer PJSC an, die den ausländischen Investoren ermöglicht, die Geschäftsführung effektiv zu kontrollieren.

 

  1. Private Joint Stock Company

 

Wie in anderen Rechtsordnungen auch, nehmen die Anteilseigner einer Joint Stock Company im Verhältnis zu ihren Anteilen an der Gesellschaft teil. Dies erfolgt durch Ein-zahlung des registrierten Kapitals, durch Gewinn- und Verlusttragung sowie bei der Aufteilung des Auseinandersetzungsgutes im Falle einer Liquidation. Die Haftung der Ge-sellschafter ist auf die Höhe ihrer Einlagen beschränkt. Die PJSC ist eine selbstständige juristische Person. Die Anteilseigner haben die üblichen Rechte, die sich aus ihrer Posi-tion ergeben, einschließlich des Rechtes auf Beiwohnung von Anteilseignerversamm-

 

 

lungen, auf Finanzberichte, auf die Ernen-nung und den Austausch des „Vorstandes“ (englisch „Board of Directors“) sowie das

 

Stimmrecht bei gewichtigen Entscheidun-gen.

 

Aktionär kann auch ein ausländischer Staats-angehöriger sein. Nur in Bezug auf Tätig-keitsbereiche des nationalen Entwicklungs-planes gilt, dass iranische Staatsangehörige Aktien halten müssen.

 

Die charakteristischsten Merkmale der PJSC sind, dass zertifizierte Aktien bestehen, sie von mindestens drei Aktionären gehalten werden und das Mindestkapital 1.800.000 IRR (ca. 45 EUR) beträgt. Auch hier empfehlen wir aus den oben genannten Gründen ein Kapital von mindestens 400.000.000 IRR (10.000 EUR).

 

Auch wenn bis zur Gründung der PJSC nur 35 % des Kaptials eingezahlt werden müs-sen, muss 100 % des Kapitals gezeichnet werden.

 

Das management board of members muss alle zwei Jahre neu gewählt werden. Eine Wie-derwahl der Mitglieder ist möglich. Das ma-nagement board of members muss der Anteilseignerversammlung einmal im Jahr den Finanzbericht des letzten Geschäftsjah-res vorlegen. Dieser muss von der Anteilseignerversammlung angenommen werden.

 

  1. Zeitrahmen

 

Die Unternehmensgründung dauert, je nach-dem welche Gesellschaftsform gewählt wird, durchschnittlich ca. drei Monate ab dem

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

Zeitpunkt, an dem alle erforderlichen Doku-mente vorgelegt werden.

 

III. Investitionsförderung

 

 

  1. Foreign Investment  Promotion   and

 

Protection Act

 

Eine Auslandsinvestition kann entweder nach den Vorschriften des Companies Regist-ration Act oder des Foreign Investment Promotion and Protection Act (“FIPPA”) ausgeführt werden. Da der FIPPA die meisten Förde-rungen vorsieht, wird an dieser Stelle nur auf diesen Weg eingegangen:

 

Der FIPPA ist auf ausländische Direkt-investitionen im privaten Tätigkeitsbereich zur Entwicklung und Förderung der Produ-ktion in den Bereichen Industrie, Bergbau, Landwirtschaft und im Dienstleistungs-sektor sowie teilweise auch im öffentlichen Bereich anzuwenden. Für Investitionen, die im Rahmen einer öffentlichen Ausschreib-ung eines Projekts getätigt werden, gelten besondere Vorschriften.

 

Unter einer ausländischen Investition im Sinne des FIPPA werden nicht nur solche von Ausländern, sondern auch von Iranern verstanden, wenn das verwendete Kapital aus dem Ausland stammt.

 

Der FIPPA stellt in- und ausländische In-vestoren gleich, Art. 9 FIPPA. Danach kön-nen die Anteile an einer Gesellschaft zu 100 % in ausländischer Hand liegen. Es gibt keine Begrenzung im Hinblick auf den Um-fang der Investition, den Transfer von Ge-winn und die Rückführung von Kapital ins Ausland. Ferner bietet der FIPPA Schutz

 

 

vor Enteignung und Verstaatlichung von Unternehmen (außer bei nicht dis-kriminierendem öffentlichem Interesse). Das Ge-setz vereinfacht zudem das Verfahren, um Aufenthalts- und Arbeitsgenehmigungen zu erhalten. Für ausländische Investoren, Ge-schäftsführer und Experten sowie deren unmittelbare Familienmitglieder wird grundsätzlich eine Aufenthaltsgenehmigung von drei Jahren gewährt.

 

Um in den Genuss der Vorteile des FIPPA zu kommen, muss der Investor einen An-trag bei der Organisation for Investment, Economic and Technical Assistance of Iran

 

(“OIETA”) stellen. 2 Diese erteilt mit Zu-stimmung des Wirtschafts- und Finanz-ministers innerhalb von 15 Tagen (je nach Größe der Investition) eine Investitionslizenz, wenn die folgenden Voraussetzungen erfüllt sind:

 

  • Die Investition fördert Wirtschafts-wachstum, Technik, Produktqualität, Arbeitsplätze und Exporte und ge-währleistet den Einstieg in internati-onale Märkte;

 

  • Die Investition steht der nationalen Sicherheit und öffentlichen Interes-sen nicht entgegen und schwächt nicht nationale Investoren und ge-fährdet nicht die Umwelt;

 

  • Die Investition führt nicht zur Ge-währung spezieller Rechte, die die Begründung einer Monopolstellung fördern;

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

  • Der durchschnittliche Waren- und Leistungswert, der durch ausländ-ische Investitionen generiert wird, überschreitet in einem Wirtschafts-bereich nicht 25 % und in einem Wirtschaftszweig nicht 35 %, vgl. Art. 5, Art. 6 FIPPA.

 

  • Free Trade-Industrial Zones and Spe-cific Economic Zones

 

Abgesehen von den Begünstigungen des FIPPA gibt es noch die Free Trade-Industrial and Special Economic Zones, in denen Unter-nehmen gegründet werden können:

 

  1. a) Historischer Hintergrund

 

Die Free Zones wurden im September 1993 auf der Grundlage des Law on Administration of the Free Trade/Industrial Zones errichtet. Die ersten Free Zones waren Kish Island, Quesh Island und Port Chabahar. Danach wurden für diese Zonen Spezial- und Nebengesetze, u. a. betreffend Ein- und Ausfuhr, Investiti-onen, Versicherungen, Bankwesen und Ar-beit, getroffen. Soweit es Spezialgesetze gibt, findet das eigentliche iranische Recht in den Zonen keine Anwendung.

 

Die Free Trade Industrial and Special Economic Zones sollen zu Wohlstand, wirtschaftlicher Entwicklung und Wirtschaftswachstum, der Förderung von Investitionen, der Pro-duktion von Industriegütern, der Erhöhung der nationalen Arbeitsplätze und des Lohnes beitragen. Deshalb wurden für ausländische Investoren bei der Gründung einer Gesell-schaft verschiedene Steuervorteile und sons-tige Anreize gesetzt. Z. B. wurden der Han-del und verschiedene industrielle Tätig-

 

 

keiten in den Zonen vereinfacht. Die wich-tigste Begünstigung ist die Steuerbefreiung, die nur in der Free Trade-Industrial Zone ge-währt wird.

 

Im Gegensatz zu den Special Economic Zones haben Free Trade-Industrial Zones signifikante Vorteile. Der Wichtigste ist die Steuer-befreiung, die nur in den Free Trade-Industrial Zones gewährt wird.

 

  1. b) Free Trade-Industrial Zones

 

Es   gibt   sieben   Free   Trade-Industrial  Zones

 

(“FTIZ”). Diese bieten folgende Vorteile:

 

  • Steuerbefreiung für 20 Jahre ab der Aufnahme der geschäftlichen Tätig-keit;
  • Möglichkeit 100 % der Anteile in ausländischer Hand zu halten;
  • Keine Beschränkungen bei der Rückführung von Kapital und Ge-winn ins Ausland;

 

  • Schutz und Garantien für ausländ-ische Investitionen;

 

  • Abschaffung von Einreisevisa und vereinfachter Erhalt einer Aufent-haltsgenehmigung;
  • Vereinfachung des Arbeits- und So-zialrechts;
  • Verwendung von Rohmaterial/-stoffen, Öl, Gas und Kraftstoff für sämtliche industriellen Tätigkeiten.

 

  • Special Economic Zones

 

Entlang der inner-iranischen Grenze gibt es viele Special Economic Zones („SEZ“), die die Ein- und Ausfuhr von Waren vereinfachen

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

sollen. Die Vorteile in diesen Zonen umfas-sen u. a.:

 

  • Treuhänderische Verwahrung von Waren;

 

 

Die wichtigsten nationalen Steuergesetze sind der Direct Taxes Act (2010) (“IR-DTL”) und das VAT Law (2008) (“IR-VATL”).

 

Die wichtigesten Steuern sind die „Salary In-come Tax“, die Steuer auf Unternehmensein-

 

  • Einfuhr von  Waren  aus  dem  Aus-künfte und die Körperschaftsteuer. Außer-

 

 

land oder aus einer FTIZ oder aus einem Industriebereich mit minima-lem Zollaufwand, schnelle Durch-fuhr nach den geltenden Vorschrif-ten;

 

  1. Protokolleinträge von Waren können im Einzelnen ohne Zollformalitäten ausgeführt werden;

 

  1. Waren, die von außerhalb oder aus industriellen Zonen oder anderen Handelszonen eingeführt werden, können ohne Formalitäten ausge-führt werden;

 

  1. Alle Waren, die für die Produktion oder zur Leistungserbringung in die Zone eingeführt werden, werden von den allgemeinen Ein- und Aus-fuhrregeln ausgenommen;

 

  1. Waren, die in den SEZ hergestellt wurden, unterliegen nicht der Preis-regulierung.

 

  1. Steuerrecht

 

Der Iran hat mit vielen anderen Ländern Doppelbesteuerungsabkommen abgeschlos-sen, u. a. Deutschland, Frankreich und Ös-terreich. Das Doppelbesteuerungsab-kommen zwischen Deutschland und dem Iran ist am 30. Dezember 1969 in Kraft ge-treten. Deutschland und der Iran verhandeln derzeit ein neues Doppelbesteuerungsab-kommen.

 

dem gibt es weitere Steuern, wie z. B. die Mehrwertsteuer (9 %) und die Stempelsteu-er. Aus Gründen der Anschaulichkeit kön-nen diese nicht alle dargestellt werden.

 

  1. Salary Income Tax

 

Die Salary Income Tax fällt auf das Gesamt-einkommen an, das ein Arbeitnehmer im Rahmen seiner Beschäftigung durch Leist-ungen erzielt.

 

Der Arbeitgeber führt die Steuer unmittelbar an die zuständige Stelle ab, indem er einen Teil des Lohns abzieht.

 

Der Steuersatz hängt von der Höhe des Lohns ab, den der Arbeitgeber erzielt:

 

  • Bei einem jährlichen Lohn von 138.000.000 IRR (ca. 3.500 EUR): Befreiung von der Lohnsteuer;

 

  • Bei einem  jährlichen  Lohn  von

 

138,000.001 IRR bis zu
966.000.000 IRR (ca. 3.500 bis
24.200 EUR): 10 % Lohnsteuer;

 

  • Bei einem jährlichen Lohn von mehr als 966.000.000 IRR (ca. 24.200 EUR): 20 %

 

  1. Steuer auf Unternehmenseinkünfte

 

Die Steuer auf Unternehmenseinkünfte fällt auf Einkünfte an, die durch selbstständige Arbeit erlangt werden. Handwerker, die in

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

Art. 96 IR-DTL genannt sind, müssen stets die für die Steuer erforderlichen Dokumente und Aufzeichnungen bereithalten.

 

Der Steuersatz beträgt:

 

 

pauschal 25 %. Besteuert wird der im Iran und außerhalb erwirtschaftete Ertrag der Gesellschaft abzüglich bestimmter Verluste und vorgeschriebener Steuerbefreiungen.

 

  1. Zusammenfassung

 

 

  1. 15 %  bei  jährlichen  Einkünften  in

 

Höhe von 30.000.000 IRR
(ca. 750 EUR);

 

  • 20 %  bei  jährlichen  Einkünften  in

 

Höhe von 30.000.001 bis 100.000.000 IRR (ca. 750 bis 2.500 EUR);

 

  1. 25 % bei jährlichen Einkünften in Höhe von 100.000.001 bis 250.000.000 IRR (ca. 2.500 bis 6.250 EUR);
  2. 30 % bei jährlichen Einkünften in Höhe von 250.000.001 bis 1.000.000.000 IRR (ca. 6.250 bis 25.000 EUR);
  3. 35 % bei jährlichen Einkünften von

 

mehr als 1.000.000.000 IRR
(ca. 25.000 EUR).

 

  1. Körperschaftsteuer

 

Die iranische Besteuerung basiert auf dem erklärten Buchgewinn. Sofern sich kein an-derer Steuersatz aus dem IR-DTL ergibt, be-trägt der Steuersatz der Körperschaftsteuer

 

 

Iran bietet eine Vielzahl an Investitions-anreizen und -vergünstigungen, wie z. B. die Möglichkeit als Ausländer 100 % der Antei-le einer Gesellschaft zu halten, Steuer-befreiungen und Schutz vor Enteignung. Ferner steht es ausländischen Investoren frei, aus einer Vielzahl von etablierten Ge-sellschaftsformen zu wählen.

 

Auch wenn der Iran formal ein fortentwi-ckeltes Rechtssystem hat, ist Vorsicht gebo-ten, um unliebsamen Überraschungen vor-zubeugen. Zudem sollte nicht aus den Au-gen verloren werden, dass auf Grundlage des “Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action” einige, nicht aber alle Sanktionen aufgehoben wur-den.

 

Es ist deshalb im Vorfeld der Investition ratsam, eine Anwaltskanzlei, die Erfahrung auf dem Gebiet des iranischen und inter-nationalen Gesellschafts- und Steuerrechts hat, zu konsultieren.

 

 

 

Newsletter No. 209 (EN)

 

 

 

Business Opportunities

 

for Foreigners in Iran:

 

A Legal and Tax Update

 

 

March 2016

 

 

 

A l l  r i g h t s  r e s e r v e d  ©  L o r e n z  &  P a r t n e r s  2 0 1 6

 

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information pro-vided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, in-cluding any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated de-liberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

 

  1. Introduction

 

The reduction of international sanctions against Iran, in particular the sanctions by the European Union 1 and the United Na-tions, has opened the country’s market for new foreign investment. In the Joint Compre-hensive Plan of Action, the parties agreed on a phased reduction of the sanctions starting on the Implementation Day on 16 January 2016.

 

Especially European sanctions regarding the transfer of funds to the E.U., banking activi-ties, the import and transport of Iranian oil, gas and petrochemicals have been lifted. Further sanctions will be abolished step by step. As U.S. sanctions partially remain in force, primarily European and Asian com-panies are currently exploring business op-portunities in Iran.

 

This newsletter shall give an overview on business opportunities for foreign investors in Iran.

 

 

 

  1. Company Set-Up

 

The Iranian Commercial Code (“IR-CC”) in-cludes the following forms of companies, corporations and partnerships:

 

  • Joint Stock Company (public (Sherkat Sahami Am) or private (Sherkat Sahami Khass)), similar to a German small AG;

 

  • Limited Liability Company (Sherkat ba Masouliyat Mahdoud), similar to a Ger-man GmbH;

 

  • General Partnership (Sherkat Ta-zamoni), similar to a German GbR;

 

  • Limited Partnership (Sherkat Mokhtalet Gheyr Sahami), similar to a German KG;

 

  • Joint Stock Partnership (Sherkat Mok-htalet Sahami);

 

  • Proportional Liability Partnership (Sherkat Nesbi), similar to a German oHG;

 

  • Production and Consumption Coop-erative (Sherkat Ta’avoni Towlid va Mas-raf).

 

 

 

 

In  practice,  the   Limited  Liability  Company

 

(“LLC”) is the most relevant and common entity type, mainly used by smaller busi-nesses or for trading (see under 1.). The Private Joint Stock Company (“PJSC”) is also used very often as a company form. Which form

 

 

 

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

is chosen, depends on the company’s spe-cific business plans.

 

The LLC is preferred because the set-up procedure of an LLC is quick, easy and less formal. Besides, the set-up, structure and operation of an LLC is less expensive than the respective costs of a PJSC.

 

However, for Joint Ventures (“JV”) between foreigners and Iranians, the most frequently used company form is the PJSC (see under 2. and. 3.).

 

  1. Limited Liability Company

 

The foundation of an LLC requires at least two partners and one manager, regardless of which nationality. The directors are chosen from the partners or from outside of the company. They can manage the LLC for a limited or unlimited period of time.

 

If the company consists of more than twelve partners, a board of supervisors must be es-tablished to control them.

 

The minimum capital is IRR 1,800,000 (approx. USD 50 ). We would advise to have a fully paid up capital of IRR 35,000,000 (USD 10,000), so the company is considered reliable.

 

The capital is not divided in shares. The partners are liable for the company’s debts, limited to the extent of their contributions only. But the liability of the shareholders is only limited if the company’s name contains the phrase “limited liability”.

 

The company’s name has to be in Farsi. The name of the company should not include the name of any of the partners. Otherwise, the

 

 

 

partner whose name is part of the com-pany’s name will by third parties be looked upon as a member of a general partnership.

 

A partner’s contribution cannot be trans-ferred to a third party without a three quar-ters majority consent of the partners as well as the notarization of a deed. Therefore, the transfer process tends to be quite compli-cated.

 

The LLC can be owned up to 100 % by for-eigners under certain conditions (see under III. 1.).

 

  1. Joint Ventures

 

Foreign companies may also establish a con-tractual or a corporative Joint Venture (“JV”) with Iranian partners. This may be advisable when entering the Iranian market. It should particularly be taken into consideration at this stage, since the market is partly devel-oped in crucial areas only. An Iranian part-ner may help to set up respective structures.

 

To form a JV, at least two (juristic) persons must gather their capital and knowledge with the aim to make profit by running a busi-ness. As in other jurisdictions, the selection process of a JV partner is of the essence. Lorenz & Partners can assist in finding reli-able partners.

 

JVs are not expressly regulated by law. The parties can arrange a JV based on the legal form of a civil partnership according to Art. 573 of the Iranian Civil Code and deter-mine the details of their partnership in a contract. Art. 3 of the Foreign Investment Pro-motion and Protection Act (“FIPPA”) also states civil partnerships as a method of in-

 

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

vesting, which can be established in the form of a JV.

 

In the corporative JV, partners establish a company known as a Joint Venture Company

 

(“JVC”), an independent legal entity, where-by each of the partners owns a specific per-centage of its shares. In this case, JVCs are often operated as PJSC allowing foreign in-vestors to control the management more ef-fectively.

 

  1. Private Joint Stock Company

 

The shareholders of an Iranian joint stock company participate in paying up the regis-tered capital, ownership, profit and losses, and the distribution of assets in liquidation, in proportion to the shares held. The liability of each shareholder is limited to the par value of his shares. The PJSC is an inde-pendent juridical person; the shareholders have the usual shareholder rights, including the right to attend shareholders’ meetings, receive financial reports, elect and replace the board of directors, and vote on major decisions of the company.

 

There are no legal restrictions with respect to the nationality of persons who may form a PJSC. As a matter of policy, however, the Iranian government generally requires Ira-nian shareholders’ participation in fields of activities deemed important to the nation’s development programs.

 

The most striking features of a PJSC are that it has certified shares, a minimum of three shareholders, as well as a minimum capital of IRR 1,800,000 (approx. USD 50). We ad-vise a fully paid up capital of at least IRR 350,000,000 (approx. USD 10,000).

 

 

 

Although only 35 % of a company’s capital needs to be paid in at the time of the forma-tion, 100 % of the capital must be sub-scribed.

 

The management board of members has to change every two years. Re-election of the members is possible. The management board of members has to present a fiscal re-port to the assembly of shareholders every year regarding the last fiscal year. This report will have to be approved by the assembly of shareholders.

 

  1. Timeline

 

The set-up of a company will take, depend-ing on its form, an average of three months after submitting all necessary documents.

 

III. Investment Promotions and Incen-tives

 

  1. Foreign Investment  Promotion   and

 

Protection Act

 

A foreign investment can be carried out ei-ther in accordance with the regulations as prescribed in the Companies Registration Act or those of the Foreign Investment Promotion and Protection Act (“FIPPA”). Since the latter of-fers more incentives, this newsletter will only elaborate on the FIPPA.

 

The FIPPA applies to foreign direct invest-ment in the fields of permitted activities in the private sector, for the purpose of devel-opment and promoting production activities in industry, mining, agriculture and services, as well as under certain circumstances in the public sector. For the investment of foreign governments, special rules apply.

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

Foreign investment does not require the in-vestor being a non-Iranian individual or an entity. The FIPPA also applies to Iranian in-vestors using capital originating from abroad.

 

Under the FIPPA, the foreign investor re-ceives the status of a domestic investor, Art. 9 FIPPA. Most importantly, 100 % of the shares can be held by foreign individuals or entities. There is also no limitation re-garding the investment volume, profit trans-fer or capital repatriation. The FIPPA guar-antees protection against expropriation (unless in public interest and in a non-discriminatory manner). It also facilitates the procedure of acquiring a residence and work permit. For foreign investors, directors, experts and their immediate family members, a residence permit of three years can generally be issued.

 

To acquire the benefits under the FIPPA, the investor has to submit an application with the Organisation for Investment, Economic and Technical Assistance of Iran (“OIETA”). 2

 

An investment license will be issued by the OIETA with the approval of the Minister of Economic Affairs and Finance within approx. 15 days (depending on the range of the in-vestment) if the following conditions are ful-filled:

 

 

  • The investment  provides  economic

 

growth, promotes technology, quality of products, increases employment

 

 

 

  • The application form can be downloaded at http://www.investiniran.ir/OIETA_content/medi a/image/2014/03/3719_orig.pdf (last retrieved on: 08 March 2016).

 

 

 

opportunities and exports, and enables to enter international markets;

 

  • The investment does not jeopardize national security and public interests or harm the environment or interrupt the national economy or disrupt prod-ucts of domestic investments;

 

  • The investment does not involve the granting of any special rights resulting in a monopoly;

 

  • The value ratio of goods and services produced by aggregate of foreign in-vestments does not exceed 25 % in each economic sector and shall not exceed 35 % in each economic branch, Art. 5, 6 FIPPA.

 

  • Free Trade-Industrial Zones and Spe-cial Economic Zones

 

Apart from the investment incentives granted under the FIPPA, there are numer-ous Free Trade-Industrial and Special Economic Zones in which investors can set-up their business:

 

  1. a) Background

 

Free Zones were created based on the Law on Administration of the Free Trade/Industrial Zones in September 1993. The first Free Zones were Kish Island, Qeshm Island and the Port of Chabahar. Step by step, specific laws and by-laws were adopted which stipulated provisions regarding import, export, invest-ment, insurance, banking, labour and em-ployment in the aforementioned zones. As far as there are special laws, the laws govern-ing the Iranian mainland (general Iranian laws) do not apply.

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

The Free Trade Industrial and Special Economic Zones shall contribute to prosperity, eco-nomic development and growth, promotion of investment, active presence in local and international markets, production of indus-trial goods and services increase in national income and employment. Therefore, inves-tors are granted various tax and legal incen-tives if establishing a foreign company in a

 

Free Trade Industrial or Special Economic Zone. For instance, the trade and industrial activi-ties are facilitated in these zones by reduc-ing, among other things, formalities regard-ing customs, banking and financial systems, insurance and labour laws.

 

Compared to Special Economic Zones, Free Trade-Industrial Zones have significant advan-tages. The most important one is the tax ex-emption which is only granted in the Free Trade-Industrial Zones.

 

  1. b) Free Trade-Industrial Zones

 

There  are  seven  Free  Trade-Industrial Zones

 

(“FTIZ”). Herein may be granted:

 

  • Tax exemption for 20 years from the date of commencement of operation for all economic activities;

 

  • 100 % foreign ownership;

 

  • Freedom to repatriate capital and profits;

 

  • Protection and guarantees for foreign investments;

 

  • Abolition of entry visas and easier is-suance of residence permits for for-eigners;

 

  • Facilitated regulation on labour rela-tions, employment and social security;

 

 

 

  • Transfer of manufactured goods out-side the trade zones without paying customs duties;

 

  • Right to employ trained and skilled manpower in all different skill levels and professions;

 

  • Utilization of raw materials, oil and gas as feedstock and fuel for all indus-trial activities.

 

  • Special Economic Zones

 

There   are   various   Special  Economic   Zones

 

(“SEZ”) located near the inner-borders of Iran in order to facilitate import and export of goods. The incentives in the SEZ include:

 

  1. Maintenance of goods in trust;

 

  1. Import of goods from abroad or from FTIZ or industrial areas with minimal customs formalities and quick internal transit will be performed in accor-dance with the relevant regulations;

 

  1. Some log entry of merchandise can be carried out without any customs for-malities;

 

  1. Goods imported from outside or from industrial areas or other commercial zones can be exported without any customs formalities;

 

  1. All the goods imported into the region for the required production or services are exempted from the general im-port-export laws;

 

  1. Goods manufactured in SEZ are not subject to price regulation.

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

  1. Tax Law

 

Iran concluded double taxation agreements with many countries, among others, Austria, France and Germany. The double taxation agreement with Germany came into effect on 30 December 1969. A new double taxa-tion agreement with Germany is currently under negotiation.

 

The major national tax laws are the Direct Taxes Act (2010) (“IR-DTL”) and the VAT Law (2008) (“IR-VATL”). The most important taxes are the salary income tax, the tax on business income and the corpo-rate income tax. Others important taxes in-clude VAT (9 %) and stamp duty.

 

  1. Salary Income Tax

 

The salary income tax is the tax imposed on the total income an employee obtains for services rendered with regards to an occupa-tion.

 

It is paid by the employer by making a salary deduction and submitting the tax directly to the competent tax authority.

 

The taxation rate depends on the amount paid to the employee:

 

  • Up to IRR 138,000,000 (approx. USD 4,000) annual salary: exemption from the salary income tax;

 

  • From IRR 138,000,001 to 966,000,000 (approx. USD 4,000 to 28,000) annual salary: 10 % salary income tax rate;

 

  • Exceeding IRR 966,000,000 (approx-USD 28,000) annual salary: 20 % sal-ary income tax rate.

 

 

 

  1. Tax on Business Income

 

The tax on “business income” is imposed on the income earned when working inde-pendently. Artisans as mentioned in Art. 96 IR-DTL have to maintain the necessary documents and records regarding the busi-ness income tax.

 

The tax rates are as follows:

 

  • 15 % for an annual income up to IRR

 

30,000,000 (approx. USD 900);

 

  • 20 % for an annual income from IRR

 

30,000,001 to 100,000,000 (approx. USD 900 to 2,900);

 

  • 25 % for an annual income from IRR

 

100,000,001 to 250,000,000 (approx. USD 2,900 to 7,200);

 

  • 30 % for an annual income from IRR

 

250,000,001 to 1,000,000,000 (approx. USD 7,200 to 28,600);

 

  • 35 % for an annual income over IRR

 

1,000,000 (approx. USD 28,600).

 

  1. Corporate Income Tax

 

Iranian corporate income tax is based on the declared accounting profit. Unless other rates are prescribed by the IR-DTL, corpo-rate income is taxed at a flat rate of 25 %. Taxable income is the income of companies derived from sources in Iran or abroad, mi-nus the loss resulting from non-exempt sources, minus the prescribed exemptions.

 

  1. Summary

 

The Iranian government grants a range of investment promotions and incentives, such as 100% foreign ownership, tax exemptions

 

 

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

 

and protection against expropriation. Fur-thermore, foreign investors can choose from a range of legal forms provided by the Ira-nian Commercial Law.

 

Even though Iran has a developed legal sys-tem, it may hold surprises. Finally, it should be kept in mind that the Joint Comprehensive

 

 

 

Plan of Action abolished some, but not all sanctions against Iran. It is therefore advis-able to engage a law firm which is experi-enced in Iranian and international business and tax law in advance when structuring in-vestments.

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 210    (DE)

 

 

 

 

 

Erneuerbare Energien

 

in Thailand

 

 

April 2016

 

Obwohl Lorenz & Partners große Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in diesen Newslettern bereitgestellten Infor-mationen auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass diese ei-ne individuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen können. Lorenz & Partners übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktuali-tät, Korrektheit oder Vollständigkeit der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Partners, welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nutzung oder Nichtnut-zung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informationen verursacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorliegt.

 

 

 

Abstract

 

Der nachfolgende Beitrag soll einen Über-blick über die Situation des Energiesektors in Thailand darstellen (I.), wobei insbeson-dere Bezug genommen wird auf den kürzlich veröffentlichen Energieplan 2036 (II.). Der Fokus dieses Planes – und dementsprechend dieses Beitrages – liegt auf Erneuerbaren Energien. Neben der allgemeinen Bedeutung Erneuerbarer Energien für Thailand soll de-tailliert auf die einzelnen Fördermöglichkei-ten eingegangen werden, die die thailändi-sche Regierung Investoren zur Verfügung stellt (III.). Zudem werden unter IV. die für ausländische Investoren geltenden Be-schränkungen und mögliche Befreiungen hiervon erörtert. Abschließend soll, soweit möglich, ein Ausblick auf zukünftige Ent-wicklungen gegeben werden (V.).

 

  1. Einführung

 

Thailands Gesamtenergieverbrauch wird bis 2021 voraussichtlich um 30% steigen, wobei der Energieverbauch derzeit noch vorwie-gend über fossile Brennstoffe gedeckt wird, insbesondere Gas und Kohle. Während Gas zu großen Mengen im Inland gewonnen wird, müssen Kohle und Erdöl größtenteils importiert werden. Aufgrund dieser Import-abhängigkeit hängt Thailands Energiever-sorgung derzeit stark von den regionalen po-litischen Entwicklungen ab.

 

 

Neben Klimaschutzgründen sind Erneuer-bare Energien, die im eigenen Land gewon-nen werden können, daher auch aus politi-schen Gründen für Thailand interessant und mittlerweile im Fokus der Regierung.

 

  1. Energieplan 2036

 

Die thailändische Regierung hat es sich zum Ziel gesetzt, den Anteil von Erneuerbaren Energien am Gesamtverbrauch bis 2036 auf 30% auszubauen. Zudem hat der thailändi-sche Premierminister erst kürzlich auf dem UN-Klimagipfel in Paris bekanntgegeben, dass es das Ziel der thailändischen Regie-rung ist, den Ausstoß von Treibhausgasen bis 2036 um 25% zu reduzieren.

 

  1. Politische Pläne

 

Um diese Ziele zu erreichen, hat die thailän-dische Regierung bereits entsprechende Maßnahmen beschlossen:

 

Mitte 2015 hat die Regierung den Thailand Integrated Energy Blueprint („TIEB“), einen umfassenden Plan zur Entwicklung der Energiewirtschaft bis 2036, vorgestellt, der die folgenden Ziele verfolgt:

 

  • Erneuerbare Energien sollen ein Hauptbestandteil der nationalen Energieversorgung werden, um fos-sile Brennstoffe und Erdölimporte zu ersetzen

 

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

  • Stärkung der nationalen Energiesi-cherheit
  • Schaffung von Anlagen zur alterna-tiven Energiegewinnung auf kom-munaler Ebene

 

  • Landesweite Unterstützung für die Produktion Erneuerbarer Energien

 

  • Förderung der Wettbewerbsfähigkeit durch Forschung und Entwicklung

 

Der TIEB beinhaltet die folgenden eigen-ständigen Pläne:

 

  • den Alternative Energy Development Plan 2015 – 2036 („AEDP“),

 

  • den Power Development Plan 2015 2036 („PDP“),
  • den Energy Efficiency Plan 2015 2036

(„EEP“),

  • den Gas Plan 2015 2036 und

 

  • den Oil Plan 2015 2036.

 

Der AEDP wurde am 17.9.2015 vom thai-

 

ländischen National Energy Policy Council  ver-

 

abschiedet und definiert Ziele zur Steigerung Erneuerbarer Energie von derzeit ca. 7.300 MW auf knapp 20.000 MW bis 2036. Für die einzelnen Bereiche sind die folgenden Kapa-zitäten vorgesehen:

 

  • Abfall: 550 MW (derzeit ca. 65 MW)
  • Biomasse: 5.570 MW (derzeit ca. 2.500 MW)

 

  • Biogas aus Abfall/Abwasser: 600 MW (derzeit ca. 300 MW)

 

  • Biogas aus Pflanzen: 680 MW
  • Windenergie: 3.002 MW (derzeit ca. 225 MW)
  • Solarenergie: 6.000 MW (derzeit 1.300 MW)

 

  • Wasserkraft klein: 376 MW (derzeit 142 MW)
  • Wasserkraft groß: unverändert (der-zeit ca. 3.000 MW)

 

Der PDP legt die strategischen Ziele für Thailands Energiewirtschaft fest, nämlich

 

 

  • Wirtschaftlichkeit und

 

Der EEP sieht vor, die Energieintensität (Verbrauch geteilt durch das Bruttoinlands-produkt) bis 2036 um 30 Prozent zu redu-zieren.

 

  1. Behörden

 

Das Ministry of Energy und der Premierminis-ter sind für die politischen Entscheidungen in Sachen Energiepolitik zuständig und ver-antwortlich. Ihnen unterstehen auf Pla-nungs- und Ausführungsebene die folgen-den Stellen:

 

  • Energy Policy and Planning Office („EPPO“) des Ministry of Energy

 

Das EPPO ist zuständig für die Entwicklung der grundlegenden Strategie der Energiewirtschaft.

 

  • Department of Alternative Energy Devel-opment and Efficiency („DEDE“) des Ministry of Energy

 

Das DEDE ist zuständig für die Förderung Erneuerbarer Energien und untersucht mögliche Wege um ungenutztes Potenzial nutzbar zu machen.

 

  • Electricity Generating Authority of Thai-land („EGAT“)

 

Die EGAT ist ein von Ministry of Energy geführtes Staatsunternehmen, das die Mehrheit der Kraftwerke und der Energieinfrastruktur betreibt.

 

  • Energy Regulation Commission („ERC“)

Die ERC dient als Regulierungs- und Aufsichtsbehörde für den thailändi-schen Energiemarkt.

 

  • Metropolitan Energy Authority („MEA“)

 

 

  1. Versorgungssicherheit

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

  • und Provincial Energy    Authorities

(„PEA“)

Die MEA und PEA beziehen Strom von der EGAT. Die MEA versorgt den Großraum Bangkok mit Ener-gie, während die PEA den Rest des Landes versorgen.

 

  • Förderungen

 

Derzeit stehen im Wesentlichen zwei Förde-rungsarten für Produzenten von Erneuerba-ren Energien zur Verfügung:

 

Zum einen gibt es die Förderung durch sog. Einspeisetarife (Feed-in-Tariff oder „FiT“), bei der der abnehmende Energieversorger (MEA oder PEA) dem einspeisenden Un-ternehmer einen vorab festgelegten Abnah-mepreis zahlt.1

 

 

Hierzu wird zwischen der MEA bzw. PEA und dem einspeisenden Unternehmer ein sog. Power Purchase Agreement („PPA“) ge-schlossen, das den FiT für einen festgelegten Zeitraum garantiert. Auf diese Weise wird das Investment in Erneuerbare Energien ab-gesichert.

 

Zum  anderen  bietet  das  Board  of  Investment

 

(„BOI“)   umfassende   investitionsrechtliche

 

Förderungen an, wie z.B. die Befreiung von der Körperschaftsteuer2 für bis zu 8 Jahre, Befreiung von Importzöllen auf Maschinen und Rohmaterialien, sowie die Möglichkeit für Ausländer, Land zu erwerben, und ver-einfacht ausländische Arbeitskräfte anzustel-len. Einen Überblick über ausgewählte För-dermöglichkeiten enthält die folgende Tabel-le:

 

 

Befreiung von Importzöllen auf Weitere nicht-
Befreiung von der
Fördergruppe Rohmaterialien steuerliche
Körperschaftsteuer Maschinen für die Herstellung
Anreize*
von Exportgütern
A1 8 Jahre (no cap)
A2 8 Jahre (cap)** P P P
A3 5 Jahre (cap)

 

  1. Hierzu zählen u.a. die Möglichkeit für Ausländer, Land zu erwerben, und vereinfacht ausländische Arbeitskräfte anzustellen.

 

  1. Die Höhe der tatsächlich gewährten Körperschaftsteuerbefreiung ist begrenzt auf die Höhe des anfänglichen Investments abzüglich Kosten für Land und Betriebskapital.

 

 

1 Das FiT-Scheme ersetzt seit Anfang 2015 das zuvor gel-
tende Adder-Scheme, bei dem zusätzlich zum Kilowatt- 2  Die  Körperschaftsteuer  in Thailand  beträgt  derzeit
stundenpreis ein Aufschlag gezahlt wurde. 20%.
ã Lorenz & Partners April 2016 Seite 4 von 10
Tel.: +66 (0) 2–287 1882  e-mail: [email protected]

 

 

Nachfolgend sollen die jeweiligen Förde-rungsmöglichkeiten für die verschiedenen Arten von Erneuerbaren Energien darge-stellt werden.

 

  1. Solarenergie

 

Solarkraft ist eine in Thailand im Überfluss verfügbare Ressource, jedoch ist das Poten-zial bisher weitgehend ungenutzt.

 

Derzeit werden ca. 1.300 MW aus Solar-energie gewonnen. Laut AEDP sollen dies bis 2036 6.000 MW werden.

 

  1. a) Einspeisetarif für Solarenergie

 

2013 beschloss das EPPO Rooftop-Photovolatikanlagen bis zu einer Gesamt-leistung von 200 MW zu fördern, wobei 100 MW für industrielle und 100 MW für private Gebäude reserviert sind. Ein Einspeisetarif von 6,85 THB pro kWh (ca. 0,17 EUR) gilt für private Rooftop-Photovoltaikanlagen mit einer Kapazität unter 10 Kilowatt Spitzen-leistung (kilowatt peak bzw. „kWp“), 6,40

 

THB (ca. 0,16 EUR) für industrielle Anlagen zwischen 10 und 250 kWp, sowie 6,01 THB (ca. 0,15 EUR) für industrielle Anlagen zwi-schen 250 und 1.000 kWp. Für Anlagen in den südlichen Grenzprovinzen3 gilt ein Auf-schlag von zusätzlich 0,50 THB (ca. 0.01 EUR) pro kWh.

 

Zudem erließ das Ministry of Industry am 22.10.2014 eine Richtlinie, nach der Rooftop-Photovoltaikanlagen keiner Factory Permit mehr bedürfen, um so die administrativen Hürden insbesondere für Privatpersonen zu verringern.

3 Yala, Pattani, Narathiwat, sowie 4 Distrikte der Provinz Songkla.

 

 

 

 

  1. b) BOI-Förderung

 

Hersteller von Solarzellen und/oder hierfür benötigter Rohmaterialien erhalten 8 Jahre Steuerbefreiung (beschränkt auf die Höhe des Investments) sowie Befreiung von Im-portzöllen auf Maschinen und Rohmateria-lien.4

 

Die Energieproduktion aus Solarenergie er-hält dieselbe Förderung.5

Die Herstellung von Teilen oder Zubehör für solarbetriebene Produkte wird mit einer Steuerbefreiung von 5 Jahren, sowie der Be-freiung von Importzöllen auf Maschinen und Rohmaterialien gefördert.6

 

  1. c) Public Private Partnerships

 

Neben den oben genannten Rooftop-Photovoltaikanlagen gelten besondere Be-stimmungen für großflächige Photovoltaikanlagen, sog. Solar Farms. Die Regelungen stammen aus dem Jahre 2014, wurden jedoch von der ERC erst am 17.9.2015 veröffentlicht, und sollen die bis-herige Förderung für Solar Farms (FiT und Adder Tarif) ersetzen. Laut dieses

 

Governmental      Agency       and       Agricultural

 

Cooperatives  Programme  („Agro-Solar“)   sollen

 

Solar Farms mit einer Kapazität von jeweils bis zu 5 MW und einer Gesamtkapazität von 800 MW entstehen. Diese jeweiligen Projek-te sollen als Kooperation zwischen dem öf-fentlichen und privaten Sektor entstehen (sog. Public Private Partnerships bzw. „PPP“).

 

 

4 Fördergruppe A2 gemäß des BOI Announcement No. 2/2557 (2014), List of Activities Eligible for Investment Promo-tion, Section 5.4.2. http://www.boi.go.th/upload/content/newpolicy-announcement%20as%20of%2020_3_58_23499.pdf.

  • Fördergruppe A2 gemäß Section 7.1.1.2.

 

  • Fördergruppe A3 gemäß Section 5.4.8.

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

Es wird ebenfalls ein FiT gewährt, dieser be-trägt 5,66 THB (ca. 0,14 EUR) pro kWh. Hierzu ist ein Abnehmervertrag (Power Purchase Agreement bzw. „PPA“) mit der MEA bzw. PEA zu schließen, welcher die Abnahme des Stroms und den FiT für 25 Jahre garantiert.

 

 

halten einen zusätzlichen Aufschlag von 0,50 THB (ca. 0,01 EUR) pro kWh.

 

  1. b) BOI-Förderung

 

Die Energieproduktion aus Windkraft erhält 8 Jahre Steuerbefreiung (beschränkt auf die Höhe des Investments) sowie Befreiung von Importzöllen auf Maschinen und Rohmate-

 

 

Parteien des PPA sind jeweils die MEA/PEA und die staatliche Behörde oder Kommune, die zugleich als Projekteigentü-mer fungieren, wobei jede Behörde bzw. Kommune max. 1 Projekt pro Gebiet be-treiben darf. Private Investoren können im Rahmen einer PPP an dem Projekt teilneh-men. Private Investoren müssen in Thailand registrierte Gesellschaften sein und dürfen an mehreren Projekten (bis zu einer Ge-samtkapazität von 50 MW) beteiligt sein.

 

Während der Laufzeit ist eine Übertragung des PPA nur in engen Grenzen und mit Zu-stimmung der ERC möglich. In der Praxis bedeutet dies, dass die PPP für diesen Zeit-raum von 25 Jahren eingegangen wird und danach ggf. eine Übertragung auf einen der Partner erfolgt, wie bspw. bei BOT-Projekten (Build-Operate-Transfer) üblich.

 

  1. Windenergie

 

2013 lag die installierte Kapazität für Wind-energie in Thailand bei ca. 225 MW. Ziel des AEDP sind 3.002 MW bis 2036.

 

  1. a) Einspeisetarif

 

Der Einspeisetarif für Kleinstproduzenten (Gesamtkapazität bis zu 200 kW) von Wind-energie beträgt 6,06 THB (ca. 0,15 EUR) pro kWh, garantiert für bis zu 20 Jahre. An-lagen in den südlichen Grenzprovinzen er-

 

rialien.7

 

  1. Wasserkraft

 

2014 waren in Thailand Anlagen zur Ener-giegewinnung aus Wasserkraft mit einer Ge-samtkapazität von ca. 3.050 MW installiert; hierin enthalten sind von der EGAT betrie-bene Großkraftwerke mit einer Kapazität ca. 2.900 MW.

 

Der AEDP sieht eine Kapazitätssteigerung der kleinen Wasserkraftwerke von derzeit ca. 150 MW auf 376 MW in 2036 vor. Eine Steigerung der Kapazität der bestehenden Großkraftwerke ist im Plan nicht vorgese-hen.

 

  1. a) Einspeisetarif

 

Der Einspeisetarif für Kleinstproduzenten (Kapazität bis zu 200 kW) von Energie aus Wasserkraft beträgt 4,90 THB (ca. 0,12 EUR) pro kWh, garantiert für bis zu 20 Jah-re. Anlagen in den südlichen Grenzprovin-zen erhalten einen zusätzlichen Aufschlag von 0,50 THB (ca. 0,01 EUR) pro kWh.

 

  1. b) BOI-Förderung

 

Die Energieproduktion aus Wasserkraft er-hält 8 Jahre Steuerbefreiung (beschränkt auf die Höhe des Investments) sowie Befreiung

 

 

 

7 Fördergruppe A2 gemäß Section 7.1.1.2.

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

von Importzöllen auf Maschinen und Roh-materialien.8

 

  1. Waste-to-Energy

 

Derzeit werden ca. 65 MW Energie mittels Müllverbrennung („Waste-to-Energy“) gewon-nen. Diese Kapazität soll laut AEDP bis 2036 auf 550 MW ansteigen.

 

  1. a) Einspeisetarif

 

Der Einspeisetarif für Kleinstproduzenten (Kapazität bis zu 200 kW) von Waste-to-Energy setzt sich aus einem Fixbetrag zwi-schen 2,39 und 3,13 THB (ca. 0,06 – 0,08 EUR) pro kWh (je nach Kapazität), garan-tiert für bis zu 20 Jahre, zusammen, sowie einem variablen Anteil, der bis 2017 auf zwi-schen 2,69 THB (ca. 0,07 EUR) und 3,21 THB (ca. 0,08 EUR) (je nach Kapazität) festgelegt wurde und danach inflationsab-hängig angepasst werden soll. Anlagen in den südlichen Grenzprovinzen erhalten ei-nen zusätzlichen Aufschlag von 0,50 THB (ca. 0,01 EUR) pro kWh.

 

  1. b) BOI-Förderung

 

Waste-to-Energy-Projekte erhalten 8 Jahre Be-freiung von der Körperschaftsteuer (ohne Beschränkung auf die Höhe das Invest-ments), sowie Befreiung von Importzöllen auf Maschinen und Rohmaterialien.9

 

Die Herstellung von Treibstoff aus Agrarab-fällen erhält 8 Jahre Steuerbefreiung (be-schränkt auf die Höhe des Investments) so-wie Befreiung von Importzöllen auf Ma-schinen und Rohmaterialien.10

 

 

  1. Biomasse

 

Derzeit werden ca. 2.500 MW Energie aus Biomasse gewonnen. Diese Kapazität soll laut AEDP bis 2036 auf 5.570 MW anstei-gen.

 

  1. a) Einspeisetarif

 

Der Einspeisetarif für Kleinstproduzenten (Kapazität bis zu 200 kW) von Energie aus Biomasse setzt sich aus einem Fixbetrag zwischen 2,39 und 3,13 THB (ca. 0,06 – 0,08 EUR) pro kWh (je nach Kapazität), garan-tiert für bis zu 20 Jahre, zusammen, sowie einem variablen Anteil, der bis 2017 auf zwi-schen 1,85 THB (ca. 0,05 EUR) und 2,21 THB (ca. 0,06 EUR) (je nach Kapazität) festgelegt wurde und danach inflationsab-hängig angepasst werden soll. Anlagen in den südlichen Grenzprovinzen erhalten ei-nen zusätzlichen Aufschlag von 0,50 THB (ca. 0,01 EUR) pro kWh.

 

  1. b) BOI-Förderung

 

Die Energiegewinnung aus Biomasse sowie die Herstellung von Treibstoff aus Biomasse erhalten 8 Jahre Steuerbefreiung (beschränkt auf die Höhe des Investments) sowie Be-freiung von Importzöllen auf Maschinen und Rohmaterialien.11

 

Die Herstellung von Briketts oder Pellets aus Biomasse wird mit einer Steuerbefreiung von 5 Jahren, sowie der Befreiung von Im-portzöllen auf Maschinen und Rohmateria-lien gefördert.12

 

 

8 Fördergruppe A2 gemäß Section 7.1.1.2.
9 Fördergruppe A1 gemäß Section 7.1.1.1. 11 Fördergruppe A2 gemäß Section 7.1.1.2. bzw. 1.16.2.
10 Fördergruppe A2 gemäß Section 1.16.2. 12 Fördergruppe A3 gemäß Section 1.16.3.

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

  1. Biogas

 

Derzeit werden ca. 310 MW Energie aus Bi-ogas gewonnen. Diese Kapazität soll laut AEDP bis 2036 auf 1.280 MW ansteigen.

 

  1. a) Einspeisetarif

 

Der Einspeisetarif für Produzenten von Bi-ogas aus Abfall oder Abwasser beträgt 3,76 THB (ca. 0,09 EUR) pro kWh, garantiert für bis zu 20 Jahre. Anlagen in den südlichen Grenzprovinzen erhalten einen zusätzlichen Aufschlag von 0,50 THB (ca. 0,01 EUR) pro kWh.

 

 

Der Einspeisetarif für Produzenten von Bi-ogas aus Pflanzen setzt sich aus einem Fix-betrag von 2,79 THB (ca. 0,07 EUR) pro kWh, garantiert für bis zu 20 Jahre, zusam-men, sowie einem variablen Anteil, der bis 2017 auf 2,55 THB (ca. 0,06 EUR) festgelegt wurde und danach inflationsabhängig ange-passt werden soll. Anlagen in den südlichen Grenzprovinzen erhalten einen zusätzlichen Aufschlag von 0,50 THB (ca. 0,01 EUR) pro kWh.

 

  1. b) BOI-Förderung

 

Die Energiegewinnung aus Biogas sowie die Herstellung von Biogas aus Abwasser erhal-ten 8 Jahre Steuerbefreiung (beschränkt auf die Höhe des Investments) sowie Befreiung von Importzöllen auf Maschinen und Roh-materialien.13

 

 

 

Projektkategorie Förder-
gruppe
Herstellung von Solarzellen und/oder hierfür benötigter Rohmaterialien A2
Solar
Energiegewinnung aus Solarkraft A2
Herstellung von Teilen oder Zubehör für solarbetriebene Produkte A3
Wind Energiegewinnung aus Windkraft A2
Wasser Energiegewinnung aus Wasserkraft A2
Waste-to- Energiegewinnung mittels Müllverbrennung A1
Energy
Herstellung von Treibstoff aus Agrarabfällen A2
Biomasse Energiegewinnung aus Biomasse A2
Herstellung von Briketts oder Pellets aus Biomasse A3
Biogas Energiegewinnung aus Biogas A2
Herstellung von Biogas aus Abwasser A2

 

 

 

  1. Ausländerinvestitionsrecht

 

Ausländer unterliegen bei geschäftlichen Tä-tigkeiten in Thailand den Beschränkungen des Foreign Business Act B.E. 2542 (1999)

 

(„FBA“). Ausländer im Sinne des FBA sind alle natürlichen Personen, die nicht die thai-ländische Staatsbürgerschaft besitzen, juristi-sche Personen, die nicht in Thailand regis-triert sind, oder juristische Personen, die zwar in Thailand registriert sind, deren An-teile aber zu 50% oder mehr von den beiden zuvor genannten Personengruppen gehalten werden.

 

Für BOI-geförderte Unternehmen besteht die Möglichkeit, von den Beschränkungen des FBA weitgehend befreit zu werden und trotzdem 100% der Gesellschaftsanteile in ausländischer Hand zu halten. Zudem be-steht die Möglichkeit, Land zum Volleigen-tum zu erwerben, soweit dies zur Realisie-rung des geförderten Projektes erforderlich ist. Für ausländische Unternehmen besteht diese Möglichkeit sonst nur in gesondert ausgewiesenen Industriezonen („Industrial Estates“). Zudem wird die Anstellung von ausländischem Personal erheblich erleichtert und Arbeitserlaubnisse werden, soweit für das Projekt erforderlich, unkompliziert ge-währt. Nicht BOI-geförderte Unternehmen müssen für die Beschäftigung von Auslän-dern Mindestkapitalanforderungen erfüllen, d.h. pro Arbeitserlaubnis ist ein registriertes und voll einbezahltes Kapital von 2 Mio. THB (ca. 50.000 EUR) erforderlich.

 

Ohne BOI-Förderung kann entweder ein Joint Venture mit einem thailändischen Partner eingegangen werden, der die Mehr-heit der Anteile am Unternehmen hält. Dies

 

 

hat zur Folge, dass die Beschränkungen des FBA nicht gelten, da das Unternehmen nicht als „Ausländer“ gilt. Falls dies keine Option ist, kann ggf. eine sog. Foreign Business License (“FBL”) beim Ministry of Commerce beantragt werden.

 

  1. Ausblick

 

Erneuerbare Energien sind derzeit ein wich-tiges Thema in der thailändischen Politik, da zum einen zum globalen Umweltschutz bei-getragen werden soll, andererseits aber auch die eigene Abhängigkeit von fossilen Brenn-stoffen (und somit die Abhängigkeit von Rohstoffimporten) reduziert werden soll.

 

Bezüglich der gesetzlichen Regelungen gab es in den letzten Jahren eine rasante Ent-wicklung, was sich bereits daran zeigt, dass der ursprüngliche Entwurf des AEDP von Anfang 2015 innerhalb von nur einem hal-ben Jahr grundlegend überarbeitet und er-heblich erweitert wurde.

 

Neben der Förderung von Investitionen in Erneuerbare Energien wird jedoch auch der Ausbau der Netzkapazität entscheidend für den Erfolg der aktuellen Energiepolitik sein. Für den Ausbau der Netzkapazität hat die EGAT beispielsweise für die nächsten 5 Jah-re ein Budget von 300 Mrd. THB (ca. 7,5 Mrd. EUR) veranschlagt.

 

Vor diesem Hintergrund bleibt abzuwarten, inwieweit die ambitionierten Ziele der thai-ländischen Regierung realisiert werden kön-nen. Bereits jetzt ist allerdings klar, dass Thailand aufgrund der umfangreichen För-derungen und Investitionsanreize attraktive Möglichkeiten insbesondere für ausländische

 

 

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

Investoren bietet. Dank der BOI-Förderung werden die sonst üblichen Hürden des Aus-länderinvestitionsrechts erheblich reduziert und ermöglichen so den Markteintritt auch für mittelständische Unternehmen. Insbe-sondere deutsches Know-how und Techno-logie genießen in Thailand seit jeher einen guten Ruf und sind derzeit daher umso ge-fragter.

 

error: Sorry, this information cannot be copied / printed. If you would like to received the text as pdf, please send us an e-mail.